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California Waterfowl Association Organization Name provided in the GuideStar Exchange* as of 05/14/2014: California Waterfowl Association

Organization Name as listed in the IRS Business Master File as of 06/09/2014: CALIFORNIA WATERFOWL ASSOCIATION

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AKA  California Waterfowl
Roseville, CA
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&1002; Registered with IRS Legitimacy information is available
&1002; Financial Data Annual Revenue and Expense data reported
&1002; Forms 990 2013, 2012, and 2011 Forms 990 filed with the IRS
&1002; Mission Objectives Mission Statement is available
&1002; Impact Summary Impact Summary from the nonprofit is available
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Basic Organization Information

California Waterfowl Association Organization Name provided in the GuideStar Exchange* as of 05/14/2014: California Waterfowl Association

Organization Name as listed in the IRS Business Master File as of 06/09/2014: CALIFORNIA WATERFOWL ASSOCIATION

* The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
Also Known As: California Waterfowl
Physical Address: Roseville, CA 95678 
EIN: 94-1149574
Web URL: calwaterfowl.org 
NTEE Category: C Environmental Quality Protection, Beautification
C32 Water Resource, Wetlands Conservation and Management
D Animal related
D60 Other Services
D Animal related
D60 Other Services
Year Founded: 1945 
Ruling Year: 1980 


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Mission Statement

California Waterfowl is a statewide 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to conserve California’s waterfowl, wetlands, and our hunting heritage. Our goals include (1) generating sufficient abundance and dispersion of waterfowl throughout California and the Pacific Flyway; and (2) sustaining hunting through protection, opportunity, training, and education. California Waterfowl was founded in 1945 to influence hunting regulations and government activities that affect waterfowl in California. In the early 1980’s, we recognized that the challenges faced by our founders had greatly expanded. In 1985, California Waterfowl initiated waterfowl studies in partnership with the California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG) to determine the factors that limit waterfowl populations in California and the Pacific Flyway. Study results provided the basis for targeted habitat enhancement projects that began in 1989. By 1991, the Association had begun introducing youngsters to hunting & the outdoors through educational outreach programs. California Waterfowl uses three core departments including; Conservation Programs, Fund and Membership Development, and Public Policy to accomplish our mission of conserving California's waterfowl, wetlands, and our hunting heritage. Conservation Programs, including waterfowl, wetlands, and education, focus on waterfowl population monitoring and the protection, restoration, enhancement, and stewardship of wetlands, riparian, and grassland habitats. To achieve our overall mission, our educational messages promotes to hunters and non-hunters alike, proper stewardship, responsible hunting as a link to nature, the outdoors, conservation, and a healthy and sustainable environment. Public Policy concentrates on legislative, regulatory, and administrative policy decisions that affect waterfowl, wetlands and our hunting traditions. The Fund and Membership Development Department’s objective is to enhance and promote California Waterfowl’s mission by increasing membership and funding support for the Association and the many programs that California Waterfowl offers. These departments act on the best available science, and when combined, these core strengths provide specialists in habitat, waterfowl population dynamics, political advocacy, and public education. This balanced approached allows California Waterfowl to serve as a single and strong voice for waterfowl enthusiast and conservationist alike. The delivery of our mission to our 18,500 members requires the use of extensive partnerships and a large network of active volunteers. California Waterfowl believes that people and wildlife both suffer when a “leave it alone” philosophy attempts to separate humans from nature. Instead, we believe that the best way to build stewardship values is to participate in nature, resulting in mutual benefits for both wildlife and humans. We maintain that this is why hunters have served as such strong leaders in the conservation of waterfowl and wetlands. California Waterfowl has protected, restored, or enhanced more than 430,000 acres to provide wildlife habitat for millions of birds and animals. Projects deliver the full range of habitat requirements for waterfowl and more than 200 other species of wildlife. Interactive programs have introduced more than 275,000 children to the wonders of the great outdoors. California Waterfowl finds its strength in a set of clear core values. These values define our organization and guide us in our hunt for a better California. Stewardship: Finding Common Ground California Waterfowl serves as a bridge to connect hunters and non-hunters, public and private interests, young and old toward a common goal of conserving and enjoying our natural resources. By building strong partnerships and family involvement, the Association is connecting with Californians of all interests to inspire stewardship of our wetlands and wildlife resources. Heritage: Hunter Driven California Waterfowl believes that hunting deeply connects people to the natural world and generates the knowledge and commitment to conserve our treasured resources. This passion for active involvement in nature motivates hunters to make vital investments in conserving California for our children and grandchildren. Education: Focused on the Future California Waterfowl stimulates youths and adults to value waterfowl and wetlands through unique outdoor exploration, hands-on learning, and active conservation. These experiences have the power to introduce new family traditions for getting outdoors and result in a legacy of abundant wildlife and healthy habitats for future generations. Advocacy: Results Oriented California Waterfowl is an influential force advocating for healthy wetlands, waterfowl, &the preservation of the hunting lifestyle. The Assoc. brings together passionate people who rely on science while taking innovative actions to benefit California.

