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National Association to Protect Children-Education Fund, Inc. Organization Name provided in the GuideStar Exchange* as of 06/07/2013: National Association to Protect Children-Education Fund, Inc.

Organization Name as listed in the IRS Business Master File as of 08/11/2014: NATIONAL ASSOCIATION TO PROTECT CHILDREN-EDUCATION FUND INC

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AKA  National Association to Protect Children
Knoxville, TN

GuideStar Summary

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&1002; Registered with IRS Legitimacy information is available
&1002; Financial Data Annual Revenue and Expense data reported
&1002; Forms 990 2012, 2011, and 2011 Forms 990 filed with the IRS
&1002; Mission Objectives Mission Statement is available
&1002; Impact Summary Impact Summary from the nonprofit is not available
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Basic Organization Information

National Association to Protect Children-Education Fund, Inc. Organization Name provided in the GuideStar Exchange* as of 06/07/2013: National Association to Protect Children-Education Fund, Inc.

Organization Name as listed in the IRS Business Master File as of 08/11/2014: NATIONAL ASSOCIATION TO PROTECT CHILDREN-EDUCATION FUND INC

* The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
Also Known As: National Association to Protect Children
Physical Address: Knoxville, TN 37927 
EIN: 74-3127927
Web URL: www.protect.org 
NTEE Category: I Crime, Legal Related
I70 Protection Against and Prevention of Neglect, Abuse, Exploitation
I Crime, Legal Related
I73 Sexual Abuse, Prevention of
I Crime, Legal Related
I72 Child Abuse, Prevention of
Ruling Year: 2005 


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Mission Statement

The National Association to Protect Children is a national pro-child, anti-crime membership association. We are founded on the belief that our first and most sacred obligation as parents, citizens, and members of the human species is the protection of children from harm.

Legitimacy Information

This organization is registered with the IRS.

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Annual Revenue & Expenses (GuideStar Exchange,
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June 2013)

Fiscal Year Starting: January 1, 2010
Fiscal Year Ending: December 31, 2010

Total Revenue --
Total Expenses --

Revenue & Expenses

Revenue and expense information has not been provided by the nonprofit. Click here if you are associated with this organization and want to provide this information.

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Balance Sheet (IRS Form 990)

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Leadership (GuideStar Exchange,
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June 2013)

Mr. Grier Weeks

Term:

Since Sept 2004

Board Chair (GuideStar Exchange,
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June 2013)

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Board Co-Chair

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Board of Directors (GuideStar Exchange,
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June 2013)

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Board Leadership Practices (GuideStar Exchange,
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June 2013)
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Board Orientation & Education ?
Why does this matter? Without clarity around their responsibilities and expectations, board members are not positioned to succeed. They may find themselves challenged to fulfill their governance responsibilities or frustrated by the expectations that the organization has set for them. BoardSource recommends that every new board member participate in a formal orientation process, and that all board members sign a pledge or agreement committing to their board service and to all of the responsibilities and expectations that come with service. Ideally, board members also should participate in a formal governance training program prior to serving on a board.

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?
Response Not Provided
CEO Oversight ?
Why does this matter? Oversight and management of the chief executive is one of the board’s most important legal responsibilities. The CEO or executive director is the board's single employee, and - just like any other employer/employee relationship - regular and written assessment is critical to ensuring that the chief executive and board are communicating openly about goals and performance. BoardSource recommends that boards conduct formal, written reviews of their chief executives on an annual basis, which should include an in-person discussion with the chief executive and distribution of the written evaluation to the full board.

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?
Response Not Provided
Ethics & Transparency ?
Why does this matter? A commitment to handling conflicts of interests is essential to creating an organizational culture of transparency. Boards should create and follow a policy for identifying and handling conflicts of interest, whether real or perceived. BoardSource recommends that organizations review the conflict-of-interest statement and require signed disclosures from all board members and senior staff on an annual basis.

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements within the past year?
Response Not Provided
Board Composition ?
Why does this matter? The best boards are composed of individuals who bring a variety of skills, perspectives, backgrounds, and resources to tackle the complex and strategic challenges confronting their organizations. BoardSource recommends that boards commit to diversity and inclusion by establishing written policies and practices, which include strategic and intentional recruitment of diverse board members, continual commitment to inclusivity, and equal access to board leadership opportunities.

