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California Community Foundation Organization Name provided in the GuideStar Exchange* as of 07/31/2014: California Community Foundation

Organization Name as listed in the IRS Business Master File as of 07/14/2014: CALIFORNIA COMMUNITY FOUNDATION

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AKA  CCF
Los Angeles, CA
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GuideStar Summary

&1002;                GuideStar Exchange Committed to transparency ?
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&1002; Registered with IRS Legitimacy information is available
&1002; Financial Data Annual Revenue and Expense data reported
&1002; Forms 990 2012, 2011, and 2010 Forms 990 filed with the IRS
&1002; Mission Objectives Mission Statement is available
&1002; Impact Summary Impact Summary from the nonprofit is available
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Basic Organization Information

California Community Foundation Organization Name provided in the GuideStar Exchange* as of 07/31/2014: California Community Foundation

Organization Name as listed in the IRS Business Master File as of 07/14/2014: CALIFORNIA COMMUNITY FOUNDATION

* The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
Also Known As: CCF
Physical Address: Los Angeles, CA 90012 
EIN: 95-3510055
Web URL: www.calfund.org 
Blog URL: www.givinginla.org 
NTEE Category: T Philanthropy, Voluntarism, and Grantmaking
T31 Community Foundations
S Community Improvement, Capacity Building
S20 Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement
Ruling Year: 1980 


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Mission Statement

Strengthening Los Angeles communities through effective philanthropy and civic engagement.

Legitimacy Information

This organization is registered with the IRS.

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Annual Revenue & Expenses (GuideStar Exchange,
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July 2014)

Fiscal Year Starting: July 1, 2012
Fiscal Year Ending: June 30, 2013

Total Revenue $232,617,162
Total Expenses $179,800,155

Revenue & Expenses (GuideStar Exchange,
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July 2014)

Fiscal Year Starting: July 1, 2012
Fiscal Year Ending: June 30, 2013

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Balance Sheet (IRS Form 990)

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Forms 990 Received from the IRS Additional Information
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Forms 990 Provided by the Nonprofit

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Leadership (GuideStar Exchange,
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July 2014)

Ms. Antonia Hernández

Profile:

Nationally recognized for her commitment toward the betterment of underserved communities in Los Angeles and beyond, Antonia Hernández joined the community foundation as president in February 2004. Previously, she was president and general counsel of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF), a national non-profit litigation and advocacy organization dedicated to protecting the civil rights of the nation's 35 million Latinos. She is currently a trustee of the Rockefeller Foundation, sits on the boards of the Automobile Club of Southern California and Golden West Financial Corporation. She earned her B.A. in History at UCLA in 1970 and J.D. at the UCLA School of Law in 1974.

Leadership Statement:

Foundations and nonprofit organizations improve and strengthen communities, frequently filling a critical vacuum that government cannot adequately address.  At the same time, many field experts have called on foundations to become more relevant in their communities, be more urgent in addressing urgent public needs, be more effective in their grantmaking and think more long-term. CCF has flourished for 99 years because we are proactively pursuing windows of opportunity and change to relieve some of the pain being experienced by the most vulnerable populations in L.A. County.  Every generation encounters great challenges and opportunities.  This is our time, and how we respond today will have repercussions tomorrow. Los Angeles is our place, and how we care for it now will determine the kind of a place it will be to live, work and play for future generations. View CCF’s best practices as a model grantmaker(http://www.calfund.org/pub_documents/Bestpractices.pdf) .

Board Chair (GuideStar Exchange,
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July 2014)

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Board Co-Chair

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Board of Directors (GuideStar Exchange,
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July 2014)

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Board Leadership Practices (GuideStar Exchange,
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July 2014)
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Board Orientation & Education ?
Why does this matter? Without clarity around their responsibilities and expectations, board members are not positioned to succeed. They may find themselves challenged to fulfill their governance responsibilities or frustrated by the expectations that the organization has set for them. BoardSource recommends that every new board member participate in a formal orientation process, and that all board members sign a pledge or agreement committing to their board service and to all of the responsibilities and expectations that come with service. Ideally, board members also should participate in a formal governance training program prior to serving on a board.