Legitimacy Information

This organization is registered with the IRS.

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Annual Revenue & Expenses (GuideStar Exchange,
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May 2014)

Fiscal Year Starting: April 1, 2012
Fiscal Year Ending: March 31, 2013

Total Revenue $24,515,871
Total Expenses $13,288,137

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May 2014)

Fiscal Year Starting: April 1, 2012
Fiscal Year Ending: March 31, 2013

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Balance Sheet (IRS Form 990)

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Leadership (GuideStar Exchange,
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Mr. John D. Carlson, Jr.

Profile:

John Carlson, Jr. has been President of the California Waterfowl Association (California Waterfowl) since 2010.  He was originally hired by California Waterfowl in 1987 as a field biologist, under the guidance of California Waterfowl’s former President, Dr. Robert McLandress.  After 21 years with the California Department of Fish and Game’s Wildlife Program’s Branch and most recently as the Executive Director of the California Fish and Game Commission, John returned to become California Waterfowl’s President.  His background includes work with government and private organizations.  Education: B.S. in Wildlife Management, Humboldt State University and M.S. in Wildlife Ecology from Iowa State University.  John studied pintail in the heart of the Prairie Pothole region with leading scientists from the US Fish and Wildlife Service.  His resulting Master’s thesis was one of the first attempts to use computers to model breeding pintail.

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Board Co-Chair

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May 2014)
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Board Orientation & Education ?
Why does this matter? Without clarity around their responsibilities and expectations, board members are not positioned to succeed. They may find themselves challenged to fulfill their governance responsibilities or frustrated by the expectations that the organization has set for them. BoardSource recommends that every new board member participate in a formal orientation process, and that all board members sign a pledge or agreement committing to their board service and to all of the responsibilities and expectations that come with service. Ideally, board members also should participate in a formal governance training program prior to serving on a board.

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?
Yes
CEO Oversight ?
Why does this matter? Oversight and management of the chief executive is one of the board’s most important legal responsibilities. The CEO or executive director is the board's single employee, and - just like any other employer/employee relationship - regular and written assessment is critical to ensuring that the chief executive and board are communicating openly about goals and performance. BoardSource recommends that boards conduct formal, written reviews of their chief executives on an annual basis, which should include an in-person discussion with the chief executive and distribution of the written evaluation to the full board.

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?
Yes
Ethics & Transparency ?
Why does this matter? A commitment to handling conflicts of interests is essential to creating an organizational culture of transparency. Boards should create and follow a policy for identifying and handling conflicts of interest, whether real or perceived. BoardSource recommends that organizations review the conflict-of-interest statement and require signed disclosures from all board members and senior staff on an annual basis.

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements within the past year?
Yes
Board Composition ?
Why does this matter? The best boards are composed of individuals who bring a variety of skills, perspectives, backgrounds, and resources to tackle the complex and strategic challenges confronting their organizations. BoardSource recommends that boards commit to diversity and inclusion by establishing written policies and practices, which include strategic and intentional recruitment of diverse board members, continual commitment to inclusivity, and equal access to board leadership opportunities.

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?
Yes
Board Performance ?
Why does this matter? Boards need to regularly assess their own performance. Doing so ensures that they are being intentional about how they govern their organization, which is a critical component of effective board leadership. BoardSource recommends that a board conduct a self-assessment of its performance a minimum of once every three years to ensure that it is staying on track with its roles and responsibilities.

