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Camp Fire USA Organization Name provided in the GuideStar Exchange* as of 11/25/2013: Camp Fire USA

Organization Name as listed in the IRS Business Master File as of 09/08/2014: CAMP FIRE NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS

* The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.

AKA  Camp Fire Alabama
Birmingham, AL
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GuideStar Summary

&1002;                GuideStar Exchange Committed to transparency ?
This organization is a Gold-level GuideStar Exchange participant, demonstrating its commitment to transparency.

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&1002; Registered with IRS Legitimacy information is available
&1002; Financial Data Annual Revenue and Expense data reported
&1002; Forms 990 2012, 2010, and 2009 Forms 990 filed with the IRS
&1002; Mission Objectives Mission Statement is available
&1002; Impact Summary Impact Summary from the nonprofit and Charting Impact Report are available
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Basic Organization Information

Camp Fire USA Organization Name provided in the GuideStar Exchange* as of 11/25/2013: Camp Fire USA

Organization Name as listed in the IRS Business Master File as of 09/08/2014: CAMP FIRE NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS

* The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
Also Known As: Camp Fire Alabama
Physical Address: Birmingham, AL 35209 
EIN: 63-0498347
Web URL: www.campfire-al.org 
NTEE Category: O Youth Development
O43 Camp Fire
O Youth Development
O99 Other Youth Development N.E.C.
Year Founded: 1910 
Ruling Year: 1969 


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Mission Statement

Our Promise: Young people want to shape the world. Camp Fire provides the opportunity to find their spark, lift their voice, and discover who they are. In Camp Fire, it begins now. Light the fire within.

Legitimacy Information

This organization is registered with the IRS.

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Institutional funders should note that an organization’s inclusion on GuideStar.org does not satisfy IRS Rev. Proc. 2011-33 for identifying supporting organizations.

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Annual Revenue & Expenses (GuideStar Exchange,
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November 2013)

Fiscal Year Starting: January 1, 2010
Fiscal Year Ending: December 31, 2010

Total Revenue $1,448,041
Total Expenses $1,376,304

Revenue & Expenses (GuideStar Exchange,
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
November 2013)

Fiscal Year Starting: January 1, 2010
Fiscal Year Ending: December 31, 2010

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Balance Sheet (IRS Form 990)

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Forms 990 Received from the IRS Additional Information
IRS Form 990 is an annual document used by approximately one-third of all public charities to report information about their finances and operations to the federal government. GuideStar uses data from Form 990 to populate its database with financial information about nonprofit organizations. Posting Form 990 images on the GuideStar website is an ongoing process.

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Forms 990 Provided by the Nonprofit

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Financial Statements

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Annual Reports

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Leadership (GuideStar Exchange,
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November 2013)

Ms. Nancy O Meadows

Board Chair (GuideStar Exchange,
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November 2013)

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Board Co-Chair

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Board of Directors (GuideStar Exchange,
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November 2013)

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Board Leadership Practices (GuideStar Exchange,
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November 2013)
?

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

Board Orientation & Education ?
Why does this matter? Without clarity around their responsibilities and expectations, board members are not positioned to succeed. They may find themselves challenged to fulfill their governance responsibilities or frustrated by the expectations that the organization has set for them. BoardSource recommends that every new board member participate in a formal orientation process, and that all board members sign a pledge or agreement committing to their board service and to all of the responsibilities and expectations that come with service. Ideally, board members also should participate in a formal governance training program prior to serving on a board.

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?
Response Not Provided
CEO Oversight ?
Why does this matter? Oversight and management of the chief executive is one of the board’s most important legal responsibilities. The CEO or executive director is the board's single employee, and - just like any other employer/employee relationship - regular and written assessment is critical to ensuring that the chief executive and board are communicating openly about goals and performance. BoardSource recommends that boards conduct formal, written reviews of their chief executives on an annual basis, which should include an in-person discussion with the chief executive and distribution of the written evaluation to the full board.

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?
Response Not Provided
Ethics & Transparency ?
Why does this matter? A commitment to handling conflicts of interests is essential to creating an organizational culture of transparency. Boards should create and follow a policy for identifying and handling conflicts of interest, whether real or perceived. BoardSource recommends that organizations review the conflict-of-interest statement and require signed disclosures from all board members and senior staff on an annual basis.

