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SALESIAN MISSIONS INC Organization Name provided in the GuideStar Exchange* as of 01/28/2014: SALESIAN MISSIONS INC

Organization Name as listed in the IRS Business Master File as of 06/09/2014: SALESIAN MISSIONS INC

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AKA  Salesian Missions
New Rochelle, NY
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Basic Organization Information

SALESIAN MISSIONS INC Organization Name provided in the GuideStar Exchange* as of 01/28/2014: SALESIAN MISSIONS INC

Organization Name as listed in the IRS Business Master File as of 06/09/2014: SALESIAN MISSIONS INC

* The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
Also Known As: Salesian Missions
Physical Address: New Rochelle, NY 10801 5710
EIN: 80-0522035
Web URL: www.SalesianMissions.org 
Blog URL: www.missionnewswire.org 
NTEE Category: O Youth Development
O50 Youth Development Programs
X Religion, Spiritual Development
X22 Roman Catholic
B Educational Institutions
B90 Educational Services and Schools - Other
Year Founded: 1946 
Ruling Year: 1946 
How This Organization Is Funded: Private Donations from the Public - $64,694,382
U.S. Agency for International Development, US Dept. of State, U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services for Disease Control, U.S. Dept. of State - $2,371,360
In-Kind Contributions - $18,094,043


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Mission Statement

We assist the poor and disadvantaged youth through education (academic, trade, agriculture), provide shelter, emergency and health services to marginalized populations in over 130 countries.

Legitimacy Information

This organization is registered with the IRS.

This organization is not required to file an annual return with the IRS because it is a church.

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Annual Revenue & Expenses (GuideStar Exchange,
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January 2014)

Fiscal Year Starting: January 1, 2012
Fiscal Year Ending: December 31, 2012

Total Revenue $87,447,683
Total Expenses $50,902,431

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January 2014)

Fiscal Year Starting: January 1, 2012
Fiscal Year Ending: December 31, 2012

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Balance Sheet

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Forms 990 Received from the IRS Additional Information
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Forms 990 Provided by the Nonprofit

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Financial Statements

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Annual Reports

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Leadership (GuideStar Exchange,
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January 2014)

Father Mark Hyde

Profile:

Religious Profession as a Salesian of St. John Bosco since September 1, 1971.  Ordination as a Salesian Priest since May 23rd, 1981.  College Education:  Don Bosco College, Newon, NJ, BA in Philosophy.  Post Graduated Degree:  Pontifical College Josephinum, Columbus, OH - Master of Divinity.  Previous Work Experience:  Salesian Boys & Girls Club, Columbus Ohio, Coordinator of Youth Ministry, 2007-2008, Mary Help of Christians Church & Salesian Community, NYC, NY, Pastor & Director, 2001-2007. Holy Rosary & St. John Bosco Parishes, Birmingham, AL, Pastor 2000-2001. Salesian Oratory, Birmingham, AL, Director, 1998-2001. Salesian Community of Birmingham, AL - Director, 1998-2001. Salesian Community of East Boston, MA, Director 1995-1998. Salesian Boys & Girls Club, East Boston, MA, Executive Director, 1993-1996. Salesian Boys Club, Columbus, OH, Director of Youth Services & Pastoral Volunteers, 1988-1993. Salesian Center, Columbus, OH, Director of Religious Activities & Supervisor of Field Education, 1988-1993.  Mary Help of Christians School, Tampa, FL, Coordinator of Youth Minitry, 1986-1988.  Salesian Junior Seminary, Goshen, NY, Vocation Director, 1982-1986. Salesian of St. John Bosco, West Haverstraw, NY, Vocation Team Member, 1982-1986. St. Anthony Parish, Elizabeth, NJ, Coordinator of Youth Ministry, 1981-1982. Mary Help of Christians School, Teacher of Mathematics & Career Education, 1975-1977.