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?
Response Not Provided
CEO Oversight ?
Why does this matter? Oversight and management of the chief executive is one of the board’s most important legal responsibilities. The CEO or executive director is the board's single employee, and - just like any other employer/employee relationship - regular and written assessment is critical to ensuring that the chief executive and board are communicating openly about goals and performance. BoardSource recommends that boards conduct formal, written reviews of their chief executives on an annual basis, which should include an in-person discussion with the chief executive and distribution of the written evaluation to the full board.

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?
Response Not Provided
Ethics & Transparency ?
Why does this matter? A commitment to handling conflicts of interests is essential to creating an organizational culture of transparency. Boards should create and follow a policy for identifying and handling conflicts of interest, whether real or perceived. BoardSource recommends that organizations review the conflict-of-interest statement and require signed disclosures from all board members and senior staff on an annual basis.

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements within the past year?
Response Not Provided
Board Composition ?
Why does this matter? The best boards are composed of individuals who bring a variety of skills, perspectives, backgrounds, and resources to tackle the complex and strategic challenges confronting their organizations. BoardSource recommends that boards commit to diversity and inclusion by establishing written policies and practices, which include strategic and intentional recruitment of diverse board members, continual commitment to inclusivity, and equal access to board leadership opportunities.

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?
Response Not Provided
Board Performance ?
Why does this matter? Boards need to regularly assess their own performance. Doing so ensures that they are being intentional about how they govern their organization, which is a critical component of effective board leadership. BoardSource recommends that a board conduct a self-assessment of its performance a minimum of once every three years to ensure that it is staying on track with its roles and responsibilities.

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?
Response Not Provided

Officers for Fiscal Year (IRS Form 990)

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People information was last updated by the nonprofit in July 2014

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Programs

Program: Arts (GuideStar Exchange,
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July 2014)

Budget:
$1,933,888
Category:
Arts, Culture & Humanities
Population Served:
Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

Program Description:

Focus: Increasing participation in the arts among underserved communities and supporting individual artists. We support small and midsize, community-based arts organizations so that they can in turn provide local, affordable and accessible arts opportunities for community members to participate, create and engage in art that is relevant to their lives.

Program Long-Term Success:

Since 2006, both the number of CCF-funded arts organizations and people served annually have increased — from seven to 32 organizations and 208,408 to 555,569 served. The increase in funding is due to the availability of resources from the Palevsky Endowment for the Future of Los Angeles(http://www.calfund.org/give/jplegacy.php) and a grant from the James Irvine Foundation. In its 21st year, the Fellowships for Visual Artists(http://www.calfund.org/receive/fellowships.php) program has supported 144 artists.

Program Short-Term Success:

Since 2006, both the number of CCF-funded arts organizations and people served annually have increased — from seven to 32 organizations and 208,408 to 555,569 served. The increase in funding is due to the availability of resources from the Palevsky Endowment for the Future of Los Angeles(http://www.calfund.org/give/jplegacy.php) and a grant from the James Irvine Foundation. In its 21st year, the Fellowships for Visual Artists(http://www.calfund.org/receive/fellowships.php) program has supported 144 artists.

Program Success Monitored by:

Leslie Ito(http://www.calfund.org/learn/staffbios.php#Leslie_Ito) , arts program officer

Program Success Examples:

Top-performing grantees include: Cornerstone Theater Company(http://www.calfund.org/learn/unsung_heroes_honorees.php) , a mid-size, multi-ethnic, ensemble-based company brings together people who would not normally interact to produce a play. Recently, the theater group explored how laws shape and disrupt communities and focused on such issues as illegal immigration, incarceration and reproductive rights. East West Players(http://www.calfund.org/learn/unsung_heroes_honorees.php) , a professional theater group for underserved Asian Pacific American communities, draws 35,000 attendees each year through its four educational programs and its main stage season. Social and Public Arts Resource Center (SPARC)(http://www.calfund.org/learn/unsung_heroes_honorees.php) promotes public art as an organizing tool for addressing contemporary issues, fostering cross-cultural understanding and promoting civic dialogue. It is working with the city of Los Angeles to address the issue of murals across L.A. that are deteriorating due to increased graffiti.