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements within the past year?
Response Not Provided
Board Composition ?
Why does this matter? The best boards are composed of individuals who bring a variety of skills, perspectives, backgrounds, and resources to tackle the complex and strategic challenges confronting their organizations. BoardSource recommends that boards commit to diversity and inclusion by establishing written policies and practices, which include strategic and intentional recruitment of diverse board members, continual commitment to inclusivity, and equal access to board leadership opportunities.

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?
Response Not Provided
Board Performance ?
Why does this matter? Boards need to regularly assess their own performance. Doing so ensures that they are being intentional about how they govern their organization, which is a critical component of effective board leadership. BoardSource recommends that a board conduct a self-assessment of its performance a minimum of once every three years to ensure that it is staying on track with its roles and responsibilities.

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?
Response Not Provided

Officers for Fiscal Year (IRS Form 990)

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Highest Paid Employees & Their Compensation (IRS Form 990)

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People information was last updated by the nonprofit in November 2013

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Programs

Program: Career Prep (GuideStar Exchange,
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
November 2013)

Budget:
--
Category:
Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served:
Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)
None
None

Program Description:

The Career Prep program provides young people from grades 5 - 12 with the opportunity to gather knowledge about their personalities and interests, and teaches them how to transform those interests into a career. The program includes taking interest surveys and discussions on how one's personality and interests can lead to a fulfilling career. The students discuss the career they plan to choose and are encouraged to keep their minds open to new career possibilities. Older program participants are encouraged to discuss people that have influenced them and people they admire and why. Detailed and individually customized career print-outs are provided based on the student's interests, and information is given on how to further explore those careers. The print-outs include updated information on education/training, salaries, future job outlook, working conditions, and related occupations. These materials will assist students in developing a career portfolio. Participants are also given a list of websites to use for career research. Career Prep helps school guidance counselors cover one of the many required topics listed in the state model for Comprehensive Counseling and Guidance in Alabama Public Schools. There is a tremendous need for career exploration/preparation in all communities. Students, in general, have very little knowledge of the wide variety of career options in the work force. Their knowledge comes mostly from parents, family, and/or television. Also, students usually don't see the connection between personality, aptitudes, and career choices. The Career Prep program shows the relationship between the three and gives important information on how to research careers and the levels of education/training needed to pursue a chosen career. This information also helps students understand the relationship between accomplishing more in school and being able to pursue the career which they desire.

Program Long-Term Success:

By the end of 2014, there will be a 15% increase in the participants' understanding of the connection between personalities, interests, talents, and their "perfect" career choice as measured by pre/post tests. By the end of 2014, there will be a 20% increase in the participants' understanding of the importance of exploring careers in early grades as measured by pre/post tests. By the end of 2014, there will be a 15% increase in the participants' understanding of the influence values, needs, and wants have on their career choice.

Program Short-Term Success:

94% of participants understood that career goals should be a combination of needs, wants, values, interests, and talents. 96% of participants understood they should not wait until their senior year to begin exploring careers.

Program Success Monitored by:

Pre and Post Evaluations

Program Success Examples:

Program: Character Development - Outside-In (GuideStar Exchange,
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
November 2013)

Budget:
--
Category:
Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served:
Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)
None
None

Program Description:

The Character Development/Outside-In program helps to combat bullying and increase acceptance of diversity among middle school students. Before this day-long program begins, 11th and 12th grade students from within the same school system are recommended by counselors and selected to be Outside-In Peer Mentors. The Peer Mentors receive one day of training. After training, the Peer Mentors will lead 60 middle school students (also selected by counselors) in activities and engage them in discussions regarding stereotypes and bullying. The activities are designed to let diverse students get to know each other and to create a compassionate, respectful, and tolerant caring majority within the school environment. High school students deliver the program because the middle school students respect the older youth, are eager to model their behavior, and know they have recently survived the pressures of middle school. The program is meant to empower students to share what they have learned with others, creating a ripple effect among the student body. It is our hope that more students will reach out to others who feel "outside" of the school community and bring them "in". When school counselors started to notice a rise in bullying, intimidation, and violence in their schools, they turned to Camp Fire to help combat this problem. 160,000 students miss school every day because they fear being bullied. Additionally, the U.S. Secret Service reports that two thirds of 37 school shootings involved attackers who "felt persecuted, bullied, threatened, attacked, or injured by others prior to the incident." The Character Development/Outside-In program was designed as a way to help students create solutions to this pressing problem. With school personnel, youth leaders, students, and Camp Fire all working together, the character traits of respect, compassion, tolerance, caring, and responsibility are fostered. We encourage students to promote unity with the school and community by first acknowledging the problems that exist and then searching for solutions.

