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Bat Conservation International, Inc. Organization Name provided in the GuideStar Exchange* as of 02/21/2014: Bat Conservation International, Inc.

Organization Name as listed in the IRS Business Master File as of 07/14/2014: BAT CONSERVATION INTERNATIONAL INC

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AKA  BCI
Austin, TX
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GuideStar Summary

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&1002; Registered with IRS Legitimacy information is available
&1002; Financial Data Annual Revenue and Expense data reported
&1002; Forms 990 2013, 2012, and 2011 Forms 990 filed with the IRS
&1002; Mission Objectives Mission Statement is available
&1002; Impact Summary Impact Summary from the nonprofit and Charting Impact Report are available
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Basic Organization Information

Bat Conservation International, Inc. Organization Name provided in the GuideStar Exchange* as of 02/21/2014: Bat Conservation International, Inc.

Organization Name as listed in the IRS Business Master File as of 07/14/2014: BAT CONSERVATION INTERNATIONAL INC

* The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
Also Known As: BCI
Physical Address: Austin, TX 78716 2603
EIN: 74-2553144
Web URL: www.batcon.org 
NTEE Category: D Animal related
D30 Wildlife Preservation/Protection
C Environmental Quality Protection, Beautification
C30 Natural Resource Conservation and Protection
D Animal related
D31 Protection of Endangered Species
Ruling Year: 1990 
How This Organization Is Funded: Federal Grants
Private Foundation Funding
Individual Donor Contributions


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Mission Statement

Bat Conservation International’s mission is to conserve the world’s bats and their ecosystems to ensure a healthy planet.

Legitimacy Information

This organization is registered with the IRS.

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Annual Revenue & Expenses (GuideStar Exchange,
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February 2014)

Fiscal Year Starting: June 1, 2012
Fiscal Year Ending: May 31, 2013

Total Revenue $4,763,995
Total Expenses $4,386,892

Revenue & Expenses (GuideStar Exchange,
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February 2014)

Fiscal Year Starting: June 1, 2012
Fiscal Year Ending: May 31, 2013

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Balance Sheet (IRS Form 990)

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Forms 990 Received from the IRS Additional Information
IRS Form 990 is an annual document used by approximately one-third of all public charities to report information about their finances and operations to the federal government. GuideStar uses data from Form 990 to populate its database with financial information about nonprofit organizations. Posting Form 990 images on the GuideStar website is an ongoing process.

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Forms 990 Provided by the Nonprofit

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Financial Statements

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Annual Reports

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Leadership (GuideStar Exchange,
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February 2014)

Mr. Andrew Walker

Term:

Since Jan 2013

Leadership Statement:

On January 30, 2012, Bat Conservation International welcomed a new Executive Director, Andrew Walker. He is the third executive director for the more than 30-year-old organization, succeeding Nina Fascione and Founder Merlin Tuttle, who founded BCI in 1982 and built it into the world's foremost organization for bat conservation. A veteran conservationist with nearly three decades of experience in nonprofit organizations, Walker possess the necessary skills and experience to lead BCI as it designs and implements new conservation strategies, refines and strengthens its organizational capacity and raises the funds required to fulfill its mission. Prior to joining BCI, Walker worked with The Nature Conservancy as executive director of the group’s Long Island Chapter, where he co-directed the Conservancy’s first state and local legislative initiatives to protect outstanding natural areas and launched one of the Conservancy’s first “bioreserves.” He also served with the Conservancy in Arizona and as state director in Tennessee, and was director of the group’s Trustee Leadership Program for 56 Conservancy boards around the world. He has worked with partner organizations throughout the United States, Latin America and the Caribbean and the Pacific.

Board Chair (GuideStar Exchange,
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February 2014)

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February 2014)

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Officers for Fiscal Year (IRS Form 990)

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Highest Paid Employees & Their Compensation (IRS Form 990)

Highest Paid Employee data is not available for this organization.