Leadership Statement:

St. John Bosco, our founder, said, "without you I can do nothing," and his words still ring true today. Together we can break the terrible cycle of poverty and ignorance that destroys so many young lives. As an indispensable partner in this global effort and mission, you help us to live our Mission: "Helping others, to help themselves." And alongside the over 34,000 Salesian Priests, Brothers and Sisters in our global mission spanning 132 countries throughout the world, you brighten the lives of poor children who desperately need to know that someone cares. Our work continues to grow in size and need. With the assistance of your prayers, financial support, and in-kind donations, we are making a tremendous impact in the lives of the needy by operating orphanages, shelters, hospitals, clinics, nurseries, youth centers, parishes, and schools. Believing that poverty can only be eradicated through education, we take great pride in the accomplishments of our Elementary and High Schools, Vocational, Technical and Agricultural Schools, Colleges and Universities. It gives me great joy to know that together we have helped to make our world a better place. While the picture today is hopeful, there are many challenges ahead. If the many people you have helped through Salesian Missions could speak to you now, they would say "THANK YOU" for the chance to live a life of dignity. With your prayers and contributions, so many of God's children will know a kinder today and happier tomorrow. I assure you that we here at the Salesian Missions will be responsible stewards of your selfless gifts -- and we ask for your prayers that God will guide us as we seek to provide and assist poor children and families with what they need to become good citizens and productive member of society. To this, I add my sincere thanks and assurance of prayers. Gratefully yours, Father Mary Hyde, S.D.B.

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January 2014)

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January 2014)

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Officers for Fiscal Year (IRS Form 990)

Officers information is not available for this organization.

Highest Paid Employees & Their Compensation (IRS Form 990)

Highest Paid Employee data is not available for this organization.

People information was last updated by the nonprofit in January 2014

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Programs

Program: HIV/AIDS Prevention Education (GuideStar Exchange,
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January 2014)

Budget:
$514,057
Category:
Human Services
Population Served:
Male Youth/Adolescents (14 - 19 years)
Female Youth/Adolescents (14 - 19 years)

Program Description:

Salesian Missions's Life Choices program works to curb the devastating impact of HIV/AIDS through a powerful AB message and reinforcement of positive behavior changes during adolescence and adulthood.  Since 2005, the Life Choices flagship and programs, funded under the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief through USAID and CDC, has served to improve the lives of more than 375,000 people in the world's most affected regions.

Program Long-Term Success:

Kenya, Tanzania, South Africa Programs:  implemented the Life Choices (Health Prevention) program to reach youth with a powerful abstinence and be faithfulness message early in their lives.  Support positive behavior change through the involvement of local mentors, informed parents, & organized peer groups. Shelter and support to street children.

Program Short-Term Success:

BONDING COMMUNITIES ANDSCHOOLS Life Choices has always believed that as anorganisation we should be bridging the gapthat exists in our education system in such a waythat eventually there will no longer be a need forour services. Because in effect we would haveinspired, motivated and equipped the communityand education system enough, so that they can beself sustainable and operate effectively. Through the parental skills programme we arefinally moving closer towards this vision. This yearhas marked a remarkable change in thisprogramme. For the first time groups of parentshave been trained based in schools. In August, Life Choices worked with the firstgroup of parents at Crystal High in Hanover Parkcommunity. The input and passion that came fromthese parents were phenomenal. Life Choices’parental skills facilitator, Mrs. Desiree Amon, statedthat she was amazed at how these parents cried,laughed, and embraced change. They trulydisplayed a yearning to want to improve theirhomes, the school and the community, and theydefinitely all understood that the place to start iswith oneself. The highlight of working with this group was thegift session. Throughout the workshops parents areasked to give a gift back to their community thatwill not cost them any money. As a result theparents of Crystal high decided to take the first stepin combating the high school dropout rate. They presented the plan to the Deputy PrincipalMs. Gail Beukes, and have since obtained a list oflearners with a high level of school absenteeism.Parents have started doing home visits to find outwhere these learners are and why they havestopped coming to school. As a result, some learners have started comingback to class. Through the visits it was clear thatmany children had never experienced communityparents looking for them and for one of the firsttimes in their lives they felt that someone cared. The parents and the school are now able tomore clearly identify the reasons for the highdropout rate and together they might be able tocome-up with a plan to address the issue. Parents have also recruited a new group ofparents to join a second Life Choices Parental Skillsworkshop in Chrystal High, which is already in itsfifth session. Overall the programme has just started inCrystal High but it has already proven to beextremely successful in building a relationshipbetween parents, school, learners and communitiesat large. We look forward to hear about the futureendeavors of these two groups of parents and wewould like to thank them for their outstandinginitiative & passion. WELL DONE!

Program Success Monitored by:

Jaime Correa-Montalvo, Director Office for International Programs

Program Success Examples:

Beneficiaries that have received services since 2005: 1. South Africa: 12,996 2. Kenya: 37,000 3. Tanzania: 12,460   The work continues.