Program Long-Term Success:

By the end of 2014, the middle school participants in Outside-In will demonstrate a 10% increase in their understanding of cliques and stereotypes, the differences in the various types of bullying, and what action(s) to take when bullying occurs, as measured by a pre and post test.

Program Short-Term Success:

The following are measured results from the 2012 fall semester: 97% of participants said they would be more willing to participate in activities that help break down cliques, stereotypes and bullying. 94% of participants said they would be willing to share what they have learned from this program with others in their school who did not participate in the program. 96% of participants agreed that the program helped them to better understand and appreciate the differences in others. 94% of participants said that participating in this program helped them become more aware of the types of bullying and ways to combat them. 94% of participants said that after the program they have a better understanding of the true definitions of cliques and stereotypes. 95% of participants said that Outside-In helped encourage them to get to know others before forming an opinion. 88% of participants believe that experiences had through this program will make a difference in the atmosphere of their middle school. Additionally, data from pre and post testing shows an average 12 percentage point increase in middle school students' knowledge about cliques, stereotypes, and bullying.

Program Success Monitored by:

Pre and Post Evaluations and Counselor Surveys

Program Success Examples:

1. A high school student that participated in Outside-In and some other students at the high school were inspired to do something about the harassment that occurs at their school. They coordinated with their counselor to plan and create a bullying prevention program that focuses on bystander empowerment. 2. When asked in a follow-up survey how he has changed how he treats others since returning to school after the program, a middle school student said, "I treat them knowing that I don't know what their personal life is, and that stereotypes don't help at all." Also, when asked if he has noticed a difference in the attitudes and actions of others who participated in Outside-In Day with him, the student said, "One of the boys in my group stuck up for me, which I deeply appreciated."

Program: Club (GuideStar Exchange,
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
November 2013)

Budget:
--
Category:
Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served:
Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)
None
None

Program Description:

Camp Fire Clubs are for youth of all ages. Youth participate in outdoor and camping activities, service projects, and events. Camp Fire USA Clubs meet around their desired schedule and are generally led by two or more adults who have volunteered their time and skills. Meetings are held after school, in the evenings, or on weekends. Camp Fire provides training and curriculum for the volunteers. The Camp Fire club program is unique in that it is curriculum- (not activity-) based, so each club project has a specific outcome. Additionally, club programs are open to everyone, so youth are able to interact with, and learn to work with, a diverse group of people.Youth learn to achieve goals and have fun together. Young people today feel that they can change the world now, and club members are able to make a direct impact on their communities on a regular basis. They take on leadership roles in service projects of their choosing, which helps them become responsible citizens concerned about their communities and society. Club programs are progressive, meaning that as youth grow and develop, their leadership roles increase. Club allows youth to learn through experience, and equips these future leaders to take their place in business, government, and academics.

Program Long-Term Success:

Program Short-Term Success:

Each member of thirteen groups earned an average of five badges for projects they completed. The groups participated in approximately ten service projects. Successful club projects included delivering Veteran's Day cards to the local VA, delivering Easter eggs and notes to local nursing home residents, ringing the bell for the Salvation Army, helping serve meals for needy families at a local church, helping to construct the nature trail behind a local elementary school, making goody bags for local Cancer Center patients, picking up trash at a local school, collecting canned goods for the Crisis Center, collecting and donating items to the Humane Shelter, collecting and donating items for Oklahoma tornado victims, and recycling over 42,000 pounds of paper and 600 pounds of aluminum.

Program Success Monitored by:

Registration and attendance records will be kept and tracked to verify results.

Program Success Examples:

One of our club members experienced the sudden and unexpected loss of her mother. This was a difficult time for this young woman and her family. Her group members supported her during this time. Camp Fire made the decision to scholarship her member fee for the duration of her time with the club program, so that no matter what, she is able to continue to be a part of this group and the increased support it offers. Club will continue to be an important aspect of her life, as the volunteer leaders will provide positive female role models.

