Title here

Text here
 

Freedom From Hunger Organization Name provided in the GuideStar Exchange* as of 06/13/2012: Freedom From Hunger

Organization Name as listed in the IRS Business Master File as of 06/09/2014: FREEDOM FROM HUNGER

* The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.

 
Davis, CA
GuideStar Exchange - Silver Participant What is this?
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.

GuideStar Summary

&1002;                GuideStar Exchange Committed to transparency ?
This organization is a Silver-level GuideStar Exchange participant, demonstrating its commitment to transparency.

Is this your nonprofit? Update your information today!
&1002; Registered with IRS Legitimacy information is available
&1002; Evidence of Impact Expert Assessment and Reviews available
&1002; Financial Data Annual Revenue and Expense data reported
&1002; Forms 990 2013, 2012, and 2011 Forms 990 filed with the IRS
&1002; Mission Objectives Mission Statement is available
&1002; Impact Summary Impact Summary from the nonprofit is available
  5 stars Average rating from 15 Personal Reviews | Write a Review

Basic Organization Information

Freedom From Hunger Organization Name provided in the GuideStar Exchange* as of 06/13/2012: Freedom From Hunger

Organization Name as listed in the IRS Business Master File as of 06/09/2014: FREEDOM FROM HUNGER

* The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
Physical Address: Davis, CA 95617 
EIN: 95-1647835
Web URL: www.freedomfromhunger.org 
NTEE Category: Q International, Foreign Affairs, and National Security
Q32 International Economic Development
None
None
Ruling Year: 1947 


Sign in or create an account to see this organization's full address, contact information, and more!

Mission Statement

Freedom from Hunger brings innovative and sustainable self-help solutions to the fight against chronic hunger and poverty. Together with local partners, we equip families with resources they need to build futures of health, hope and dignity.

Legitimacy Information

This organization is registered with the IRS.

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Institutional funders should note that an organization’s inclusion on GuideStar.org does not satisfy IRS Rev. Proc. 2011-33 for identifying supporting organizations.

Learn more about GuideStar Charity Check, the only pre-grant due diligence tool that is 100% compliant with IRS Rev. Proc 2011-33.

GuideStar Exchange - Silver Participant What is this?
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.

Annual Revenue & Expenses (IRS Form 990, July 2011)

Fiscal Year Starting: July 01, 2011
Fiscal Year Ending: June 30, 2012

Total Revenue $6,513,386
Total Expenses $6,282,484

Revenue & Expenses

Revenue and expense information has not been provided by the nonprofit. Click here if you are associated with this organization and want to provide this information.

Chart Illustration Revenue and Expense data from Forms 990 for 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2007 are included in the GuideStar Premium Report. Upgrade Now Report Added To Cart

Back to Top »

Balance Sheet (IRS Form 990)

Chart Illustration Balance Sheet data from Forms 990 for Year 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2007 are included in the GuideStar Premium Report. Upgrade Now Report Added To Cart

Back to Top »
GuideStar Exchange - Silver Participant What is this?
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.

Forms 990 Received from the IRS Additional Information
IRS Form 990 is an annual document used by approximately one-third of all public charities to report information about their finances and operations to the federal government. GuideStar uses data from Form 990 to populate its database with financial information about nonprofit organizations. Posting Form 990 images on the GuideStar website is an ongoing process.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2013, 2012, 2011.

Chart Illustration Forms 990 for 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009 are included in the GuideStar Premium Report. Upgrade Now Report Added To Cart

Forms 990 Provided by the Nonprofit

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2011, 2009.

Financial Statements

Chart Illustration Financial Statements for 2011, 2010, 2009 are included in the GuideStar Premium Report. Upgrade Now Report Added To Cart

Annual Reports

Sign in or create an account to view this information.

GuideStar Exchange - Silver Participant What is this?
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.