Program: Emergency Relief (GuideStar Exchange,
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January 2014)

Budget:
$160,000
Category:
Human Services
Population Served:
Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General
Immigrants/Newcomers/Refugees
Disabled, General or Disability Unspecified

Program Description:

One of the ever-growing activities Salesian Missions is emergency relief. Time and again, the Salesians have become involved in emergency efforts wherever there are victims of natural disasters, tragic circumstances or civil strife. Some of the current activity includes assisting internally displaced populations and rebuilding our schools in Haiti,   relieving famine in Africa, assisting flood victims in India, offering refugee assistance in Europe, and feeding undernourished children in the Philippines.

Program Long-Term Success:

Help the disaster stricken communities with the resources and tools to rebuild,  For example: MissionNewswire(http://missionnewswire.org/) ) An already difficult situation has become a desperate one in the Horn of Africa where aid agencies like Salesian Missions(http://salesianmissions.org/) were already hard at work helping the poor—long before the latest drought and famine that have brought the world’s attention to the region once again. “Entire communities have nothing to eat and people, many of them children, are dying,” explained Salesian missionaries serving in the Kakuma refugee camp(http://missionnewswire.org/?p=1842) in northern Kenya. More than 20,000 Somali refugees sought refuge at the camp after fleeing the political instability, hunger and overcrowding of other camps. This brings the total refugees at Kakuma to more than 50,000 with an estimated 1,000 additional Somali refugees arriving daily. In refugee camps served by Salesians in the area, more than 80,000 people are in need of assistance, according to Brother Cesare Bullo, executive director of the Salesian Planning and Development Office in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia(http://www.salesianmissions.org/our-work/country/ethiopia) . Authorities fear that this crisis could become worse than the famine of 1984-85 when more than one million people died. In response, the Salesians have organized an international fundraising initiative aimed to raise at least $850,000 to provide necessary aid for 6 months. Projects to address the urgent needs of the drought and famine victims include the repair and maintenance of existing wells, drilling of new wells, water distribution and emergency food aid. The repair and maintenance of four wells will provide a long-term water supply for 8,000 people. In additional, four new wells will be constructed. In total, it is estimated that at least 14,000 people will benefit from these new water sources. “We have located four water points that need to be rehabilitated and strengthened through the purchase of new pumps and additional excavations to find more water,” says Br. Bullo. “The new wells will be built in four areas for local communities very much in need of water at the moment. The wells need to be capable of providing a sufficient quantity of water during the droughts.” The Salesians also have a plan in the works to provide a water tracking service for water distribution in the area around Jijiga, to aid the pastoralist communities. The goal is to distribute 10-12,000 liters of water twice daily. With 1,000 new refugees arriving daily in Ethiopia(http://www.salesianmissions.org/our-work/country/ethiopia) from Somalia, Br. Bullo says it takes three to four days for them to register with UNHCR and enter the camp to receive aid. “They arrive after having walked more than 600 kilometers,” says Br. Bullo, emphasizing the urgent nature of the refugees’ needs. “We are working to distribute food outside the refugee camps while they are waiting to be registered,” he says, referring to the area of Dolo Ado in the Southern part of Somalia. “We estimate we can provide 2,000 daily rations which means 1,000 people will benefit from the daily distribution for at least three or four days before entering the camps.” Br. Bullo estimates they will help at least 10,000 people outside the camps in the first month. Salesian Missions calls on the public to make donations(http://salesianmissions.org/news/african-famine-update-salesians-respond-crisis) , as they are urgently needed to fulfill these essential life-saving projects. “So far, we have raised about a third of the needed funds and are hopeful that the remaining amount will follow as caring friends and donors learn of the crisis,” says Father Mark Hyde, director of Salesian Missions(http://salesianmissions.org/) in New Rochelle, NY. To make a donation, go to www.SalesianMissions.org(http://www.salesianmissions.org/) , click on Donate Now(https://www.salesianmissions.org/ways-to-help/donate) and select “African Famine Fund.” The Salesians specialize in assessing specific needs and identifying best possible emergency interventions to aid as many people as possible. Since they are already established in the communities working to help those in need, they are in a unique position to assess situations and respond. For example, in Ethiopia(http://www.salesianmissions.org/our-work/country/ethiopia) the Salesians operate in 14 towns, providing schools, feeding programs, housing for orphans, and HIV/AIDS intervention programs. In Kenya(http://www.salesianmissions.org/our-work/country/kenya) , the Salesians bring classrooms to refugee camps, protect youth from disease, teach agriculture skills, feed hungry children and families, and much more.