Program: Environmental Education (Outdoor Education & Hosted Groups) (GuideStar Exchange,
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
November 2013)

Budget:
--
Category:
Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served:
Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)
Adults
None

Program Description:

Camp Fletcher's Environmental Education programs meet the needs of both students and teachers through our Outdoor Education field trips, as well as a variety of Hosted Groups who utilize the site for personal programming. The Outdoor Education field trips are offered to preschool, elementary, and middle school students in the fall and spring. Age appropriate curriculum is utilized in an outdoor classroom setting. The programs are designed to enhance educational outcomes and youth development. A student needs assessment is completed by each teacher so that camp staff may suggest suitable curriculum. Our vision is to offer experiential programming that will leave a life-long impression and eagerness to learn, to increase students' understanding of the natural environment, and to increase competency in science, math, literacy, environmental education, and physical fitness. Topic examples are: Water cycle, Filtration & Erosion, Clouds & Pollution, The Five Senses, etc. Hosted Groups utilize Camp Fletcher's facilities as accommodations for personal programming. Camp offers facilitators for specialized programming such as ropes course, canoeing, swimming, marksmanship, hiking, and overnight stays. The programs are flexible and custom, allowing a group to achieve their own goals, whether they be team-building, physical fitness, a service project, etc. We all have a role to play in ensuring that the environment we live in is healthy and well-maintained for future generations to enjoy. While children are still young and in school, we have an opportunity to educate them about the importance of spending time outdoors and the difference it can make in the world around us. Through experiential learning at camp, children are provided with outdoor academics in a collaborative environment with their peers. Many of the programs featured in our Environmental Education field trips are directly related to science, which helps teachers elevate their instruction to a new level through memorable application of the information given to their students. Camp Fire believes that when children and youth get a chance to be outdoors, to work with others in the community, and to learn respect for nature, their personal regard increases.

Program Long-Term Success:

Students will demonstrate increased knowledge of environmental stewardship and learn to evaluate choices and make responsible decisions concerning the environment, using curriculum customized to meet the needs of the class and course of study.

Program Short-Term Success:

97% of students learned new information regarding the surrounding environment. 98% of students felt they were able to make a responsible decision.

Program Success Monitored by:

Results are measured by post-event surveys.

Program Success Examples:

1. My name is ---, and I'm the Pastor of Children and Families at --- located in ---, Alabama. I would like to commend Camp Fletcher located in McCalla/Bessemer, Alabama. The camp director and the other staff were wonderful. All from management down were a pleasure to work with. We stayed three nights and ate a total of nine meals. Everything was beyond our expectations. Looking forward to next year...only 362 more days! There could be a few updates made, but for the history of the camp and the age of the buildings, this camp has been well taken care of. Very clean, grounds well kept, kitchen clean, and meals were wonderful. Thank you, Thank you, Thank you. 2. I had the pleasure of facilitating an 8th grade group of peer mediators from --- School that attended Camp Fletcher through the Environmental Education Hosted Group Program. This is a group of students that knew each other through school and were chosen to be in this elite group of peer mediators. The student advisor for this group wanted them to not just know each other, but to form a team and learn to work with each other. Our challenge course provided them with opportunities to overcome obstacles to complete certain tasks while working together as a team. We hoped to achieve group cohesion by encouraging them to develop communication skills, bond as a group, and develop self-confidence. When they first stepped off the bus they were very rowdy and loud. It was difficult to get their attention and keep them focused on the task they needed to complete to continue onto the next element. After a challenging element at the beginning of the morning we had the participants take a seat and discuss the difficulty in the element. The challenge was for them to work together to arrange themselves on a stationary log without any of the group members stepping off the element. This was difficult for them because they were all strong leaders and they wanted to tell each other what to do. When there are a lot of people talking, and no one making the effort to cooperate or listen, tension soon starts to rise. When the students did begin to move they would have multiple small groups moving at once causing the other participants to become off balance and eventually falling off the log. We talked about what the issues were and realized that not everyone can be the leader and tell people what to do, it's just as important to be a follower. After a few moments of reflection the group seemed to work much better together taking turns and allowing each other to lead. The power struggle had held them back, but they overcame and progressed through the course much faster than anticipated, allowing them to complete additional elements. When it came time for the group to board the buses, the staff member's received many grunts and groans because the students were not ready to leave just yet. They finally realized how they needed to work together and that communication is not just about talking. Communication takes the form of both talking and listening, and their group learned to listen and work together.