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?
Response Not Provided
Board Performance ?
Why does this matter? Boards need to regularly assess their own performance. Doing so ensures that they are being intentional about how they govern their organization, which is a critical component of effective board leadership. BoardSource recommends that a board conduct a self-assessment of its performance a minimum of once every three years to ensure that it is staying on track with its roles and responsibilities.

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?
Response Not Provided

Officers for Fiscal Year (IRS Form 990)

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Highest Paid Employees & Their Compensation (IRS Form 990)

Highest Paid Employee data is not available for this organization.

People information was last updated by the nonprofit in June 2013

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Programs

Program: Child Rescue Program (GuideStar Exchange,
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June 2013)

Budget:
$290,000
Category:
Crime & Legal
Population Served:
Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)
Crime/Abuse Victims

Program Description:

The advent of the Internet brought about an explosion in the trafficking of child pornography. Child pornography videos and images today are not “just pictures.” They are crime scene recordings; evidence of brutal rape, torture, and abuse of children, often infants or toddlers. An estimated 1 in 3 child pornography possessors is a hands-on offender, with local victims. Yet, just when America has the ability to protect children on a massive scale for the first time in history, most of these young victims wait for a rescue that might never come. Nationwide, less than 1% of known cases are even being investigated, due to sheer lack of resources and public demand for action. However, we are changing this. The same technology used by child predators to produce and share their pornography can also be used to stop them and rescue their victims. Law enforcement has now identified hundreds of thousands of child pornography traffickers in the U.S. Moreover, investigators can now sift through hundreds of thousands of leads to predict with high degrees of success the locations of child victims waiting for help by analyzing child pornography content and trafficking patterns. The Child Rescue Program is the heart of the National Association to Protect Children. The program focuses on rescuing children from abuse by developing, deploying, and measuring advanced technology that locates predators and victims. We have forged unique relationships with law enforcement agencies across the U.S., bringing them together with top technology innovators to discover better ways to find and rescue children. The Child Rescue Program is also tracking successful rescues of children and arrests of predators. Through a national media campaign, we are educating the public on the issues of child abuse, neglect, and exploitation. To ensure the success of the Child Rescue Program, we have set multiple goals and objectives. Facilitate the development of advanced technology to detect criminals who are sexually exploiting children and rescue their victims. This will be done through partnerships with Oak Ridge National Lab, private industry, and federal, state and local law enforcement agencies. Key objectives include: new hardware and software for detecting child pornography on-scene, mini-supercomputers capable of clearing year-long forensic backlogs, advanced facial recognition software, and data analytic tools. Deploy successfully tested child rescue technologies to law enforcement agencies, increasing the number of children rescued from sexual abuse and exploitation. Key objectives include: pilot test sites established within law enforcement agencies, documentation of technology in use, law enforcement feedback and participation in research, and multi-disciplinary first-responder teams formed to identify victims. Demonstrate success of program by tracking child rescues and publicize results. Key objectives include: data on number of rescues and arrests, relationship of victim to perpetrator (e.g., family member, trusted adult, or stranger), and role of technology in making rescue possible. We will also publish successes on a national level, incorporating quarterly and annual statistics from law enforcement.

Program Long-Term Success:

The long-term goals of the Child Rescue Program are to revolutionize the way America detects and combats child sexual abuse and exploitation and to interrupt child abuse on a massive scale. Our long-term success will therefore be measured in several key ways: Widespread use by U.S. law enforcement of advanced technologies that enable the identification of child sexual predators and their victims through the detection of child abuse images and traffic; A multifold increase in local, state, and federal resources dedicated to combating child exploitation and abuse and identifying and rescuing child victims; A multifold increase in the number of child sexual predators who are arrested and removed from access to children, ensuring the protection of hundreds of thousands of current and future child victims; A systemic change in the way child sexual abuse is investigated and prosecuted in the United States.