Program Short-Term Success:

Help communities around the world recover from natural disasters by assisting them with immediate relief assistance like food, shelther, medicines and clothing.  For Example: (MissionNewswire(http://www.missionnewswire.org/) ) Nearly 779,000 cases of cholera in Haiti – double the number of the United Nations’ projections – are predicted by a new study from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and Harvard Medical School. The report, published in the March 16 issue of the medical journal Lancet, also predicts 11,100 deaths from the disease. Both predictions look at the timeframe of March through November, 2011. “Educating people in Haiti about what they can do to help prevent the spread of cholera – as well as reminding people around the world of the continuing crisis – is of utmost importance,” Edson Timana, Haiti relief and reconstruction program manager for Salesian Missions(http://salesianmissions.org/) . Timana recently returned from Haiti where he saw first-hand the work being done and met with Dr. César Anthony Roody, who has been placed in charge of their cholera prevention program(http://www.salesianmissions.org/our-work/country/haiti) . Salesian Mission is currently working with schools and communities throughout Haiti to promote education and awareness efforts. These include conferences at schools, teacher training, door to door outreach and radio broadcasts. The U.N. numbers did not incorporate existing disease trends or take into account major factors like water contamination, how the disease is transmitted or even human immunity to cholera. Instead, they were based on a simple assumption that the disease would infect a set portion (2 to 4 percent) of Haiti’s population of 10 million, says study co-author UCSF medical resident Sanjay Basu, MD, in a press release. He notes that using data from Haiti’s Ministry of Health and other sources, the new study made a more sophisticated model of the spread of disease in several Haitian provinces. “The epidemic is not likely to be short-term,” adds Basu. “It is going to be larger than predicted in terms of sheer numbers and will last far longer than the initial projections.” According to the World Health Organization, to date, more than 195,000 people have been infected with cholera in Haiti(http://www.salesianmissions.org/our-work/country/haiti) , resulting in 4,000 deaths. In October of last year, the U.N. first projected that some 200,000 people would eventually become infected. Two weeks later, they doubled this projection to 400,000. These projections help determine how resources are allocated. The new study also examines the effect of making clean water more available and interventions involving vaccines or antibiotics. It notes that “a mere 1 percent reduction in the number of people forced to drink contaminated water would avert more than 100,000 cases of cholera this year and prevent some 1,500 deaths. Vaccinating about 10 percent of the population would spare about 900 lives.” The work also predicts that extending the use of antibiotics more widely would prevent 9,000 cases of cholera and 1,300 deaths. “Many of the students and community members we are working with have family members who have died or been sickened by the cholera epidemic. These people know first-hand the dangers of cholera and are very motivated to learn how they can prevent further spread of the disease by their daily actions,” says Timana. Salesian Missions(http://www.salesianmissions.org/) is currently funding a project to staff doctors and nurses for a period of two months to provide relief to the cholera victims in various communities. “We will continue to work with communities as long as we are needed. Salesians have been in Haiti since 1935, and we are committed to the long-term needs of Haiti,” adds Timana.

Program Success Monitored by:

Jaime Correa-Montalvo, Director for Office for International Programs

Program Success Examples:

In 2010, the Salesian community assisted flood victims in Pakistan.  Entire communities were underwater, and rescue workers had difficulty reaching certain areas because roads and bridges were destroyed.  Salesian missionaries arrived at refugee camps to provide a month's worth of food to each family, and students from one of the technical schools volunteered to construct new homes and deliver food and medicine to the hardest-hit areas.   Another example is our Little Schools in Haiti:   MissionNewswire) There is an old Haitian saying, “An empty stomach has no ears.” More than 2,000 elementary students and 937 vocational students are living examples of this adage in Port-au-Prince at the Little Schools of Father Bohnen, “Oeuvre des Petites Ecoles de Père Bohnen” or OPEPB in French. These students are eagerly returning to the schools, which not only provide an education, but also a nutritious meal to poor youth in Cité Soleil and La Saline. The Little Schools fight hunger and feed eager minds and spirits. “Children cannot learn if they are hungry. We are first meeting a basic need by providing what for many of the children is their only meal of the day.  At the same time, we are providing long-term inspiration through education,” says Father Zucchi Ange Olibrice, executive director of the Little Schools. The work is critical, as according to UNICEF, more than half of Haiti’s children do not attend school.  The pace of all school construction throughout the affected parts of Haiti (http://salesianmissions.org/our-work/country/haiti) has been slowed by rubble clearing and enduring issues of land tenure. However, the Salesians returned children to classrooms as soon as it was safe to do so. At first the classrooms were under trees or makeshift tents, with progress shown by the steadily growing number of eager students in attendance. Currently at the Little Schools, children study in temporary classrooms built by Salesian Missions’ own vocational students. Before the quake, there were 132 schools in operation. Today, 60 of them have resumed activities–an amazing feat considering the devastation suffered at the schools and the trauma endured by the children and teachers. The resiliency of the Haitians and the Salesians is evident throughout the schools where inventive teachers and students are finding ways to adapt to the new circumstances, which, as one can imagine, are far from ideal. “Our classrooms may be cramped and we may be lacking materials, but our students feel pride and accomplishment as they participate in the rebuilding of the school. They are learning by doing—and by sharing the resources that are available,” explains Fr. Zucchi. The Little Schools are located on the National Academy of Arts (ENAM(http://progressinhaiti.org/?p=1798) ) campus, where nearly every building collapsed during the quake.  At the time of the quake, classes were still in session and just minutes away from dismissal, when 35 seconds of shaking began. Hundreds of students were killed—many studying to become teachers. Rebuilding ENAM is a priority, according to Salesian leaders in Rome.  Plans have already been developed for a new campus with an estimated cost of $32 million. Since 1954, the Little Schools have provided an education and a nutritious meal to children in poverty. Father Bohnen, a Dutch native, was assigned as Head of the St. John Bosco elementary school in La Saline, where he encouraged local school teachers to form “little schools” for the children. His goal was to teach the children how to read, a first step in educating them.  He also invited the children attending these “little schools” to come to the St. John Bosco cafeteria where they would receive a hot lunch. He further supported these “little schools” by providing training and salary incentives for the teachers and a curriculum for all the schools. This initiative was so successful that it was extended to Cité Soleil, another slum of Port-Au-Prince during the late 1960s and continues today reaching thousands of children and families. Salesian Missions(http://salesianmissions.org/) is fully committed to rebuilding its educational infrastructure in Haiti. Since 1935, Salesians have worked to educate Haiti’s most vulnerable youth and trained the best and brightest to become teachers, leaders and Haiti’s future.

Program: Refugees & Internally Displaced People (GuideStar Exchange,
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January 2014)

Budget:
$1,371,106
Category:
Human Services
Population Served:
Immigrants/Newcomers/Refugees
Disabled, General or Disability Unspecified

Program Description:

With more than 40 million people uprooted by global conflict and persecution, Salesian Missions seeks to address their call through refugee an displacement camp care as well as systematic skills training for youth and primary wage earners responsible for the welfare of their family.  These durable solutions are reinforced by strong local and international partnerships resulting in valuable market-based training and lasting self-sufficiency.  We currently are working in Kenya, India and Colombia with refugees.

Program Long-Term Success:

A famine of massive proportions threatens 12.7 million people in the Horn of Africa(http://salesianmissions.org/news/famine-update-pictures-tell-tragic-story) who are in urgent need of emergency assistance, according to the U.S. State Department. Aid agencies continue to sound the alarm, warning that the death toll could continue to rise—possibly reaching several hundred thousand in the coming weeks alone. The reality of the situation in the Horn of Africa(http://salesianmissions.org/news/famine-update-pictures-tell-tragic-story) is unimaginable, and those working in the crisis zone struggle to provide critical information to the outside world, while also trying to save lives. The international community’s reaction to the signs of massive famine in the Horn of Africa came too late, say the Salesians of Don Bosco in Ethiopia.  Refugee camps(http://missionnewswire.org/?p=2516) throughout the region are filled with tens of thousands of people in desperate need. The camp locations are extremely remote, with workers reporting they feel isolated and cut off from the rest of the world. Warnings of a famine disaster began in December 2010 but “nobody was listening,” said Mattia Grandi, a local project coordinator for the Salesian relief efforts told EWTN News. Getting up-to-date information is a challenge even for humanitarian organizations who were already established in the famine zones, says Father Mark Hyde, executive director of Salesian Missions(http://www.salesianmissions.org/) , the U.S. arm of the Salesians of Don Bosco. “Our missionaries working in the thick of the crisis are trying their best to send reports. But as expected, they must first attend to the immediate needs of the children and adults dying of malnutrition. Every second counts.” Photographs that have made their way out of the isolated region tell stories that words simply cannot. The images are surreal, given the severe nature of the famine and the large numbers of people in desperate need of assistance. The realities of the situation are hard for anyone to process, even those who devote their lives to helping the poor and providing emergency aid. “Long lines stretch from our refugee camps,” says Fr. Hyde, describing scenes from such photographs from the five Salesian refugee camps in the region, where an estimated 150,000 people are living in in desperate need of food and water. “People of all ages waiting patiently for helit is only a matter of days or even hours before they succumb to the starvation.” Humanitarian organizations like Salesian Missions(http://www.salesianmissions.org/) are urging people to help even though the situation may be overwhelming or seemingly hopeless. Although, the death toll is expected to be large, donations can and do make a difference, says Fr. Hyde. “Many lives can still be saved, we must not be discouraged.” During recent weeks, the Salesians(http://www.salesianmissions.org/) participated in the delivery of 49 tons of food to North Horr in Kenya, consisting of 25 tons of corn, 10 tons of beans, 10 tons of fortified flour, 3 tons of rice and 1 ton of cooking fat. An additional 25 tons of food were sent to Lodwa-Turkana – including corn, beans, cooking oil, peas, flour, biscuits and powdered milk. Currently, Salesian Missions(http://www.salesianmissions.org/) is providing 2,000 food rations each day and 10,000 liters of water twice a day. An international campaign launched by the Salesians is aimed at helping almost 4 million people living in the region. Donations can be made by going to www.SalesianMissions.org(http://www.salesianmissions.org/) .

Program Short-Term Success:

MissionNewswire(http://missionnewswire.org/) ) An already difficult situation has become a desperate one in the Horn of Africa where aid agencies like Salesian Missions(http://salesianmissions.org/) were already hard at work helping the poor—long before the latest drought and famine that have brought the world’s attention to the region once again. “Entire communities have nothing to eat and people, many of them children, are dying,” explained Salesian missionaries serving in the Kakuma refugee camp(http://missionnewswire.org/?p=1842) in northern Kenya. More than 20,000 Somali refugees sought refuge at the camp after fleeing the political instability, hunger and overcrowding of other camps. This brings the total refugees at Kakuma to more than 50,000 with an estimated 1,000 additional Somali refugees arriving daily. In refugee camps served by Salesians in the area, more than 80,000 people are in need of assistance, according to Brother Cesare Bullo, executive director of the Salesian Planning and Development Office in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia(http://www.salesianmissions.org/our-work/country/ethiopia) . Authorities fear that this crisis could become worse than the famine of 1984-85 when more than one million people died. In response, the Salesians have organized an international fundraising initiative aimed to raise at least $850,000 to provide necessary aid for 6 months. Projects to address the urgent needs of the drought and famine victims include the repair and maintenance of existing wells, drilling of new wells, water distribution and emergency food aid. The repair and maintenance of four wells will provide a long-term water supply for 8,000 people. In additional, four new wells will be constructed. In total, it is estimated that at least 14,000 people will benefit from these new water sources. “We have located four water points that need to be rehabilitated and strengthened through the purchase of new pumps and additional excavations to find more water,” says Br. Bullo. “The new wells will be built in four areas for local communities very much in need of water at the moment. The wells need to be capable of providing a sufficient quantity of water during the droughts.” The Salesians also have a plan in the works to provide a water tracking service for water distribution in the area around Jijiga, to aid the pastoralist communities. The goal is to distribute 10-12,000 liters of water twice daily. With 1,000 new refugees arriving daily in Ethiopia(http://www.salesianmissions.org/our-work/country/ethiopia) from Somalia, Br. Bullo says it takes three to four days for them to register with UNHCR and enter the camp to receive aid. “They arrive after having walked more than 600 kilometers,” says Br. Bullo, emphasizing the urgent nature of the refugees’ needs. “We are working to distribute food outside the refugee camps while they are waiting to be registered,” he says, referring to the area of Dolo Ado in the Southern part of Somalia. “We estimate we can provide 2,000 daily rations which means 1,000 people will benefit from the daily distribution for at least three or four days before entering the camps.” Br. Bullo estimates they will help at least 10,000 people outside the camps in the first month. Salesian Missions calls on the public to make donations(http://salesianmissions.org/news/african-famine-update-salesians-respond-crisis) , as they are urgently needed to fulfill these essential life-saving projects. “So far, we have raised about a third of the needed funds and are hopeful that the remaining amount will follow as caring friends and donors learn of the crisis,” says Father Mark Hyde, director of Salesian Missions(http://salesianmissions.org/) in New Rochelle, NY. To make a donation, go to www.SalesianMissions.org(http://www.salesianmissions.org/) , click on Donate Now(https://www.salesianmissions.org/ways-to-help/donate) and select “African Famine Fund.” The Salesians specialize in assessing specific needs and identifying best possible emergency interventions to aid as many people as possible. Since they are already established in the communities working to help those in need, they are in a unique position to assess situations and respond. For example, in Ethiopia(http://www.salesianmissions.org/our-work/country/ethiopia) the Salesians operate in 14 towns, providing schools, feeding programs, housing for orphans, and HIV/AIDS intervention programs. In Kenya(http://www.salesianmissions.org/our-work/country/kenya) , the Salesians bring classrooms to refugee camps, protect youth from disease, teach agriculture skills, feed hungry children and families, and much more.