People information was last updated by the nonprofit in February 2014

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Programs

Program: Bracken Cave Preserve (GuideStar Exchange,
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February 2014)

Budget:
--
Category:
None
Population Served:
Adults
None
None

Program Description:

Bracken Cave in the Texas Hill Country is the home of the world’s largest mammal colony—twenty million Mexican Free tail bats migrate to the site every year. Bracken Cave is on BCI-owned property and access has been limited to research staff and VIP guests for decades. The site is featured in the National Geographic documentary Strange Creatures Of The Night, the National Geographic’s Kids website and was the focus of a Kratt Brothers “Be the Creature” episode.  The Nature Conservancy identifies Bracken Cave as the world’s largest colony of mammals and the director of Boston University’s Center for Ecology and Conservation Biology calls Bracken Cave “one of the great wonders of the world.”   Bracken Cave is a maternity colony, one of the safe havens for these bats to have their single pup each summer. Adult bats weigh no more than two quarters and yet they are capable of flying at great altitude and traveling long distances. Seen individually, each bat is a marvel of engineering--and quite appealing with soft fur and tiny ears. Bears, eagles and buffalo are iconic American mammals, but a visit to Bracken inspires guests to add bats to the list.     Bracken’s acres are gradually becoming a showplace of natural, Hill Country habitat in the midst of suburban development, and the millions of young bats at Bracken will benefit from having the best conditions possible as they first learn to fly and feed. In collaboration with The Nature Conservancy of Texas, Texas Parks and Wildlife, the U.S. Natural Resources Conservation Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, we have developed a comprehensive plan for habitat restoration and management. This plan is based on decades of combined experience, including three years of on-site experimentation in which restoration approaches (and the cost and feasibility of volunteer and contracting options) have been tested. Decades of fire prevention and overgrazing have allowed an unnatural proliferation of ashe juniper which increasingly deprives young bats of required feeding opportunities and threatens the reserve’s diverse wildlife. Surrounding lands are being engulfed by urban sprawl, contributing to the urgency of our restoration efforts. While the day to day work of clearing juniper isn’t glamorous—the wildflowers that are flourishing in the open spaces are quite spectacular. The re-establishment of native grasses, oaks, and wildflowers in a mosaic of habitats throughout Bracken Cave Preserve is most notable in the springtime. Some of the native species of flowers and grasses we have planted at Bracken probably haven’t been seen in this part of the hill country in decades. Habitat restoration and management is a long-term and costly commitment, but one that is vital to protecting our planet’s largest remaining community of mammals.   

Program Long-Term Success:

Long term success at Bracken is designed to ensure the long-term security of the world’s largest remaining bat colony, the estimated 20 million Mexican free-tailed bats that live in Bracken Bat Cave, just north of San Antonio, Texas. BCI has acquired 697 acres of the surrounding ranchland since the original acres with the cave were purchased in 1992. In addition to the bat colony, the site provides habitat for endangered golden-cheeked warblers.

Program Short-Term Success:

Same as above.

Program Success Monitored by:

BCI staff.

Program Success Examples:

In collaboration with The Nature Conservancy of Texas, Texas Parks and Wildlife, the US Natural Resources Conservation Service and the US Fish and Wildlife Service, BCI has developed a series of plans for habitat restoration and management in recent years. These plans are working documents that guide property management—including guidelines for strategic cedar clearing, reseeding, controlled burns and water improvements. In addition to these plans, BCI is guided by the changing needs of the property as documented by bird counts, research projects (studying the bats, the cave and the landscape itself) and our Memorandums of Understanding with university research partners that allow for strategic use of the resources at Bracken. The habitat restoration plans allowed BCI to reestablish floral and faunal diversity, not only supporting security of the bats but also serving as a public demonstration of Hill Country ecosystem conservation. Habitat restoration at Bracken is administered from BCI’s offices in Austin, and coordinated by an on-site Bracken Manager, Fran Hutchins. The three year plan presented to The Brown Foundation was heavily collaborative, including input, volunteer help and technical assistance from The Nature Conservancy of Texas, Texas Parks and Wildlife, the US Natural Resources Conservation Service, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Bexar Grotto and Master Naturalists. Some activities, such as tree cutting and controlled burns, are contracted to local experts in these fields.

Program: White-Nose Syndrome: Threat to America's Bats (GuideStar Exchange,
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February 2014)

Budget:
--
Category:
None
Population Served:
Adults
None
None

Program Description:

White-nose Syndrome has caused “the most precipitous wildlife decline in the past century in North America,” according to biologists. It has devastated bat populations across the northeastern United States during the past four years. BCI is working with agencies, organizations and individuals to understand and stop WNS and begin restoring these decimated bat populations.  Since WNS was discovered in a New York cave in February 2006, more than 5.7 million hibernating bats of eleven species have been killed by the disease in 23 states and 5 Canadian Provinces. Mortality rates approaching 100 percent are reported at some sites. Ultimately, bats across North America are at imminent risk.