Leadership (GuideStar Exchange,
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
June 2012)

Steve Hollingworth

Term:

Since Sept 2011

Profile:

Steve Hollingworth has more than 26 years of extensive experience in international development. He has served as a Program Officer in Lesotho, advanced to be a Deputy Country Director in Bolivia, and then became Country Director in Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and India where he developed microfinance and livelihood programs for very poor people when he worked for CARE, a humanitarian organization fighting global poverty. He also led programs that addressed maternal and child health, reproductive health, HIV/AIDS and gender equity. While in Northern Afghanistan, he led emergency response programs before becoming Chief Operating Officer at CARE's Atlanta headquarters in 2007, where he had direct line-management responsibility for global operations, fundraising and programs in a variety of fields, including micro-enterprise and microfinance, civil society strengthening, local capacity building, local governance and emergency relief and rehabilitation.Steve holds a B.A. in Economics from Augustana College in Rock Island, Illinois, and an M.A. in Economics from the Victoria University of Manchester in Manchester, England.

Board Chair (GuideStar Exchange,
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
June 2012)

Sign in or create an account to view this information from the GuideStar Exchange

Board of Directors (GuideStar Exchange,
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
June 2012)

Sign in or create an account to view this information from the GuideStar Exchange

Officers for Fiscal Year (IRS Form 990)

Chart Illustration Officers for 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2007 are included in the GuideStar Premium Report. Upgrade Now Report Added To Cart

Highest Paid Employees & Their Compensation (IRS Form 990)

Chart Illustration Highest Paid Employee Data for 2007 are included in the GuideStar Premium Report. Upgrade Now Report Added To Cart

People information was last updated by the nonprofit in June 2012

Click here if you are associated with this organization and want to provide updated information.

GuideStar Exchange - Silver Participant What is this?
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.

Programs

Program: Credit with Education (GuideStar Exchange,
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
June 2012)

Budget:
$2,921,233
Category:
Community Development
Population Served:
Female Adults
Female Children and Youth (infants - 19 years)
Male Adults

Program Description:

Women living in rural poverty must overcome numerous hardships to earn money and feed their children. Many live on $1/day or less, have suffered malnutrition their entire lives, and cannot read or write. Yet they do their best with what they have. And what they have in abundance is determination. When a woman joins a Credit with Education program in her village, she links arms with other women she probably knows well. Together, the women receive loans and jointly guarantee repayment. Each woman saves a little money each week. They support and encourage one another to do their best.   At regular meetings, the women's group gathers to make repayments and deposit their savings. The women also participate in a lively and joyful learning session led by a local staff person who speaks their language and knows their culture and customs.   Freedom from Hunger created a curriculum for Credit with Education that directly addresses women's most pressing needs. The learning sessions are dialogue-based, incorporating new information with the knowledge and experience of the group members. The women don't need to read or write to learn. In story, role-play, demonstration, discussion and song, they explore new ideas, share what they know, and help each other find the courage to try new things that improve their lives.

Program Long-Term Success:

Freedom from Hunger launched Credit with Education in 1989 with 50 women in Mali and 50 women in Thailand. In the following years, we designed multiple education topics for health, nutrition, business and money management, using our research on the root causes of hunger and poverty and the effectiveness of various adult learning techniques. Next, we field-tested, redesigned and finalized the education content, methods and materials and then conducted multi-year evaluations to measure impact. In a number of rigorous, scientifically conducted research studies in Bolivia, Ghana, Mali, Peru and Thailand, Freedom from Hunger and independent investigators have documented that women participating in Credit with Education, when compared to similar women not participating, have more income and assets, a greater sense of personal empowerment to make decisions, and better nourished and healthier children. And their whole families have better access to good-quality food throughout the year. Moreover, participating women also manage their businesses better and earn more money (especially during slow seasons) as compared with non-participants.

Program Short-Term Success:

Freedom from Hunger has known for decades that when women come together regularly, many things are possible. The regular meetings women attend to deposit savings and take loans are a platform for learning, encouragement and building self-confidence. The dynamic of solidarity guarantees steady participation, repayment of loans and even the collective courage to try new things. The groups also engage in Freedom from Hunger learning sessions on various topics, such as how to grow savings and how to fight and manage malaria. This education is dialog-based and does not require that women know how to read or write to participate. It fosters a sense of sisterhood among the women so that learning is shared and behavior change is mutually supported by the group members.

Program Success Monitored by:

Client interviews and tracking the numbers of people served through microfinance institutions that Freedom from Hunger partners with around the world.

