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Archaeological Institute of America

AKA AIA

Boston, MA

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Archaeological Institute of America

Also Known As:
AIA
Physical Address:
Boston, MA 02215 
EIN:
13-5669180
Web URL:
www.archaeological.org
Leadership:
Mr. Peter Herdrich
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Fiscal Year Starting: Jul 01, 2011
Fiscal Year Ending: Jun 30, 2012
Revenue
Total Revenue $6,450,433
Expenses
Total Expenses $6,517,583

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Basic Organization Information

Archaeological Institute of America

Also Known As:
AIA
Physical Address:
Boston, MA 02215 
EIN:
13-5669180
Web URL:
www.archaeological.org 
NTEE Category:
A Arts, Culture, and Humanities 
A20 Arts, Cultural Organizations - Multipurpose 
B Educational Institutions 
B03 Professional Societies & Associations 
W Public, Society Benefit 
W01 Alliance/Advocacy Organizations 
Ruling Year:
1958 

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Mission Statement

The Institute is dedicated to the greater understanding of the record of the human past, to the protection and preservation of the world's archaeological resources and the information they contain and to the encouragement and support of archaeological research and publication.

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Revenue and Expenses

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Balance Sheet

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Forms 990 Provided by the Nonprofit

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Leadership (GuideStar ExchangeThe GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more. December, 2013)

Mr. Peter Herdrich

Term:

Since June 2010

Profile:

Peter Herdrich is currently the CEO of the AIA and the publisher of ARCHAEOLOGY magazine.He was previously the Director of Industry Programs at the Paley Center for Media in New York City after a long career in television news during which he worked for ABC, CBS, Fox, and most recently as Senior Producer atInside Edition. Herdrich won the prestigiousInvestigative Reporters and Editorsaward for documenting negligence, patient abuse and unsanitary conditions at Veterans Administration hospitals while working for ABC News'Primetime Live.As well as being a member on the AIA Site Preservation Committee, Herdrich is also the chair of the AIA's Media Task Force and a General Trustee. One of Herdrich's other passions is rare books and he is a member of the Board of Directors of Rare Book School, an independent institute supporting the study of the history of books,printing, and related subjects, located at the University of Virginia. Herdrich sees many parallels between archaeology and journalism and enjoys how both fields tell human stories. He once told the AIA, ""It is said that journalism is the first draft of history. If that makes archaeology the first revised edition of the text, (or perhaps the 23rd), that still leaves much common ground between the two fields.""

Leadership Statement:

After some deficit years, the AIA has achieved a balanced budget for the second consecutive year, an achievement that we are all very proud of. Our 220,000 subscribing members of the AIA make us the largest archaeological organization in the world! This year I am excited to announce the establishment of the Cotsen Excavation Fund, the largest single gift in the history of the AIA, which will allow us to award two $25,000 annual grants to archaeologists. We are also pleased to announce the establishment of the Kress Grant for Research and Publication in Classical Art and Architecture which provides publication funding for professional members. Finally, I'm happy to say we are preparing to celebrate our second National Archaeology Day after Rep. Michael Capuano of MA recognized it in the Congressional Record last year. None of this would be possible without the loyal support of our members and donors, and for that I am thankful. Please help us to continue our efforts to promote the research, interpretation and preservation of our ancient past by giving a gift to the AIA today.



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Program: Fellowships and Scholarships

Budget:
$143,763
Category:
Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served:
Other Named Groups
Adults
College Aged (18-26 years)

Program Description:

The AIA is pleased to offer fellowships for travel and study to deserving scholars and a number of scholarships and grants for students, publications, and AIA Societies. Every fellowship that we award has resulted in scholarly publications and presentations. The AIA/DAI Exchange Fellowships are sponsored by the AIA and the German Institute of Archaeology. They support reciprocal study fellowships in the U.S. and Berlin. The Anna C. and Oliver C. Colburn Fellowship supports study at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. The Harriet and Leon Pomerance Fellowship supports a project related to Aegean Bronze Age archaeology. The Helen M. Woodruff Fellowship supports study at the American Academy in Rome. The Olivia James Traveling Fellowships supports travel and study throughout the geography of the ancient Greek world. We are also pleased to offer the Archaeology of Portugal Fellowship. One of our newest grants is the Cotsen Excavation Grant which provides two $25,000 grants for excavation research throughout the world. The Site Preservation Grant supports the conservation of ancient monuments. The Society Outreach & Education Grant is to encourage Local Societies to host events such as a teachers' workshop, kids' archaeology fair, or a symposium in a local library that promote archaeology and community outreach. We also offer several publication grants including the Publication Preparation Grant, the AIA Publication Subvention Program, and our newest Samuel H. Kress Grants for Research and Publication in Classical Art and Architecture. We also offer the Graduate Student Travel Award to help with the cost of travel to the AIA Annual Meeting and the Jane C. Waldbaum Archaeological Field School Scholarship which assists undergraduates in the cost of field school.

Program Long-Term Success:

Through the AIA's fellowship and scholarship programs, our goal is to provide professional archaeologists and students with the opportunity to conduct research and present and publish their findings. Our scholarship program provides undergraduate students with the opportunity to participate in their first field school, often for many, this is the first time they have been out of the country and the lessons learned are enormous. Many of these students have gone on to pursue graduate work in archaeology. One such scholarship winner is now an academic trustee of the AIA!

Program Short-Term Success:

During FY2012, thirteen archaeologists were provided research and publication fellowships, 72 graduate students were provided scholarships to attend and present their research at the Archaeological Institute of America Annual Meeting, and seven undergraduate students were provided with scholarships to enable them to participate in their first archaeological field school.

Program Success Monitored by:

The fellowship and scholarship committee, comprised of professional archaeologists and other scholars, monitor the success of the program. We would very much like to be able to grant more awards as the need is enormous and the committee receives dozens more quality applications from deserving students than can be awarded through current funding.

Program Success Examples:

The 2011 recipient of the Colburn Fellowship, Yuki Furuya, of the University of Cincinnati researched Cretan jewelry, its iconographical parallels, and symbolism of the Protopalatial and Neopalatial periods of the Minoan civilization. Her data was mapped regionally and diachronically to investigate the development and dissemination of religious and political powers during these periods. Through this fellowship opportunity Yuki researched specific Minoan jewelry owners, as jewelry characteristically provides information specific to its wearer. The effort to place ""faces"" in Minoan civilization is still new because, traditionally, Minoan scholarship has discussed society on a larger scale.

Program: Site Preservation

Budget:
$151,324
Category:
Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served:
Other Named Groups

Program Description:

The Site Preservation Fund awards grants to AIA Member-sponsored applicants to assist with repairs, document endangered sites, enhance visitors' understanding, and/or help ensure the safety and security of the site. The AIA takes a holistic approach to site preservation, using the organization's strengths to fulfill the AIA's mission and make the greatest overall impact. The program focuses on education, outreach, facilitating the spread of best practices, and direct preservation. The AIA is uniquely qualified to carry out a Site Preservation Program because of our close connection to our network of professional members in the field; 130 year history of archaeological public outreach; widespread programming; and access to millions of people interested in archaeology. Our program focuses on grant giving, recognition and dissemination of best practices, and advocacy, and public outreach. One of our most recent Site Preservation Grant award winners is the The Little Bay Plantation Archaeology Project in support of our collaboration with the Montserrat National Trust to protect the nascent Little Bay Plantation National Heritage Site from urban development and to increase community involvement in its preservation through education and interpretation. Our two-year project will expand our summer program in archaeology for students from the Montserrat Secondary School, augment site interpretation, and better protect the site that lies in the center of an on-going urban development project by erecting protective fencing.

Program Long-Term Success:

1) The AIA Site Preservation Program works to ensure the long-term preservation of archaeological sites through a number of methods. Our education and outreach activities provide better-informed communities that understand the value of their local archaeological sites. The ever-increasing number of Site Preservation Grants provides direct preservation, while also encouraging communities to take advantage of the economic opportunities related to the site. By establishing and promoting best practices in the field of site preservation, the AIA is also providing a guideline for scholars that will ensure the protection of our shared cultural heritage.