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?
No

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Programs

Program: Waterfowl and Wetlands (GuideStar Exchange,
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May 2014)

Budget:
$6,765,089
Category:
Animal-Related
Population Served:
Adults

Program Description:

·        With the goal of sustaining and/or increasing waterfowl populations, Waterfowl and Wetland Projects focus on increasing and improving habitats that are critical to waterfowl.  Because restoring and enhancing habitat through upland and wetland restoration projects has been determined to be most important conservation effort to sustain and increase waterfowl populations, California Waterfowl will continue these efforts using a variety of federal, state, and private partnerships.      ·        California Waterfowl will perform project evaluations, conduct breeding waterfowl surveys, and assist state and federal agencies in determining annual survival, harvest distribution, and local production through banding of mallards and pintails.      ·        California Waterfowl is working with farmers to encourage activities that protect nesting mallards and promote egg salvage when no other alternatives are possible.      ·        California Waterfowl will continue to work with farmers, universities, wetland managers, and other partners to reconsider traditional management strategies in an effort to develop more cost effective practices.        ·        California Waterfowl will continue to be a major contributor to the development of “wildlife- friendly” farming, the Walking Wetlands Pilot Program, and the Wetlands Reserve Program in the Klamath Basin and intermountain region.  California Waterfowl will continue to play a large role in marketing and implementing this unique habitat protection, restoration, and enhancement project and will seek to implement similar programs throughout California     ·        California Waterfowl runs one of the most cost effective, yet highly productive conservation programs in North America, the California Wood Duck Program (CWDP).  A network of volunteers work with staff to install and monitor nest boxes across the state to produce more than 30,000 ducklings each year.  California Waterfowl would like to increase the number of volunteers and the number of boxes enrolled in the program.      Because of unstable funding sources, California Waterfowl has begun searching for alternative methods to create and manage wetland habitat.  We will actively seek land acquisitions, easements and endowments to not only protect threatened habitats but also help create some level of sustainable wetland habitat management.

Program Long-Term Success:

Program Short-Term Success:

One of this department’s main goals is to sustain and/or increase waterfowl populations.  Habitat projects focus not only wintering habitat, but spring and fall staging habitats, as well as breeding habitats to benefit all habitats important to waterfowl throughout their entire annual life cycle.  Rebuilding habitat through upland and wetland enhancement projects has been determined to be most important method to sustain and increase waterfowl populations.  California Waterfowl will continue these efforts using a variety of federal, state, and private partnerships.  The most critical challenge is to restore 80,000 acres of mallard breeding habitat over a 10-year period (2003 – 2013).  This goal was developed because it replaces the acreage displaced when rice “set-aside” programs were discontinued during the late 1980s.  The upland nesting areas created in the set aside fields provided critical nesting habitat for mallards and other ground nesting birds such as pheasants.  Even with this aggressive goal, continued losses from urban development demand that we make every effort to add even more breeding habitat and/or enhance existing habitats to increase waterfowl production.  From 1988-2006, nearly 100,000 acres succumbed to urban development, further reducing available mallard breeding habitats.      As California Waterfowl has done since 1985, Waterfowl and Wetland Projects will assist CDFG, USFWS, and other agencies monitor waterfowl populations through a variety of different methods.  We will continue to implement, monitor, study, and revise cover-crop programs to provide upland nesting sites for waterfowl and other grassland-nesting birds in Northern California.  The results from these endeavors will provide valuable insight on mallard production in the rice growing regions of the north Sacramento Valley and will hopefully influence policy makers to incorporate such programs in the Farm Bill and other conservation program appropriations.      Scientific studies have shown that the best way to determine annual survival, harvest distribution, and local production is through banding.  Thus, California Waterfowl will continue to assist in this area by launching banding operation for mallards, pintail, wood ducks, and egg salvage birds.  In response to the USFWS’s offer to use scientific evidence in determining pintail harvest regulations, California Waterfowl has implemented pre and post season pintail banding.  In addition to our local efforts, we intend to support pintail banding crews on the Canadian prairies where large numbers of pintail can be capture at a relatively low cost.  The focus on pintail banding is necessary since pintail annual survival rate estimates are derived from a small sample of banded birds and their precision is quite low and may not accurately reflect “real life” parameter values.       As such, California Waterfowl continues to lead efforts to reestablish pre- and post-season pintail banding to bolster banding sample size and improve the precision of the estimates from banding data.  Based on available evidence, however, California Waterfowl’s position remains that hunting has little if anything to do with changes in the breeding population of pintails; and although this may sound counter intuitive, these changes are most likely due to long term drought and habitat losses in the Western Canadian prairies and possibly nutritional deficiencies associated with migration staging habitats and their cross-seasonal effects on breeding success.  Because of this we will continue to support efforts to improve pintail body conditions within migration and wintering areas of the Pacific Flyway and we will look for ways to assist our partners working in the primary pintail breeding areas of North America.