Program: Links-Up Mentoring (GuideStar Exchange,
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
November 2013)

Budget:
--
Category:
Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served:
Children Only (5 - 14 years)
Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)
Young Adults (20-25 years) -- currently not in use

Program Description:

Links-Up is a mentoring program designed to detect and assist children who are exhibiting early signs of "at-risk" behaviors. Teachers, counselors, and principals identify children to participate in the program based on program criterion, and based on the group's need for increased awareness and improvement on a variety of issues. Each group is led by a pair of volunteer mentors, recruited from universities and colleges in the Birmingham area. The mentors are background screened, trained intensively, and then "linked-up" with small groups of children who meet one day per week for one hour each time. The volunteers conduct age-appropriate activities and lesson plans that are both fun and educational for the children. The mentoring groups offer a warm, accepting atmosphere in which children feel free to verbalize problems they are experiencing in their families, schools, and peer and community relationships. The mentors are trained to help the group explore their behaviors, feelings, and interactions with peers, and to learn appropriate ways of expressing themselves. Topics discussed in the group typically include issues related to self-awareness, teamwork, bullying, conflict resolution, decision making, social development, and family. By training college volunteers to mentor at-risk elementary and middle school youth, both the college mentors and the K-8 mentees begin thinking about a world outside of their classrooms and school walls. Links-Up Mentoring is present in schools throughout Jefferson and Shelby Counties, bringing students together who may not otherwise have the opportunity to interact. Youth development experts say that mentoring is associated with "better attendance, showing promise to prevent substance abuse, reducing some negative behaviors (i.e. fewer criminal offenses, less physical aggression), and promoting positive social attitudes and relationships." Addressing these issues in a small group setting ultimately stands to create more socially responsible youth and college students, which in turn elevates the potential for a more socially responsible and united community.

Program Long-Term Success:

By the end of 2014, Links-Up Mentoring participants' emotional awareness will increase by 5% as measured by pre and post testing.

Program Short-Term Success:

90% of program participants feel they can walk away from a situation when they know it is not good for them. 92% of program participants can solve problems without fighting or hitting when they are upset or mad. 90% of program participants feel good about themselves.

Program Success Monitored by:

Results are measured by pre and post testing.

Program Success Examples:

Program: Residential Camping (GuideStar Exchange,
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
November 2013)

Budget:
--
Category:
Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served:
Children Only (5 - 14 years)
Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)
None

Program Description:

Our programs are themed, age-specific, and unique. We believe that in order to live the camp experience, campers should be offered new opportunities each session to laugh, learn, and grow together, while developing a lifelong appreciation of, and respect for, the natural environment. Resident Camp: Overnight session offered from Sunday to Friday. Campers spend their days hiking, swimming, canoeing, learning outdoor living skills, playing sports & games, cooking over a campfire, working together, and developing life-skills. Campers vs. Wild: Campers are instructed in outdoor living skills and environmental stewardship before setting off on a three-day backpacking trek through the wilderness to have fun and seek adventure. Leaders-In-Training: A two week, overnight session. The first week is spent participating in traditional camp activities while getting to know their group and enjoying leadership activities. The second week connects the group with nature, putting their skills to the test on a three-day backpacking trip. Youth then reflect on their experience and celebrate accomplishments. Counselors-In-Training: One week of training and two weeks of service prepares youth to serve in leadership roles at camp, providing personal and professional development for transitioning from high school to college and the workforce. For developing youth, the need for physical activity and experiential learning is critical, not only to help address such health concerns as childhood obesity and ADD, but also to help increase a child's power of concentration. Through participation in Camp Fletcher's Residential Camping Program, campers are encouraged to engage their imaginations, make new friends, and explore various physical activities-all of which lend themselves to making more conscientious choices. Campers are also exposed to different personalities and taught the importance of life skills such as acceptance, tolerance, and patience. "Camp is an experiential education like no other. Children and youth learn valuable life lessons, such as independence, leadership, and self-confidence, in an environment designed specifically for them. Camp is made up almost entirely of teachable moments. Through fun and hands-on experiences, campers have opportunities to grow and develop the skills needed to be productive, successful adults," American Camp Association.

Program Long-Term Success:

Youth will understand what it means to "Thrive" as part of the Step-It-Up-2-Thrive model of development; youth will identify at least two personal strengths; youth will recognize and value teamwork; and youth will have a greater knowledge of and appreciation for nature.

Program Short-Term Success:

Campers completed surveys at the end of the week to demonstrate their understanding of what it means to "Thrive" as part of the Step-It-Up-2-Thrivemodel of development. 100% of campers increased their understanding of thriving. Actual camper comments evidencing their understanding included, "Doing your best to reach your goals; Growing, evolving, changing and becoming better; Always trying your hardest."