Program Short-Term Success:

1) In addition to increasing the number of site preservation grants awarded to deserving projects around the world, the AIA is also working continuously to bring people together in the efforts to discuss the future of site preservation; educating local communities on the importance of local archaeological sites; and helping to remove immediate threats to the preservation of ancient sites.

Program Success Monitored by:

The Site Preservation Program is monitored by the Site Preservation Committee, composed of Executive AIA leaders, professional archaeologists, and other scholars.

Program Success Examples:

Clarke Wernecke, Executive Director of the Gault School of Archaeological Research (GSAR) in Texas - ""The programs made possible by the AIA [Site Preservation] Grant have been a great success. GSAR doubled the number of students reached by our programs, hugely increased the numbers of teachers contacted, and doubled the number of people taking tours of the site itself. The AIA [Site Preservation] Grant enabled us to expand local awareness of what archaeology is, does, and why it is important. Establishing the importance of studying the past, especially the importance of context, is a big step towards effective site preservation.""

Program: National Lecture Program

Budget:
$231,200
Category:
Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served:
Other Named Groups
Adults
College Aged (18-26 years)

Program Description:

Our most popular educational activity, the National Lecture Program connects practicing archaeologists with nearly 20,000 people each year for stimulating one-on-one discussion. The AIA's 117th year of its Lecture Program began in September 2012 and will run through May 2013. Lectures are free, and all are welcome. Top scholars from North America and abroad will be presenting a wide range of current archaeological topics at Societies throughout the United States and Canada. Thousands of individuals of all ages and backgrounds will be presented with discoveries fresh from the field and research lab, told to audiences first-hand by professional archaeologists and scholars. Nearly 300 Lectures are scheduled through our Societies, so there is truly something for everyone. Topics from the Classical world include the music of ancient Greece, scenes from the Roman stage, as well as Greco-Roman magic. In the Near East the cities of ancient Mesopotamia will be discovered, with reports on new work at Troy and Gordion; in Egypt the rule of Ramesses the Great will be examined, the Temple of Amun-Ra will be viewed through 3-D imaging, and Napoleon's campaign will be studied as the beginning of modern Egyptology. In the New World, the first Floridians, Mesoamerican gaming, Maya cosmology, and the effects of ancient volcanoes will all be discussed. Underwater topics will include deep submergence archaeology, the Titanic at 100, Byzantine shipwrecks, and ghost ships of the Klondike gold rush. Archaeological spies, Armenian sacred arts, archaeology in Antarctica, and Otzi the Iceman of the Alps will all make appearances. The Lecture Program is made possible through the support of friends and members like you who are committed to the research, interpretation, and preservation of our ancient past. We hope to see you at a lecture soon!

Program Long-Term Success:

The Lecture Program is in its 117th season, making it the longest running program at the AIA.

Program Short-Term Success:

The diversity of topics offered by the Lecture Program has certainly expanded throughout the last three years. While the majority of lectures used to focus primarily on Classical archaeology, that is Greek, Roman, and Etruscan subject matter, the last few years have seen a broadening of topic material. This year the AIA is fortunate to offer lectures in Classical as well as Near Eastern, New World, Egyptian, Medieval, Underwater, Asian, European, African, Oceanic, and Heritage Conservation archaeology. This expansion of topics in our Lecture Program offers more variety for the public to best suit their interests and allows all current research in archaeological science to be explored, rather than just limiting ourselves to one genre.

Program Success Monitored by:

The Lecture program is monitored by Laurel Nilsen-Sparks, our Lectures & Fellowships Coordinator, in collaboration with our over 106 Local Societies.

Program Success Examples:

After listening to the Kress Lecture entitled "Stonehenge: New Discoveries" by Professor Mike Parker Pearson, a member of the Salem, Oregon Local Society commented, "Mike Parker Peason sure drew a crowd and was a huge success. We had 419 people! Forty-three of the folks in the audience were from the deaf community, thanks to the outreach grant." [The AIA had awarded this Society an Outreach Grant, which they used to provide sign language interpreters for their public lectures.