Program Success Monitored by:

·        Increase upland nesting cover for mallards using existing government programs(such as Environmental Incentives Quality Program, Conservation Securities Program, Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program, Wetland Reserve Program, Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program, Inland Wetlands Program, Duck Stamp Program, etc.), increasing the amount of upland acres on wetland restoration projects, working with partners to create new programs such as the walking wetlands/uplands and rice rotation program, and developing innovative wildlife-friendly agricultural programs.      ·        Continue wetland, upland, and riparian restoration and enhancements in the Sacramento Valley, Yolo Bypass, Grasslands Ecological Area, northeast California, Klamath Basin, Suisun Marsh, San Joaquin Valley, Tulare Lake Basin, Imperial Valley, and southern California through partnerships with the USFWS, CDFG, State Wildlife Conservation Board, CDFG, Natural Resources Conservation Service and USFWS, and others.  Grant funding will be sought from the North American Wetland Conservation Act, California Duck Stamp, Wildlife Conservation Board, private foundations, and others.      ·        Perform Project Evaluations     o   Conduct breeding waterfowl surveys in conjunction with the CDFG.      o   Assess the response of mallards to upland nesting cover programs.     o   Assist state and federal agencies in determining annual survival, harvest distribution, and local production through preseason banding of mallards and pre- and post-season banding of pintails.      o   Use midwinter waterfowl surveys conducted by the CDFG and USFWS to examine waterfowl and more specifically, pintail distribution in winter.     o   Examine restored and enhanced habitats to determine waterfowl use and benefits to other wildlife.     o   Analyze recent habitat loss due to urbanization and its affect on California’s waterfowl populations.     ·        Work with farmers, universities, wetland managers, and other partners to improve habitat management practices with the goal of maximizing wetland values on a limited number of acres and with limited resources.      ·        Continue to work with the agencies and landowners to market and further develop and increase acreage enrolled in the Walking Wetlands Program and other “wildlife- friendly” farming programs through the Farm Bill and other government programs.     ·        Increase the number of volunteers and the number of boxes enrolled in the California Wood Duck Program, while at the same time providing hands on environmental education for both children and adults interested in conservation and wildlife management      Secure permanent habitat protections and stable funding sources for habitat management through the receipt of land, easements and endowments which will allow California Waterfowl to help create some level of sustainable wetland habitat management and provide demonstration projects to conduct research and educate wildlife managers.

Program Success Examples:

·        Habitat     o   Track wetland, upland, and riparian project accomplishments for number of projects, dollars spent, acres created, enhanced, and restored by region and habitat type.  The partnerships that were involved to complete these projects will also be noted.      o   Work with farmers, universities, wetland managers, and other partners to improve habitat management techniques and create efficiencies through science, with the goal of maximizing habitat productivity with limited resources.      o   Work with agencies, volunteers, and landowners to market, further develop, and to increase the amount of acreage enrolled in wildlife friendly farming programs such as the Walking Wetlands Program as well as provisions in the Farm Bill.      ·        Perform Project Evaluations     o   Conduct breeding waterfowl surveys in conjunction with the CDFG.     o   Analyze data from breeding waterfowl surveys and report results to state and federal agencies, partners, and our membershianalyze nest success, and nest density to determine how well habitats have affected mallard and other wildlife use and to modify future management strategies.      o   Assist state and federal agencies in determining annual survival, harvest distribution, and local production through preseason banding of mallards and pre- and post-season banding of pintails.      ·        Increase the number of volunteers and the number of boxes enrolled in the California Wood Duck Program.  Document the total number of ducklings hatched each year.      ·        Provide opportunities for hands on environmental education for both children and adults interested in conservation and wildlife management through activities such as wood duck nest box checks and banding days.      ·        Increase the number of land holdings, easements and endowments held by California Waterfowl.  Secure stable funding sources for habitat management through the receipt of easements and endowments which will allow California Waterfowl to help create some level of sustainable wetland habitat management over the long term.