Program Long-Term Success:

Research is underway for a cause and possible solution.  Sites are being protected to minimize possible transmission issues.

Program Short-Term Success:

Same as above.

Program Success Monitored by:

BCI staff and partners.

Program Success Examples:

Program: Bats & Wind Energy (GuideStar Exchange,
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February 2014)

Budget:
--
Category:
None
Population Served:
Adults
None
None

Program Description:

Bat Conservation International supports the development of alternative energy sources. Nevertheless, there is growing concern among leading experts that cumulative impacts of wind energy development on wildlife could become unsustainable if facilities continue to operate without careful planning to minimize harm to birds and bats, both of which are ecologically essential. We believe that minimizing harmful impacts to wildlife is an essential element of “green energy” and that developers of wind energy must substantially increase efforts to improve siting and develop and test methods to reduce harm to wildlife. Additionally, state and federal agencies must increase support for responsible development of wind energy in a manner compatible with protecting wildlife resources. Cooperation, including access to study sites, funding, and transparency of information obtained, are fundamental elements needed to successfully resolve wind and wildlife conflicts.

Program Long-Term Success:

BCI and partners are testing mitigation and deterrent options at selected sites.  We are hopeful a cost-effective solution will be found and implemented by this rapidly growing industry.

Program Short-Term Success:

Same as above.

Program Success Monitored by:

BCI staff and partners.

Program Success Examples:

Program: Global Programs: Bat Conservation (GuideStar Exchange,
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February 2014)

Budget:
--
Category:
None
Population Served:
Adults
None
None

Program Description:

BCI is committed to protecting the world’s 1,300+ species of bats. Our earliest bat conservation efforts focused on protecting specific colonies of bats and abating threats at known roost sites. We helped to protect many notable bat colonies around the world in this fashion -- the Mexican Free-Tailed Bats, Tadarida brasiliensis, found under the Congress Avenue Bridge in Austin, Texas and at Bracken Bat Cave in the Texas Hill Country; a significant Gray Bat, Myotis grisescens, colony in Fern Cave, Alabama; and the world’s largest known colony of Geoffroy’s Rousette Fruit Bats, Rousettus amplexicaudatus, in the Monfort Bat Cave, Philippines, and the National Park of American Samoa -- to name a few. Many of our early strategies relied primarily on acquiring, gating caves and mines to prevent disturbance of important bat colonies. Bats, however, are highly mobile and have complex life histories and varied habitat requirements. Some species require mature forests that provide roosts in tree cavities and under bark; other species, like the African Straw-Colored Fruit Bat, Eidolon helvum, may travel each night up to 70 kilometers in one direction to visit a favorite stand of tropical fruit trees. Many species migrate, requiring conservation of critical roosting, foraging and watering habitats along their migratory routes, which can cover hundreds or thousands of miles. Effective conservation must therefore take into account each species’ unique and often complex roosting habitat requirements and the broader home ranges in which they forage and migrate. Many threats to bats also are widely distributed across the landscape. To conserve bat species effectively, BCI must work at a landscape, and in the case of migratory bats, hemispheric level.

Program Long-Term Success:

Global Conservation Goal 1: Prevent Extinctions BCI will work with partners to prevent the extinction of all species of bats, focusing initially on species listed by as Critically Endangered or Endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, which includes all of the bat species appearing on the Alliance for Zero Extinction’s list of species in imminent danger of disappearing. Global Conservation Goal 2: Protect Significant Bat Areas In collaboration with a wide array of partners, BCI will begin protecting Significant Bat Areas (SBAs) in North America, Latin America & the Caribbean, Africa and Asia-Pacific. Our SBA site conservation plans will address the lasting protection and management of critical species and their essential habitats and the abatement of serious threats, seeking breakthrough conservation strategies that can be applied at scale across multiple SBA’s. BCI will develop science-based conservation action plans for 150 SBA’s and have protected viable populations of priority bat species at 50 SBAs by 2025. Global Conservation Goal 3: Build Conservation Capacity BCI will work with partners around the world to strengthen conservation knowledge while fostering greater communication and collaboration among the world’s many bat networks, ultimately forming a unified global network covering all continents where bats occur. BCI will expand its support of promising young scientists and conservationists to foster the next generation of leadership for bats. Global Conservation Goal 4: Foster Bat-Compatible Infrastructure BCI will pursue partnerships with the World Bank and other multinational institutions, government agencies, and corporations to incorporate the conservation of bats into the funding, siting, design and management of major infrastructure development and resource extraction projects that impact bat species or Significant Bat Areas or provide an important at-scale opportunity to influence development at multiple sites or throughout an industry. Beginning in the United States and Canada, BCI will work with the wind energy industry, for example, to develop LEED-like standards for minimizing bat kills at wind turbine facilities. Global Conservation Goal 5: Promote a Balanced Approach to Bats and Human Health BCI will address at both a local (SBA) and societal scale the human health issues and related concerns (“nuisance” bats in buildings, etc.) that lead to unnecessary killing or removal of bats, developing and helping implement recommendations that minimize the potential for bat-human contact, and ensuring the use of best practices in bat conservation and management when human health issues are perceived to be present. Global Conservation Goal 6: Protect Bats on Public Lands To take its work further to scale, BCI will work with the primary agencies responsible for natural resource management on public lands, beginning in North America with the Bureau of Land Management, U. S. Forest Service, National Park Service, the Department of Defense and their Canadian counterparts. BCI will seek to incorporate bat conservation into key land management plans as each public lands plan comes up for revision. BCI will adapt this strategy to other countries and use bat conservation and management to help drive the creation of new public parks and preserves in those countries.