Program Success Monitored by:

Results will be measured by participant post evaluations and surveys and parent evaluations.

Program Success Examples:

To whom it may concern: Please accept this letter in support of the staff and programs at Camp Fletcher, and Camp Fire USA camp. My son --- has been a camper at Camp Fletcher for the past six years. In addition, last year he served as a Counselor In Training (C.I.T.) and loves the entire Camp Fletcher experience. Through the program and activities at the camp I have seen --- grow and develop a true love for the outdoors and a healthy respect for the environment. In addition to serving as a C.I.T. last year, --- was also introduced to backpacking. Since his first trip he has been on fire for the experience and looks forward to every opportunity to hike and camp. --- is a big boy that has always struggled with his weight. Through these activities he has been motivated to lose some weight and live a healthier lifestyle. This is an organization that is committed to the development of young people as highly functioning members of our society. I am convinced that any assistance they may receive would be appreciated and well-utilized. The staff at Camp Fletcher takes advantage of any and every resource available to them and works hard to instill qualities in our youth that will serve them and our country well in the future.

Program: Summer Day Camp (GuideStar Exchange,
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
November 2013)

Budget:
--
Category:
Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served:
Children Only (5 - 14 years)
Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)
None

Program Description:

Summer Day Camp meets the needs of both campers and parents alike. For campers, each week features a variety of activities centered around a specific theme. Campers are provided with experiential learning opportunities through hiking, canoeing, marksmanship, arts and crafts, teambuilding, swimming, and fishing, which keeps them active while challenging their minds and bodies. Camp Fletcher incorporates the Step-It-Up-2-Thrive theory of change into programming. Summer Day Camp counselors encourage children and youth to discover their Sparks-those hidden strengths that are discoverable in all youth. Activities develop group cohesion by helping day campers identify their common spark interests, and then seek adult guidance from a "Spark Champion." The program schedule allows parents to drop off and pick up their children outside of work hours, meeting their needs to find safe, fun, and educational experiences for the children while they're out of school for the summer. Additionally, parents have peace of mind in knowing that their children are being taken care of by well-trained staff and volunteers. Camp counselors are carefully selected, certified in First Aid & CPR, meet standard program requirements of Camp Fire and the American Camp Association, and are required to complete criminal background checks and drug screens. Summer Day Camp is principally oriented to providing programming for children during school vacation periods. Working parents need a safe environment for their children during out-of-school time under the direction of trained staff. We also know that academic retention is higher when youth are enrolled in out-of-school time programs. In addition to those benefits, day campers are exposed to the natural environment and physical activities. "Today, camp is more than a place where youth play and inherently develop positive life skills. Camp is also a place that can intentionally create active and physically healthy lifestyle habits, which helps camps become a key player in addressing childhood obesity," via American Camp Association. In her book, The Day Camp Program Book, Virginia Musselman stated: [Day camping] has its own unique contributions to make - to home and community, to education and conservation, but most of all, to childhood."

Program Long-Term Success:

A major goal of our staff is to provide each camper with a deeper understanding of the impact they have on the environment while also giving them opportunities to take initiative and perform as leaders. Since the campers attend various schools in the area and only see each other at camp, Summer Day Camp provides each camper with a chance to make new friends and develop a sense of camaraderie while working to complete tasks as a team. Through their participation in Summer Day Camp, Camp Fire also aims to help youth be more active and not rely as much on electronics, which can lead to a long-term commitment to leading a healthier lifestyle as they continue to grow and become adults. Measurable results for the coming year are: Youth will gain a deeper understanding of their impact on the environment, youth will recognize and value the benefits of teamwork, youth will demonstrate social competence, and youth will feel the site is safe and enjoyable.

Program Short-Term Success:

Youth completed surveys identifying the values of Sparks - those hidden strengths that are discoverable in all youth - which benefit teamwork, social competence, and enjoyment of life. 85% of the youth surveyed felt confident being able to find Sparks in their life.

Program Success Monitored by:

Results will be measured by utilizing participant and parent evaluations and through analysis of returning camper and staff numbers.