Program Success Monitored by:

Jaime Correa-Montalvo, Director Office for International Programs

Program Success Examples:

(MissionNewswire(http://missionnewswire.org/) ) A famine of massive proportions threatens 12.7 million people in the Horn of Africa(http://salesianmissions.org/news/famine-update-pictures-tell-tragic-story) who are in urgent need of emergency assistance, according to the U.S. State Department. Aid agencies continue to sound the alarm, warning that the death toll could continue to rise—possibly reaching several hundred thousand in the coming weeks alone. The reality of the situation in the Horn of Africa(http://salesianmissions.org/news/famine-update-pictures-tell-tragic-story) is unimaginable, and those working in the crisis zone struggle to provide critical information to the outside world, while also trying to save lives. The international community’s reaction to the signs of massive famine in the Horn of Africa came too late, say the Salesians of Don Bosco in Ethiopia.  Refugee camps(http://missionnewswire.org/?p=2516) throughout the region are filled with tens of thousands of people in desperate need. The camp locations are extremely remote, with workers reporting they feel isolated and cut off from the rest of the world. Warnings of a famine disaster began in December 2010 but “nobody was listening,” said Mattia Grandi, a local project coordinator for the Salesian relief efforts told EWTN News. Getting up-to-date information is a challenge even for humanitarian organizations who were already established in the famine zones, says Father Mark Hyde, executive director of Salesian Missions(http://www.salesianmissions.org/) , the U.S. arm of the Salesians of Don Bosco. “Our missionaries working in the thick of the crisis are trying their best to send reports. But as expected, they must first attend to the immediate needs of the children and adults dying of malnutrition. Every second counts.” Photographs that have made their way out of the isolated region tell stories that words simply cannot. The images are surreal, given the severe nature of the famine and the large numbers of people in desperate need of assistance. The realities of the situation are hard for anyone to process, even those who devote their lives to helping the poor and providing emergency aid. “Long lines stretch from our refugee camps,” says Fr. Hyde, describing scenes from such photographs from the five Salesian refugee camps in the region, where an estimated 150,000 people are living in in desperate need of food and water. “People of all ages waiting patiently for helit is only a matter of days or even hours before they succumb to the starvation.” Humanitarian organizations like Salesian Missions(http://www.salesianmissions.org/) are urging people to help even though the situation may be overwhelming or seemingly hopeless. Although, the death toll is expected to be large, donations can and do make a difference, says Fr. Hyde. “Many lives can still be saved, we must not be discouraged.” During recent weeks, the Salesians(http://www.salesianmissions.org/) participated in the delivery of 49 tons of food to North Horr in Kenya, consisting of 25 tons of corn, 10 tons of beans, 10 tons of fortified flour, 3 tons of rice and 1 ton of cooking fat. An additional 25 tons of food were sent to Lodwa-Turkana – including corn, beans, cooking oil, peas, flour, biscuits and powdered milk. Currently, Salesian Missions(http://www.salesianmissions.org/) is providing 2,000 food rations each day and 10,000 liters of water twice a day. An international campaign launched by the Salesians is aimed at helping almost 4 million people living in the region. Donations can be made by going to www.SalesianMissions.org(http://www.salesianmissions.org/) .