Program Short-Term Success:

Same as above.

Program Success Monitored by:

BCI staff and partners.

Program Success Examples:

BCI will use the following definitions refined from Key Biodiversity Area definitions to identify Significant Bat Areas: 1. Prevent Extinctions of Globally Threatened Bats, especially those listed as Endangered or Critically Endangered by The International Union for the Conservation of Nature. 2. Preserve Mega-Populations of Micro-bats and Mega-bats, including areas containing a high percentage of the total population of individual bat species (major hibernacula, roosting colonies, migratory concentrations, etc.). 3. Geographically Restricted Bats, including species with ranges that are permanently or periodically geographically restricted. 4. Protect Areas with Highly Diverse Intact Bat Communities, especially within biogeographic regions of relatively intact contiguous areas of habitat.

Program: Subterranean Programming (GuideStar Exchange,
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February 2014)

Budget:
--
Category:
None
Population Served:
Adults
None
None

Program Description:

Southwestern Subterranean programming implements multi-faceted efforts to address conservation of bats and bat habitats/roosts. Long-term conservation initiatives will benefit multiple bat species, including several imperiled bat species (pollinating and insect-eating) in this eco-region. With partners we are working at sites across the region—on private (individually held and corporate) and public lands (including US Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service and state-owned)—to protect bats and bat habitats. Bats are vital to Southwest ecosystem—yet are severely threatened, particularly by the disturbance and destruction of critical mine and cave roosts. Cavern dwelling species are especially sensitive to disturbance in maternity colony roosts. Bat Conservation International’s Southwestern Subterranean program will greatly advance the conservation and management of mine and cave roosts for the federally endangered lesser long-nosed bat, two highly vulnerable species, the California leaf-nosed bat and Townsend’s big-eared bat and several other species including the Mexican free-tailed and cave myotis. Because these bats congregate in large groups, they are very susceptible to human disturbance.

Program Long-Term Success:

Program Short-Term Success:

Program Success Monitored by:

BCI staff and partners.

Program Success Examples:

Bat Conservation International and US Borax joined forces in 2000 to identify abandoned mines important to bats and to install bat compatible gates. This effort was aimed at preventing people from entering abandoned mines while still ensuring adequate air flow and access for resident bat colonies, especially maternity colonies of Townsend's big-eared bats (Corynorhinus townsendii). Since that time, US Borax has installed numerous bat-gates and continues to monitor the response of the bats to the gates at some of the protected sites. Bat Conservation International and US Borax are continuing to work together to better understand how the bats are using US Borax abandoned mines and their relationship with extensive mine workings on other private and public lands in the region, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge and Death Valley National Park.
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Impact Summary from the Nonprofit Additional Information
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Bats make up 20% of the world's mammal species--and their numbers, diversity and range reflects their unique role and value as pollinators, pest managers and seed dispersers. Farms, forests and fields of native species benefit from the ecosystem services of bats. For almost thirty years BCI has addressed bat conservation issues ranging from the destruction of bat habitats in caves and mines to the dangers from the wind turbine industry and the growing threat of White-Nose Syndrome.   Promoting awareness of the value and vulnerability of the planet's bats is at the heart of all of our conservation programming.
For more in-depth information about this organization's impact, view their Charting Impact Report.
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