Program: Heritage Programs (GuideStar Exchange,
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May 2014)

Budget:
$878,016
Category:
Public, Society Benefit
Population Served:
Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Program Description:

·        California Waterfowl will introduce nature and recreation through in-class presentations, field trips, teacher resources, publications, festival exhibits, adventure days, and more.     ·        We will provide intensive hands-on skill-building through hunter education camps, conservation camps, youth waterfowl banding days, shooting clinics, junior hunts, restoration projects, and other exciting outdoor experiences.     ·        California Waterfowl intends to instill the values of stewardship and service into the next generation of waterfowl enthusiasts through fellowships, internships, service learning opportunities, volunteering, and teaching the teachers.     Several years ago California Waterfowl hired a fulltime staff member to assist with what had been a volunteer run hunter education program.  This program focuses on children and provides them with unique and affordable opportunities to learn skills necessary to become conservation minded hunters.  For the Conservation Programs – Education Projects our efforts to educate, recruit, and retain the next generation of hunter conservationists.

Program Long-Term Success:

It is the Education staff’s responsibility to help ensure the future of waterfowl hunting in California, not through the same means as Public Policy (legislative protections), but through training, education, and increased opportunities.  To accomplish this, we will work to introduce nature and recreation through scholarships, in-class presentations, field trips, teacher resources, publications, festival exhibits, and adventure days.  These teachings are designed to inspire Californians of all ages to get outdoors, learn about wildlife, discover new recreational interests, and help with conservation.      The Association’s education projects will directly and indirectly promote the benefits of hunting to thousands of youths and their families statewide.  California Waterfowl will team with partners to complete a variety of educational events and share resources.  Our school programs will provide a balanced message of wise use of natural resources.  Programs will include several elements: (1) loanable Wild About Wetlands resource kits that are available at no cost to teachers across northern California; (2) educational resources such as posters, calendars, bookmarks, hands-on exhibits and other materials that share conservation education with students from kindergarten through college; (3) classroom presentations and field trips that provide real-world application for textbook lessons and meet state curriculum standards; (4) workshops to facilitate teachers presenting balanced messages to students; (5) youth leadership training and service-learning for teens, interns and volunteers, using wetlands as the theme; (6) partnership work to develop an education center on Grizzly Ranch and potentially in the Chico area at Rancho Esquon; (7) scholarships and research support to wildlife management students and post graduates working waterfowl related studies.      Our Education programs uniquely immerse youths in nature through experiences that reveal our human role as both harvester and restorer.  And, we involve all the senses whenever possible in order to fully engage youths.     For youth who might be interested in learning outdoor sports and becoming hunters, we will be offering hands-on skill-building through (1) overnight hunter camps that include state-approved hunter safety education; (2) Outdoor Adventures Days and clinics with hands-on recreation and conservation activities; (3) youth shooting clinics that build skills and reinforce safety; (4) junior and first time hunts that help get youths and new hunters started in a fun and safe environment; and (5) restoration projects, such as tree planting, wood duck box building events and youth banding activities.  We will also support more than a dozen public and private area junior hunts to provide quality field experiences that motivate juniors to stay involved in hunting.  These events focus on providing attendees with unique and affordable opportunities to learn skills necessary to become conservation minded hunters.      California Waterfowl will provide opportunities to facilitate stewardship and service through fellowships, internships, service learning opportunities, volunteering, and teaching the teachers.  We will also offer an art camp for high school students and investigate opportunities to host wildlife biology, wood duck, and junior chef camps.  The Association will also work to expand the Women’s Outdoor Connections Initiative, which was launched in early 2008.      Our partner facilities bring a unique element as they are either public access lands or privately owned wetlands where landowners have made significant personal investments in restoration and serve as conservation examples.  This is where youth and their families view the wonders of the great outdoors and begin to nurture lifelong stewardship values.  These real life examples greatly improve our ability to educate, recruit, and retain the next generation of hunter conservationists.