Program: Gifts-In-Kind & Excess Property (GuideStar Exchange,
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January 2014)

Budget:
$10,045,000
Category:
Community Development
Population Served:
Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General
Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)
General Public/Unspecified

Program Description:

Aimed at maximizing the impact of donor-assisted programs and at answering the call for emergency aid deliveries, Salesian Mission's Property and Logistics Program is carried out through generous assistance from government and private sector partners who contribute tax deductible in-kind donations and government excess property.  Millions of dollars in U.S. Government-issued excess property and corporate in-kind donations are leveraged by Salesian Missions's annual award from the USAID Ocean Freight Reimbursement Grant for humanitarian aid shipments.

Program Long-Term Success:

By providing necessary resources to help the Salesians care for the physical, spiritual, and educational needs of at-risk youth, the Property and Logistic program seeks to help young people to fulfill their God-given potential and make positive contributions to their society.

Program Short-Term Success:

The Property and Logistics Program complements the development efforts of the Salesian Missions Office for International Programs by providing critically-needed supplies not available locally or which are prohibitively expensive in host coutries.  In-kind donations allow the Saleisans to expand their reach and services to youth in need.

Program Success Monitored by:

Jaime Correa-Montalvo, Director for International Programs

Program Success Examples:

Since its inception in 1992, the Property and Logistics Program has shipped more than $85 million in educational, medical, agricultural, technical, food and other relief supplies.

Program: Food Security (GuideStar Exchange,
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January 2014)

Budget:
$2,024,940
Category:
Food, Agriculture & Nutrition
Population Served:
Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)
Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Program Description:

Salesian Missions administers youth and community feeding programs with food provided by the U.S. Government and private donors.  These progams are based on U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization research showing that undernourishment, a direct consequence of poverty and lack of food resources, affects health, well-being and the ability to be productive.

Program Long-Term Success:

According to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, there are more than 850 million people who are undernourished around the world, about half are youth. Undernourishment is a direct result of poverty and lack of food resources which affects health and well being as well as the ability to be productive. Salesian Missions food aid programs feed youth healthy meals in schools in order to reduce child malnutrition. Salesian Missions also works to improve household food availability through increased agricultural productivity. Growth and development is the sustainable and long-term way to combat poverty and provide food security.

Program Short-Term Success:

In many of the communities that we work in around the globe, the school-feeding programs that we administer provide the only hot meal a child will receive during the day.  These feeding programs at school keep children out of the child labor markets.

Program Success Monitored by:

Jaime Correa-Montalvo, Office for International Programs, Director

Program Success Examples:

In Haiti, the Breedlove program funded by USAID (United States Agency for International Development), has been one of the many donor-funded global programs operated by Salesians worlwide to secure and provide daily meals to the youth.  Breedlove took place at the Petites Ecoles of Father Bohnen, a network of 183 primary public schools including two of the most impoverished areas in the world.  Breedlove dehydrated vegetable soup blend was served with rice and beans as the daily lunch for the over 26,000 students for the entire school year, providing them the energy and daily nutrition they needed to be healthy and productive students.  Similary, other programs provide supplementary nutrition to underpriviliged youth who, in turn, are more effective furthering their education adn attaining increased school retention rates.
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Impact Summary from the Nonprofit Additional Information
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With Priests, Brothers, and Sisters numbering more than 34,000, the Salesians serve almost three million youth in over 130 countries.  The most important contribution the Salesians have made to international development is in the field of youth education.  Since its inception the Salesians have run 3,408 schools, working with over 3 million young men and women in more than 130 countries, with a focus on teaching poor disadvantaged, and street youths of all ethnic, religious, and background groups so that they may lead a healthy successful lifestyle.  There are 225 Salesian orphanages and shelters, 216 hospitals and clinics, 850 nurseries and 3,408 schools.  Of these, 559 are vocational and technical, 91 agricultural, 1,440 high schools, 23 colleges, and 1,295 elementary schools.
For more in-depth information about this organization's impact, view their Charting Impact Report.
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