Program Success Examples:

SOPHIA'S STORY At 32 years old, Sophia has accumulated quite a bit of wisdom to complement the determination that comes naturally to her. She was born and raised in San Martin Porras in the district of Huancavelica, a poor rural community in the mountains of Peru.   Sophia operates four different microenterprises, each helping her meet the needs of her family. She sells school supplies in the fall. On Mother's Day, an important holiday in Peru, Sophia sells gifts. For All Saints Day, she sells costumes, ribbons, and trinkets. At Christmas time, she sells girls' dresses. But at harvest time she returns to the fields. This is the work that Sophia has known for most of her life.   Management of all this work is difficult. "If we're going to a nearby village to sell, we leave at 4 a.m.," Sophia explains. "During the school season, I need to arrive early to get a spot and get my items out to display. I work all day long and return home around 8 or 9 at night. After we close for the night, we buy things until eleven at night to complete the merchandise we'll need for the next day." Her mother takes Sophia's children to school and her 15-year-old daughter helps out as much as she can. On the weekends, Sophia takes her children to the market with her. In spite of her hard work, she cannot always count on success. "Sometimes," she tells me, "there is no business. We just come home with no money."   Sophia supports her entire family on the money she earns. She has two daughters, ages 15 and 4, as well as a son, age 13. She lives with both her parents, who also depend on her. The responsibility can weigh heavily on her. "If their shoes are falling apart, I buy new shoes," she tells me. And she always finds money for school fees.   On this point, Sophia has great pride. "I always send them to school," she says.   With Sophia's first Credit with Education loan of 400 soles ($128), she purchased goods for her school-supply business—her most successful. She joined the program because "The loan officer said it would be easy to get credit and that I do not need collateral," said Sophia. "It's easier this way."   In her credit group, Sophia has learned about preventing childhood illnesses. She talks about the value of this training. "My child got sick in the stomach—it's common because of the water. We tried to cure her with herbs. We cure coughs with herbs. We rubbed her chest, but when she didn't get better, we took her to the hospital. Not long ago, we had to take the youngest to the hospital because she got very sick. Her tonsils were inflamed and she had bronchitis and stomach infection and was dehydrated."   Growing her businesses to earn money for such emergencies is a primary motivation for Sophia. Sophia says her daughter's medicine cost 100 soles ($32). "That day I had to use up all my money because the baby's health comes first. I was then without money," Sophia explains.   With her loans, the chance to save money for emergencies, the training she receives on how to manage her businesses, and the other lifeskills training offered through Credit with Education, Sophia hopes for better times. Living on the margin of survival has taken a toll on everyone in her family. Too often, there was no choice but to look for a handout. "There is a feeding center where they give free lunches," says Sophia as she considers her past. "On bad days, lunch was the only meal we would eat."   But Sophia looks resolutely toward her new future. "I want to have a more stable business with a fixed location. I want a better house. And more than anything else, I want my kids to study. I'd like to give them what they should have and not just what I have."   Sophia's father says he is proud of his daughter's accomplishments and confident that she will achieve her dreams. "She's a support to me," he says. "I can no longer work and she paid for me to have an operation."   Sophia chimes in, "I'm happy to be able to support my parents while they're alive on this earth."   Sophia is one of over 2 million women in 16 of the poorest countries across the globe moving beyond a subsistence life through Credit with Education…women who are empowered because they can feed and educate their children, save for the future, and become self-reliant.

Program: Microfinance and Health Protection (MAHP) (GuideStar Exchange,
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
June 2012)

Budget:
$682,081
Category:
Community Development
Population Served:
Adults

Program Description:

Microfinance is an important contributor to the common goal of ending world poverty. But even the best microfinance programs can be undermined by the illness of borrowers or their family members, causing late repayment or even default. This is especially true for very poor, rural communities, where people are exposed to more health risks and have few options for health care. These same poor, rural communities are the ones Freedom from Hunger is determined to reach and serve with value-added microfinance.   Freedom from Hunger launched the Microfinance and Health Protection (MAHP) initiative in 2006 to help our in-country partners create and sustain key health protection services that complement their microfinance services by safeguarding family health and protecting clients and their families from the shocks of major health expenses.   Made possible in large part by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, MAHP builds on Credit with Education, which combines credit and savings services with education on health and other topics of vital interest to poor communities. Women who participate in Credit with Education programs come together every week or two to borrow money or repay loans and deposit savings. At these same meetings, or in separate community-wide meetings, women engage in learning sessions on topics such as breastfeeding, child health and nutrition, family planning, women's health and also business management and household money management.MAHP complements this education by enabling microfinance institutions to offer financial products and other services that improve access to actual healthcare services and medicines. For example, in Bolivia, a woman may learn about women's health through education at a weekly meeting, and then through the local MAHP program she also has access to regular check-ups to prevent problems or diagnose them early. If treatment is needed, she has access to health loans, health savings, or linkages to health microinsurance to pay for the services.   Five prominent and profitable microfinance institutions-Bandhan in India, CARD in the Philippines, CRECER in Bolivia, PADME in Benin and RCPB (a federation of credit unions) in Burkina Faso-have successfully partnered with Freedom from Hunger's technical advisors, trainers and researchers to develop their own experiments in providing health protection products and services for their poor women clients. Together we have explored and demonstrated the value of a variety of health protection options to address the common needs of microfinance clients and their families.   Freedom from Hunger and its partners are discovering that offering these health protection options not only protects the health and household incomes of poor families (the cost of paying for treatment can be a major setback for very poor families), it also improves their ability to repay loans on time and increases their loyalty to the microfinance institution, enabling it to better sustain and grow its operations. Some of these service innovations generate income for the microfinance institution (e.g., health loans) and others are subsidized as "marketing" costs (e.g., health education and linkages to health providers).   Women participating in MAHP recognize the value of these additional services. As one of the RCPB's clients said, "When you go to the market in the morning, you never know what will happen. But when you have the health savings and can get a health loan, you have the security of knowing that if something does happen, you will be protected." The leaders of our partner microfinance institutions are also convinced of the advantages that health protection brings to clients as well as to their social missions and financial bottom lines. As the initial demonstration of the MAHP innovations draws to a close, the successful MAHP products and services are being extended to thousands of additional clients.

Program Long-Term Success:

Many microfinance institutions (MFIs)—particularly those serving the very poor—have witnessed the effects of all-too-common health shocks on the ability of clients to repay, save and flourish in their microenterprise endeavors.  These institutions seek sustainable approaches that help safeguard their clients’ health while also protecting the institutional bottom line. To meet this demand, Freedom from Hunger launched in January 2006 the Microfinance and Health Protection(http://www.freedomfromhunger.org/programs/mahBolivia (CRECER), Burkina Faso (RCPB), India (Bandhan) and the Philippines (CARD), Freedom from Hunger sought to design and offer health-related products and services with positive health and economic impacts on clients while also being practical, cost-effective and even profitable for the MFIs.  We assisted each MFI to develop its own “package” of health protection options, including health education, health financing and health microinsurance, linkages to healthcare providers and distribution of health products.  After four years, the health protection services and products of the five MFIs were reaching a combined total of more than 300,000 microfinance clients. Freedom from Hunger's technical assistance and training is now helping microfinance institutions in other developing countries around the world to bring this powerful and sustainable combination of health and microfinance to many more women and families in poor communities.

Program Short-Term Success:

Although default rates are low in microfinance, and there are many reasons for client default and dropout, the most cited reason is health—the illness of an MFI client herself or a member of her family. Furthermore, microfinance clients commonly resort to using their MFI business loans to pay healthcare expenses. Integrated microfinance and health services lead to improved health amongst MFI clients and families as well as more access to health care providers and products. This gives them greater financial protection and more choices which also improves their ability to use microfinance loans and to save. Hence, Microfinance institutions also benefit, especially since MAHP services can often be provided at very low costs or even at marginal profits.

Program Success Monitored by:

Qualitative and quantitative data to assess impact of program on client health knowledge, behaviors, financial status, and numbers of total MFI clients reached with health services and products.

Program Success Examples:

Freedom from Hunger and its partners are discovering that offering these health protection options not only protects the health and household incomes of poor families (the cost of paying for treatment can be a major setback for very poor families), it also improves their ability to repay loans on time and increases their loyalty to the microfinance institution, enabling it to better sustain and grow its operations. Some of these service innovations generate income for the microfinance institution (e.g., health loans) and others are subsidized as "marketing" costs (e.g., health education and linkages to health providers).As one of RCPB's clients said, "When you go to the market in the morning, you never know what will happen. But when you have the health savings and can get a health loan, you have the security of knowing that if something does happen, you will be protected."