Program Success Examples:

Program: Self Reliance (GuideStar Exchange,
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
November 2013)

Budget:
--
Category:
Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served:
Children Only (5 - 14 years)
Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)
None

Program Description:

The Self Reliance program offers four courses: Count on Me Kids, I'm Safe and Sure, I Can Do It, and I'm Peer Proof. These courses are designed to develop and enhance children's critical thinking and decision-making skills in the area of personal safety. Program participants are introduced to the theme for each session, engage in open-ended questions/answers, and session summary. The instructional curriculum includes: puppet presentations, role play, thematic-related activities and games. In addition, special guest speakers are invited to further discuss course-related topics, as well as audio and video presentations. At the conclusion of each session, parents and teachers receive resource packets (recommended books, activities, games, and internet activities) and letters that provide additional educational information. Program participants receive a certificate of participation and a small token. Each course is delivered once per week for 7 weeks, therefore a typical unit of service is 7 sessions. "I'm Safe and Sure" (K - 1st Grade) focuses on personal safety and responsible citizenship. The course teaches children how to respond to dangerous situations, helps children feel good about themselves and their ability to cope with unexpected situations, contributes to the child's social development by reinforcing a respect for laws, and teaches children how to handle conflict without violence. "Count on Me" Kids (K - 2nd Grade) helps the young child develop a strong, positive self-image and positive character traits by emphasizing the importance of healthy lifestyles and encouraging children to do their best. "I Can Do It" (2nd - 3rd Grade) helps children learn to take more responsibility for their own care and protection. The overall purpose is to teach children self-help skills including home safety, personal safety, and family responsibility. The course is designed to prepare children to be able cope with all kinds of life situations, independent of parental or adult supervision. "I'm Peer Proof" (4th - 5th Grades) builds the self-reliance of children when involved with both positive and negative peer relationships. The course teaches assertiveness skills as a means of building positive friendships and resisting negative peer relationships.

Program Long-Term Success:

80% of the participants in the I'm Safe and Sure program will increase their awareness of feelings and how our feelings can be a warning of dangerous situations as measured by pre/post tests. 75% of participants in the Count on Me Kids program will increase their knowledge of healthy lifestyles and positive character traits as measured by pre/post tests. 80% of the participants in the I Can Do It program will increase their knowledge of healthy lifestyles and safety skills as measured by pre/post tests.

Program Short-Term Success:

100% of the students in the I'm Safe and Sure program increased in their knowledge of feelings and how feelings can be a warning of dangerous situations as measured by pre/post tests. 98.65% of the students tested in the Count on Me Kids course demonstrated understanding of positive character traits and how to build healthy bodies as measured by post tests. 97% of the students tested in the I Can Do It course demonstrated understanding of safety skills and healthy lifestyle as measured by post tests. Students tested in the I'm Peer Proof Course increased their knowledge by 60% as measured by pre/post tests.

Program Success Monitored by:

Results will be measured by pre/post surveys.

Program Success Examples:

One of the teachers stated that several students in her classroom made significant growth and development in regards to making decisions. The students used the skills learned from an I'm Safe and Sure teaching session, which focused on bullying. Students were taught to use several conflict resolution techniques to help them problem-solve conflicts that may occur with a classmate, sibling, and/or friend. The principles of "Talking it Out" to resolve a conflict situation among children and their peers was taught to students. When addressing a conflict situation, students were taught to inform an offending student that he/she does not like what was said and/or done and then ask them to stop that action. If the offending student does not stop harassing the student, then the defending student will inform that person that he/she will be reported to a trusted safety grown-up if the offending student does not stop. If the student does not stop, the defending student will seek the guidance of a trusted safety grown-up to solve the dispute. A week after the session, the classroom teacher observed several incidents where students expressed their disapproval of an act (pushing, shoving, name-calling, i.e.) and they asked the offending student to stop. If the offending student did not stop his/her disruptive behavior, then the defending student reported the offense to the teacher. By the end of that school week the teacher noticed that she spent more instructional time in her classroom, replacing approximately ten minutes that she previously used to solve conflicts among students. After reviewing and assessing the behavioral report, she discovered that one fourth of her students demonstrated that they learned how to effectively use the conflict resolution model from the I'm Safe and Sure program.
GuideStar Exchange - Gold Participant What is this?
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Impact Summary from the Nonprofit Additional Information
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Camp Fire offers development programs for approximately 11,000 children and youth of Alabama communities. Programs focus on promoting character and leadership through experience. Youth learn to make healthy and safe choices, give service, plan responsibly for the future, resolve conflicts, build positive relationships, and practice compassion. We believe in the potential of our youth as the future leaders of our community.
For more in-depth information about this organization's impact, view their Charting Impact Report.
GuideStar Exchange - Gold Participant What is this?
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.

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