Program Short-Term Success:

·        Educate our members and the general public about nature, recreation and the value of habitat for waterfowl and other wetland and upland dependant wildlife through in-class presentations, field trips, teacher resources, publications, festival exhibits, adventure days, and more.      ·        Provide intensive hands-on skill-building through hunter education camps, conservation camps, youth waterfowl banding days, shooting clinics, junior hunts, restoration projects, and other exciting outdoor experiences.  Recruit and retain new waterfowl hunters and future conservationists.      ·        Facilitate stewardship and service into the next generation of waterfowl enthusiasts through scholarships, fellowships, internships, service learning opportunities, volunteering, and teaching the teachers.  Promote messages of wise use of our natural resources and the benefits of hunting to non-hunting audiences to generate support for the continuation of hunting and associated conservation efforts.

Program Success Monitored by:

·        Introduce nature and recreation through in-class presentations, field trips, teacher resources, publications, festival exhibits, adventure days, and more.      o   Educate members and the public about the value of habitat for waterfowl and other wetland and upland dependant wildlife.      o   Assess school programs using pre/post testing, assignments such as journaling and worksheets, and written evaluation forms completed by teachers, students, and volunteers.     o   Evaluate recreational projects using observation and written surveys completed by juniors, presenters, parents, and staff.  Periodic follow-up will measure participants’ ongoing involvement in recreation.     o   Track and evaluate project participation, age and gender statistics, partnerships, and regional event distribution.      o   Debrief after events through meetings and phone interviews with staff and volunteers.  Challenges faced with each of the projects will be evaluated for improvement alternatives, which will be incorporated into future projects.     ·        Provide intensive hands-on skill-building through hunter education camps, conservation camps, shooting clinics, junior hunts, restoration projects, and other exciting outdoor experiences.      o   Ensure that novice hunters learn recreational skills, receive instruction and reinforcement of firearm safety, and get involved in conservation and stewardshifellowships, internships, service learning opportunities, volunteering, and teaching the teachers.      o   Promote messages of wise use of our natural resources and the benefits of hunting to non-hunting audiences to generate support for the continuation of hunting and associated conservation efforts.

Program Success Examples:

During FY 2010/11, Education Projects focused on qualitative experiences and recreation.  Because of workforce and budget reductions, our outreach efforts were further reduced from the previous year.  Despite this, roughly 11,000 people participated in a variety of in-classroom and outdoor programs.     The value of wildlife habitat conservation and the critical role that hunters play was demonstrated to nearly 5,300 students through field trips, classroom presentations, hands-on projects, and more.      Camps, shoots, clinics, junior hunts, and other outdoor adventures provided quality outdoor hunting and shooting experiences to 1,255 youths and an additional 1,530 adults.      College Student Hunter Camp:  This one of a kind camp provided an exciting opportunity to15 UC Davis students destined to become wildlife managers who had no firsthand experience with hunting.     College Chapters:  College students at Humboldt State University and Chico State University had opportunities to build their wildlife-related experience through California Waterfowl student chapters.  Chapter members were involved in several local projects, including egg salvage, outdoor adventures days, nest box checks, field trips, and trainings.  Projects included tree planting, youth days, and nest box checking.      Youth Banding:  The Banding with Youth Program provided hands on waterfowl research and field experience to seven Wildlife Biology college students and 32 youth in partnership with UC Davis, Conaway Ranch, and the Community Youth Center.      Art Camp:  Twelve high school students spent three days at Art Camp hosted at the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge in partnership with Pacific Flyway Decoy Association studying waterfowl biology,  the refuge system, Junior Duck Stamps, and learning from professionals about Photoshop, wildlife photography, field sketching, decoy carving, hunters as conservationists, duck calling, how to process a duck, and more.     Nature Bowl:  California Waterfowl staff led activities for 165 students in 2010.  We worked with Yolo Basin Foundation to host a regional Nature Bowl competition for third to sixth grade students.  This cooperative team competition uses activities to teach local and regional environmental science issues.  Student teams are coached by teachers or parents and represent their school in the regional semi-finals and finals each spring.     Raveling Scholarship: California Waterfowl continued to administer the Dennis Raveling Scholarship Fund.  Grant funding is awarded annually to student(s) with a desire to pursue a career in waterfowl or wetlands ecology.  Awards are based on the candidate's resolve, high academic achievement, and project merit.  Candidates must be pursuing an advanced university degree in: Wildlife, Zoology, Botany, Ecology, or other pertinent biological science.  In 2010, we received 10 applications and two scholarships were awarded.     Peter Fast – 1st place ($1000), Project Study – Identify factors affecting migratory behavior to better evaluate how migrants may respond to different climate change scenarios.     Brandt Meixell – 2nd place ($500), Project Study – Assess the prevalence and demographic effects of low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) in waterfowl, and it is the first of its kind in North America.  This research project aims to answer three specific questions; 1) how does LPAI infection in waterfowl vary within and among years relative to LPAI subtype, species, age, sex, and geographic locations of their waterfowl hosts, 2) does LPAI infection pose any fitness consequences on body condition, survival, or reproduction in wild waterfowl, and 3) through what mechanisms is LPAI maintained in waterfowl populations.      Junior Duck Stamp:  California Waterfowl continued to administer the California Junior Duck Stamp Program including maintaining the program website - www.calwaterfowl.org/duck_stamp/index.htm.  We coordinated the printing and distribution of 5,000 calendars, 2,000 book marks, 2,000 waterfowl identification cards.  Materials were distributed to almost 700 schools, nature centers, and partner groups.  Staff gave 142 classroom presentations to 3,208 students who returned 1,762 art entries for the annual competition which is typically held in March of each year.  One hundred winning students and schools receive prizes ranging from art supplies and ribbons to binoculars and savings bonds.  Winning students and their families are invited to attend a recognition ceremony at the Pacific Flyway Decoy Association’s Wildlife Art Festival held in July.      Rancho Esquon Campus:  California Waterfowl is partnering with Community Youth Center (CYC) to hold educational programs at its Rancho Esquon Campus in Durham.  We gave classroom presentations to introduce topics such as wildlife-friendly agriculture, waterfowl biology, migration, and wetlands conservation.  These were followed by field trips so students could explore the outdoors through a series of hands-on activities, including egg salvage and wood duck nest boxes.  In all, nearly 1,200 students enjoyed programs at Rancho Esquon.  For more information, please see the attached Hofmann Family Foundation Final Report for the Program Year 2010.     Marsh Madness Youth Days:  Field trips to local wetlands included lessons where students broke into small groups to learn about wetland soils, aquatic invertebrates, and animal signs (tracks, bones, trails, etc.).  During walking safaris, students observed wetland plants and animals, learned bird identification techniques, used binoculars and field guides, and handled bird mounts while learning about the unique features of the area they were visiting.  Students recorded their experiences in field journals and practiced sketching some of the organisms they discovered.  An afternoon wrap-up activity involved everyone working in teams to simulate a community restoring a wetland.  In the end, the youngsters learned that creating a wetland requires a great deal of cooperation, as well as money, scientific expertise, and motivated individuals of all interests.  In 2010, 176 youngsters participated in Marsh Madness events.      Wild About Wetlands School Kits:  We maintained over 60 wetlands kits that were used by upper elementary teachers in 15 Northern California counties: Butte, Contra Costa, El Dorado, Glenn, Humboldt, Lassen, Placer, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Shasta, Solano, Sonoma, Sutter, Yolo, and Yuba.  The kits provide three weeks of lessons on wetlands, wildlife, and habitat restoration.  They incorporate subjects such as math, English, history, social studies, and science.  Based on information from loan sites, an estimated 8,000 students studied wetlands and conservation topics from the Wild About Wetlands kits.  Staff continues to monitor and evaluated kit activities with regard to the state-mandated Education and the Environment Initiative (EEI).  However, we do not expect to update the kits in the near future due to limited education staff and program funding.     Festival Exhibits:  Displays included California Waterfowl magazines and informational brochures, animal artifacts and activities that addressed hunting and conservation topics, including wood duck and mallard biology.  Visitors received educational bookmarks, identification cards, posters, event calendars, and nest box plans.  An estimated 4,000 to 5,000 people stopped by our informational booths.

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May 2014)

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