Program: Saving for Change (GuideStar Exchange,
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
June 2012)

Budget:
$649,984
Category:
International, Foreign Affairs & National Security
Population Served:
Adults
Female Adults

Program Description:

Women who live in very poor, very rural areas face a complex set of obstacles in their fight against poverty. They are much less likely to be literate and much less likely to operate a home-based business that earns more than $1/day. They are no less creditworthy, but their credit needs tend to be small and irregular, so banks cannot afford to provide them with loans. Even microfinance institutions cannot serve them due to the prohibitive costs of transporting staff to their villages.  Further setting them back, many women who endure chronic poverty and hunger are reluctant to participate in microcredit programs. Many lack self-confidence, are unsure whether their home-based businesses can generate enough profit to repay a loan, or simply prefer to save rather than borrow. These women want very much to save money, if only a few pennies at a time, but they rarely have a safe place to keep their savings, much less earn a return on their money.   To overcome these barriers and help these women meet their self-help goals, Freedom from Hunger has co-developed Saving for Change with Oxfam America and Strømme Foundation of Norway, starting in Mali and now spreading to other West African countries and beyond to Latin America. Saving for Change enables groups of women to deposit savings-often starting with weekly deposits of only 20 cents-and build lump sums for predictable needs. When savings accumulate, the women in the group act as their own bankers, approving small loans to each other from their pooled savings. The interest they charge themselves for the loans goes back into the pool of savings, yielding a healthy return on the deposited savings of each member of the grouthe recordkeeping is simple (it is actually done without writing in West Africa), and the women themselves monitor all the transactions. Freedom from Hunger trains and supports local service organizations (NGOs) to train women to start their own groups and manage their own financial needs on an ongoing basis. Over time, the funds grow and allow the members to meet larger and larger financial needs such as healthcare, education, small business start-up and expansion, agriculture and even purchase of food during the hungry season before the next harvest.   Freedom from Hunger has known for decades that when women come together regularly, many things are possible. The regular meetings women attend to deposit savings and take loans are a platform for learning, encouragement and building self-confidence. The dynamic of solidarity guarantees steady participation, repayment of loans and even the collective courage to try new things.   The groups also engage in Freedom from Hunger learning sessions on various topics, such as how to grow savings and how to fight and manage malaria. This education is dialog-based and does not require that women know how to read or write to participate. It fosters a sense of sisterhood among the women so that learning is shared and behavior change is mutually supported by the group members.   An additional benefit of the Saving for Change model in West Africa is that women members of groups, enthusiastic about the changes they are seeing in their own lives, are helping other women to form new Saving for Change groups in the same or nearby villages. Using picture-based curriculum developed by Freedom from Hunger to train group members to expand the program, Saving for Change groups are now being started by women from existing, successful groups. They are launching a true grassroots movement for change.

Program Long-Term Success:

Program Short-Term Success:

Program Success Monitored by:

Program Success Examples:

Program: AIM Youth - Advancing Integratted Microfinance for Youth (GuideStar Exchange,
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
June 2012)

Budget:
$1,932,294
Category:
International, Foreign Affairs & National Security
Population Served:
Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)
Young Adults (20-25 years) -- currently not in use

Program Description:

Youth living in poverty face many challenges as they transition from economic dependence to facing increased household financial responsibility.  Their need to contribute to the household wellbeing is in constant tension with their limited access to financial resources and opportunities. This combination of factors can severely inhibit the ability of youth to break the vicious cycle of trans-generational poverty.  But when youth are equipped with financial knowledge, skills and resources, they expand their options and become better able to make positive changes in their lives that can extend to their future lives and families.   In recognition of the needs of the chronically hungry poor early in their lives, Freedom from Hunger, a recognized expert in integrated financial and nonfinancial services for the chronically hungry, launched the Advancing Integrated Microfinance for Youth (AIM Youth) initiative in December 2009 with funding from The MasterCard Foundation.    In partnership with five microfinance institutions (MFIs) and three non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in Mali and Ecuador, AIM Youth is developing, testing and documenting financial services integrated with youth learner-centered financial education with the objective to enhance the economic wellbeing of youth living in poverty.    Four MFIs and three NGOs are participating in the full implementation of the AIM Youth initiative: MFI : Nyèsigiso (Mali) Kondo Jigima (Mali) Cooperativa de Ahorro y Crédito San José (Ecuador) Cooperativa de Ahorro y Crédito Santa Ana (Ecuador)   NGO: Plan Ecuador (Ecuador) Tonus (Mali) CAEB (Mali)   In addition, Freedom from Hunger will conduct market research studies in Senegal, in partnership with the NGO Tostan, and in Burkina Faso, in partnership with the MFI RCPB, to determine the needs and preferences of youth for financial services, drawing from the experience in Mali.

Program Long-Term Success:

Program Short-Term Success:

Program Success Monitored by:

Program Success Examples:

GuideStar Exchange - Silver Participant What is this?
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.

Impact Summary from the Nonprofit

Rigorous studies have documented that women who participate in Freedom from Hunger's value-added microfinance programs have more money and assets available in the household, a greater sense of personal empowerment to take action in the family and community, better business practices, better health practices, and better nourished, healthier children. Freedom from Hunger has 49 staff working with 150 partners in 19 countries, currently reaching more than 3.9 million people and benefiting a total of over 21 million. Learn more about the studies that confirm our effectiveness, here: http://ffhtechnical.org/.

Expert Assessment

Freedom From Hunger is making an impact in the sector through direct partnerships and support with other microfinance organizations. They work with organizations to develop training for their clients. Freedom From Hunger’s Credit with Education approach to training helps ensure that clients are supported holistically. The organization has worked to support innovation and transparency throughout the sector. Read More »

Expert Reviews and Comments

2012 Philanthropedia Top Nonprofit

This organization is a 2012 Philanthropedia top nonprofit, recommended by experts as having high impact.

These expert reviews were generated through Philanthropedia's research methodology to identify high-impact nonprofits. Learn more

Evidence of Impact

Freedom From Hunger is making an impact in the sector through direct partnerships and support with other microfinance organizations. They work with organizations to develop training for their clients. Freedom From Hunger’s Credit with Education approach to training helps ensure that clients are supported holistically. The organization has worked to support innovation and transparency throughout the sector.

Educational Programming
Their impact is evident in their work on savings, and their strong commitment to using evidence to guide their decision making and planning. Researcher and Faculty
Freedom From Hunger assists microfinance organizations in developing training for clients. In 2011 my organization acquired a module of this training and field tested it thoroughly over a 7 month period. We are most pleased with the results; in particular, with the very positive response we received from our clients on the Freedom From Hunger training. Many microfinance professionals also have the highest regard for their work. Nonprofit Senior Staff
They have an emphasis on providing education with credit. They are highly focused on social impact. Nonprofit Senior Staff
They have a history of publishing papers on their research studies. The organization seems committed to being transparent about what it is working on and what it can improve. They recently collaborated with JPAL on a major evaluation of their program, which showed good success from their savings program. I believe that their education and training materials clearly improve lives. For example, their Credit with Education model supports training on health and on running the business. Their savings circles are also improving lives. Other
Facilitating Advances in the Sector
Freedom From Hunger consistently pushes the field forward to enhance their services and impact. For instance, they have promoted health services through an approach called Credit with Education. Researcher and Faculty
They have brought about advances in learning about financial education and literacy. Nonprofit Senior Staff
Freedom From Hunger has been a major voice in pro-poor, integrated services over many years. Credit with Education and their other models have made significant contributions to the field. Nonprofit Senior Staff
Freedom from Hunger brings a strong evidence-based approach to innovation. It tends to produce evidence and information that is actionable with direct practical application. Nonprofit Senior Staff

Organizational Strengths

One of Freedom From Hunger’s many strengths is their clear commitment to strong research and evaluation. They are also great at identifying strategic opportunities that overlap with their other services. Their work in combining health services with their microfinance training is one great example of this, as is their strong partnerships. The organization’s staff and leadership are making excellent contributions within the organization as well as in the sector.