Program: Annual Meeting

Budget:
$100,935
Category:
Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served:
Other Named Groups
Adults
College Aged (18-26 years)

Program Description:

Held every January, the AIA's Annual Meeting is the major meeting for Classical and Mediterranean archaeologists in the world. The Joint Annual Meeting (AM) is organized by the Archaeological Institute of America and the American Philological Association. The gathering is attended by professional archaeologists, students, and supporters, and is the occasion to present cutting-edge research, explore breakthrough discoveries, and network professionally, making the Annual Meeting a preeminent event on the archaeological calendar. This year's Annual Meeting will take place in Seattle, Washington at the Washington State Convention Center from January 3-6, 2013. The three day event includes over 200 events and more than 800 speakers. Nearly 1,000 hopeful presenters have submitted abstracts for inclusion in the academic programs. In addition to our regular session formats, several new sessions are being introduced in the 2013 program including a Poster Colloquium, Graduate Student "Lightning Session," and dedicated sessions for undergraduate poster and paper presentations. The Graduate Student Travel Award is available to assist graduate students presenting papers at the Annual Meeting with their travel expenses.

Program Long-Term Success:

For 114 years, the AIA Annual Meeting has brought together the world's leading archaeologists to present the latest in archaeological discoveries and analyses, and has shaped the discipline and informed our understanding of the human past. Last year's record breaking attendance of 3,000 included over 600 first-time participants and a 30% increase from international participants.

Program Short-Term Success:

The AM has grown tremendously over the past decade not only in attendance, but also in the scope of papers presented, demographic of attendees, and focus on professional development, cultural heritage management, new technologies and other topics of critical importance to the field. Each January more than 3,000 attendees from over 30 countries and nearly every state in the Union attend this Joint Annual Meeting, allowing for the exchange of knowledge and ideas between top professionals in the field, post-doctoral, graduate, and undergraduate students, as well as archaeology enthusiasts, ARCHAEOLOGY magazine subscribers, and AIA local society members. In their entirety, our over 700 attendees represent Colleges & Universities; Government Agencies; Magazines, Journals, Newspapers, and other Scholarly Publications; Cultural Resource Management Companies; Non Profit Organizations; International Institutes; Archaeological Research Centers; Museums & Research Institutes.

Program Success Monitored by:

Programming for the AM has been skillfully crafted by the Program for the Annual Meeting Committees of both the Archaeological Institute of America and the American Philological Association. It is also overseen by the Governing Board and Executive leaders of the AIA.

Program Success Examples:

Michael Galaty, Chair for the AM 2011 & Professor of Anthropology at Millsaps College, "I have attended the Annual Meeting of the AIA since the mid-1990s, when I was a graduate student. I joined the Program for the Annual Meeting Committee in 2005 and recently became its Chair. The Annual Meeting is vital to the archaeological community in various ways, so maintaining the quality of the academic program is absolutely essential. The Annual Meeting draws together various constituencies - professors and students of archaeology, art history, and epigraphy, professionals, amateurs, and even children - all of whom are bound together by a shared commitment to and passion for the world's wondrous past. The Annual Meeting presents a unique opportunity to stop, see friends and colleagues, talk about archaeology, share ideas, and network. In organizing and supporting the Annual Meeting, the AIA does the field a huge service."

Program: National Archaeology Day

Budget:
$30,000
Category:
Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served:
Other Named Groups
Other Named Groups
Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)

Program Description:

National Archaeology Day, held on October 20th, is an international celebration of archaeology and the thrill of discovery. Every October the AIA and archaeological organizations across the United States, Canada, and abroad present archaeological programs and activities for people of all ages and interests. The AIA also provides virtual participation opportunities that allow anyone in the world with access to the Internet to join in the celebration! Whether it is a family-friendly archaeology fair, a guided tour of a local archaeological site, a simulated dig, a lecture or a classroom visit from an archaeologist, the interactive, hands-on National Archaeology Day programs provide the chance to indulge your inner Indiana Jones! One of our most successful National Archaeology Day events is the Boston Archaeology Fair held in conjunction with the Boston Museum of Science. At the fair, participants are able to explore the exciting world of archaeology through a variety of interactive activities and games. This year is the 6th annual AIA-MOS Archaeology Fair, hosted October 19-20 at the Boston Museum of Science. Come check it out!