Program Short-Term Success:

Already, the Child Rescue Program has produced numerous short-term successes, which enable donors to understand our ability to facilitate change and rescue children. Public and Private Innovators Recruited: We have initiated and facilitated partnerships between federal, state, and local law enforcement and leading technology experts in the private and public sectors. These partnerships are contributing directly and substantially to the emerging new field of “child rescue technology.” Technology Breakthroughs: Our new partnerships have already begun developing software, hardware, digital forensics, and data analytics breakthroughs that are being deployed to law enforcement and resulting in accelerated child rescues. At Oak Ridge National Lab, Child Rescue Program partners have developed new tools for on-scene investigations, faster forensic processing, pattern recognition protocols for locating child pornography producers and criminal rings, and other technologies. Increased Resources Leading to Child Rescue: Our education and advocacy efforts have led to significantly expanded government spending on child rescue. In several states and federally, our work has led to a doubling of dedicated resources, which represents a doubling of child victims rescued. In one state, the first case worked by the first officer hired with state funding advocated by the National Association to Protect Children resulted in the arrest and imprisonment of a criminal who had targeted a specific child for violent attack. First-Responder Teams: We have also worked closely with law enforcement partners to facilitate innovation in the area of first responder work. This is already leading to cross-disciplinary teams that treat child pornography possession investigations as potential child rescue investigations, speeding up the process of identifying possible victims. Accountability and Best Practices: We are also working with local governments and law enforcement agencies on pilot programs aimed at creating a coordinated response to child abuse investigations that utilizes best practices for investigating child abuse images and then using the evidence produced to ensure better prosecutions. Paradigm Shift from “Pornography” to “Child Rescue”: Across the U.S., our work has contributed substantially to a paradigm shift away from treating “child pornography” as an obscenity issue towards treating it as a human rights issue. Along the way, we have fostered increasing commitments from law enforcement agencies to focus on "child rescue" instead of "anti-child pornography."

Program Success Monitored by:

At its heart, our success is measured in predators removed from access to children and children rescued from predators. That means tracking arrests, prosecutions, and victims identified. This is done in three ways. First, volunteers and staff track news stories and reports from the field to gather valuable anecdotal information. Second, we analyze and track law enforcement statistical reporting required by the U.S. Department of Justice. Beginning in 2011, this data will include child victims identified (a requirement advocated in federal law by the National Association to Protect Children in 2008). Finally, we continue to advocate for better data collection at the state and federal levels. In addition to anecdotal and statistical assessment, we also monitor the deployment and use of new child rescue technologies by participating law enforcement agencies. This information is shared with technology researchers and innovators and is used to guide future work and set priorities.

Program Success Examples:

Since 2004, the National Association to Protect Children has brought together many of the sharpest minds in child protection. We’ve drafted and seen enacted model legislation on accountability, criminal justice policy and spending in seven states and federally, while providing policy expertise to lawmakers and policymakers. Since 2006, we have worked closely with technology innovators and law enforcement to combat the exploding problem of online child exploitation. Our victories have been featured by Larry King Live, Oprah Magazine, NPR, and many other news organizations. In December 2010, the National Association to Protect Children was able to assemble U.S. law enforcement agents and Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) computer scientists in Knoxville, TN to discuss new ventures. This face-to-face meeting was imperative to the development of new tools and technologies that are being created and enhanced. All those in attendance thought the meetings were a huge success. According to one agent, “The potential is mind-boggling; brainstorming would be a misnomer in describing the meeting we had at ORNL, it was more like a brain hurricane. Our time at ORNL was most productive and the future of this combined project will have very far-reaching effects for many years to come. I honestly believe that many a good thing will come from this effort and many a child will be spared the nightmare of child exploitation. Further I do believe that as we grow old our thoughts will be of when we came together and started down this road for the betterment of future generations.” In January 2010, the National Association to Protect Children donated a mini-supercomputer to the Knoxville Police Department (KPD) for use by law enforcement and nearby computer scientists at Oak Ridge National Lab. This computer will host advanced image analysis and facial recognition research and development, as well as provide a platform for testing accelerated digital forensics.

Impact Summary from the Nonprofit

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