Information Driven Tactics
They have thoughtful, experienced leadership. They also have a strong management and research team. Nonprofit Senior Staff
They have a strong leadership. They also have a great depth of knowledge around adult informal education, and how to combine health care or information with credit delivery. Nonprofit Senior Staff
They have an exceptionally strong and introspective research and evaluation department. They also conduct academic-quality work. Researcher and Faculty
Excellent Staff
They have steady leadership and a strong research department. Nonprofit Senior Staff
Freedom seems to have weathered the transition from Chris Dunford's long leadership and has brought in a good CEO who seems to be getting off to a good start. They have some good people, such as Kathleen Stack and Lisa Kuhn Fraioli, who seem competent and have made good contributions to global dialogues as well. Nonprofit Senior Staff
The organization has highly committed staff with a strong respect for local institutions. Their training services are strong, and they are highly collaborative. Nonprofit Senior Staff
Innovative Approach
One of their strengths is their excellent use of partnering with in-country microfinance institutions to deliver their program. They backed away from starting their own microfinance institutions after starting one in Uganda and learning how much effort is involved. FFH is also an innovator. Currently they are not only providing health education, but also delivering health services at microfinance meetings, and offering loans for health needs. FFH is also innovating on how to reach out to youth in Mali and Ecuador. Freedom From Hunger has been an innovator in training and education. They understand that training gives borrowers direct benefits and a reason, to come to their weekly repayment meetings. Borrowers know that the content of the training will improve their health, and improve their business operations, through the business training. The Credit with Education health sessions improve the borrowers' health, which indirectly makes their businesses more successful as well. Other

Areas for Improvement

Freedom From Hunger (FFH) should work to secure a stronger funding base and revenue structure, as it has become difficult for many microfinance organizations to get grants. Some experts pointed out that FFH may come against some transitional challenges. For example, it may be difficult to translate pilot programs to various locations, or difficult to reconcile bottom lines. The organization could also benefit from broadening their outreach.

Stabilize Funding
They need to think about how to continue to generate revenue in an environment that is increasingly difficult to raise grants for microfinance. Nonprofit Senior Staff
A stronger funding base is essential for this organization. Nonprofit Senior Staff
Improve Outreach
They could expand their outreach to a wider network. Researcher and Faculty
Freedom from Hunger has a presence in a limited number of geographies. Nonprofit Senior Staff
Transition Challenges
They have been strong over the years in clarifying their mission and bold about changing their business model to make sure they are in sync with their mission. However, it is sometimes tough to straddle the different worlds they straddle. Nonprofit Senior Staff
I believe they struggled for a while to find the right succession plan to long-time CEO Chris Dunford, but I look forward to the leadership of Steve Hollingworth (from CARE). They also were impacted by the 2008 downturn in the economy, which resulted in some layoffs. Working in multiple parts of the world it is always a challenge for any organization to translate one new pilot program to other countries. The youth pilot program is one example. Other
GuideStar Exchange - Silver Participant What is this?
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.

Third Party Ratings, Accreditations and Awards

Reviews

GuideStar Exchange - Silver Participant What is this?
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.

Contractor data is available for this organization!

Independent Contractor information for 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2007 is available for this organization with a subscription to GuideStar Premium Pro.

GuideStar Premium Pro also includes:

  • Comprehensive financial data, including functional expense detail, for every digitized fiscal year in GuideStar's database
  • Ability to download up to 55 fields of data for up to 1,000 organizations at a time and up to five years’ worth of Income Statement and Balance Sheet data for individual organizations
  • Comprehensive advanced search capabilities, including criteria for functional expenses, investible assets, investment income and audit & 990T filing requirements
  • Ability to save organizations and searches for quick reference
  • People search with salary range data
  • Access to all available Forms 990

More information

Upgrade Now!

Organization Data Available

Adobe PDF Format A GuideStar Premium Report in PDF format is available for this organization

Price for this Report: $125.00

This Premium Report includes:

  • Financial Data for
  • Financial Charts for
  • Forms 990 for
  • Forms 990T for
  • Audited Financial Statement for
  • Annual Reports for
  • Letter of Determination
  • Form 1023 / 1024
  • Board Members
  • Officer, Director and/or Highest Paid Employee data for


Learn more about GuideStar Premium