Program Long-Term Success:

In less than a year after our first National Archaeology Day, we already have more than five times the number of Collaborating Organizations as in 2011, and this number is steadily increasing with each passing week. So far we have nearly 200 events thanks to the enthusiasm of fellow archaeological groups and interested institutions. We are already looking to expand the international nature of this event for 2013 by changing the name to just "Archaeology Day".

Program Short-Term Success:

Over 115 programs were associated with the first Archaeology Day in 2011. Fourteen groups officially joined as collaborating organizations. These ranged from large national organizations like the Society for American Archaeology (SAA), Society for Historical Archaeology (SHA), and the American Anthropological Association (AAA) to small county museums and local libraries. In all, almost 15,000 people participated in the inaugural event and we're expecting more than double that number this year. In fact, we already have 100 collaborating organizations this year across 50 states, 9 provinces, and 4 continents to reach an even wider global audience!

Program Success Monitored by:

Program success is monitored by the number of events and participants as well as the diversity of types of events. These statistics are gathered from local event organizers. Events last year included lectures, archaeology fairs, interactive activities, site visits, symposia, laboratory open houses, regional conferences, special museum tours/exhibits, information booths, student presentations, excavations and film screenings. There is an event for everyone all over the world to try!

Program Success Examples:

Last year, one family drove over five and a half hours to attend a National Archaeology Day event so that their son, a 17-year-old aspiring archaeologist, could participate in the day's activities. One participant claimed to have spent eight hours puzzling out a virtual scavenger the AIA created online and another wrote to us asking to hold similar activities everyday. One 2011 event included Near Eastern archaeologists demonstrating the use of cylinder seals on clay; underwater archaeologists exhibiting the equipment needed to study underwater shipwrecks; historical archaeologists refitting broken pottery; and AIA society members and university students explaining the importance of context and why archaeological sites need to be preserved. The areas of the world and subjects within archaeology that the public is be exposed to through National Archaeology Day events and activities are virtually limitless!


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Accomplishments from the Past Year: Organized over 300 free public lectures in 108 communities across the United States and Canada. We bring the world's foremost archaeologists to present their fresh-from-the-field discoveries to a community near youHelped to save threatened archaeological sites including Hoyo Negro, Mexico: the final resting place of some of the oldest human remains discovered in the Americas; Thinlich Ohinga, Kenya: a 500-year old stone monument in the Luoland; Lod, Israel: the site of Kahn el-Hillu, the focus of an educational program that brings Jewish and Arab children together to learn about history through archaeology and to excavate the site; and, two medieval projects in Ireland, the Blackfriary at Trim in County Meath and the Dominican Priory at Tulsk in County RoscommonOrganized the first-ever National Archaeology Day (now an annual event) with free archaeology events for all ages organized from coast-to-coastAwarded key scholarships and fellowships to ensure that students and professional archaeologists have funding critical for the study of the pastArchaeology magazine reported stories ranging from a Colonial wreck in the Gulf of Mexico, to ancient Afghanistan, to Australian aboriginal history, to digs in New York, Pittsburgh and Detroit, making sure that the public is well informed on archaeological news around the world Goals for the Current Year: To increase membership and inspire AIA members to greater levels of engagementTo promote and invigorate the AIA's 109 Local Societies and increase community engagementTo increase professional service offerings for our constituency of professional archaeologistsTo design and pilot more educational offerings for K-12 and interested adultsTo promote best practices in archaeological site preservation to ensure that the archaeologists and conservators working at sites around the globe achieve success
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