Program: Education (GuideStar Exchange,
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July 2014)

Budget:
$2,600,000
Category:
Education
Population Served:
Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)
Children Only (5 - 14 years)

Program Description:

Focus: Ensuring children from low-income families are prepared for kindergarten; improving K–5 student performance in math and literacy; and reducing the gaps in achievement among underserved populations. We support programs that offer quality early childhood education, family literacy or parent education, increase parent engagement and provide quality teacher professional development.

Program Long-Term Success:

Superintendent Ramon Cortines incorporated the LAUSD report card(http://www.calfund.org/learn/CCFNewsforCommunityFeb2009_lausd.php) as a tool promoting accountability in reform efforts. 36 active grantees served 26,211 children, engaged 24,313 parents and trained 1,027 teachers. Geographic distribution of grants(http://www.calfund.org/octnews_grantmaking.php) has expanded to all areas of L.A. County during the last three years.

Program Short-Term Success:

Distributed 21 grants for $2.6 million, an increase of $200,000 over the previous year. CCF’s grantees provided 5,532 parents with trainings and workshops on how to support their children’s learning and academic achievement.

Program Success Monitored by:

Peter Rivera(mailto:privera@ccf-la.org) , education program officer

Program Success Examples:

Top-performing grantees include: Mothers’ Club Family Learning Center(http://www.calfund.org/learn/unsung_heroes_honorees.php) helps at-risk children and their parents get a better education.Each year, the center serves about 100 children and their families, who are low-income, primarily immigrant and English learners living in northwest Pasadena. Mar Vista Family Center(http://www.calfund.org/learn/unsung_heroes_honorees.php) is a full service family center that emphasizes parents as partners in their children’s education. The center serves nearly 1,000 children, youth and adults annually, including 17 children who graduate from preschool ready to succeed in elementary school. Mar Vista’s parents have also formed an advocacy group made up of 22 parents and have taken part in events advocating for early childhood education. Long Beach Day Nursery(http://www.calfund.org/learn/unsung_heroes_honorees.php) is one of the oldest nonprofit child development agencies in California. Every year, the center serves nearly 250 children from ages six weeks to six years, offering child care, nutritional meals, kindergarten readiness classes and parent education.

Program: Health Care (GuideStar Exchange,
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July 2014)

Budget:
$3,754,840
Category:
Health Care
Population Served:
Ethnic/Racial Minorities -- General

Program Description:

Focus: Improving access to a regular, sustainable source of quality health care for low-income adults and children. We support community clinics, a critical segment of the health care safety net for the medically underserved and uninsured. We promote policy and advocacy efforts aimed at strengthening the outpatient safety net, and support efforts to expand health care coverage for uninsured children.

Program Long-Term Success:

Seventeen community clinics provided approximately 976,324 patient visits to more than 290,000 low-income children and adults.  Collectively, during the past three years, CCF-funded clinics have provided more than a million patient visits to an average of more than 275,000 patients annually since 2006.

Program Short-Term Success:

Distributed 18 grants for $3.3 million. More than half of the organizations funded were community clinics serving the San Fernando Valley, San Gabriel Valley, East L.A., Metro L.A., South Bay and South L.A.(http://www.calfund.org/octnews_grantmaking.php)

Program Success Monitored by:

Tamu Jones(http://www.calfund.org/learn/staffbios.php#TJones) , health care program officer

Program Success Examples:

Top-performing grantees include: St. John’s Well Child and Family Center(http://www.calfund.org/learn/unsung_heroes_honorees.php) provides low and no-cost comprehensive services to children, adolescents and adults. It operates 11 clinics sites serving downtown, Northeast and South Los Angeles. Each year, St. John’s provides 75,000 patient visits to more than 25,000 clients who are 85 percent Latino, 14 percent African American and 1 percent Asian/Pacific Islander. More than 90 percent of its patients have incomes below the federal poverty level. Community Health Alliance of Pasadena (CHAP)(http://www.calfund.org/learn/unsung_heroes_honorees.php) offers affordable health care to people in need. Each year, it provides 25,000 patient visits to more than 8,000 clients primarily to residents in northwest Pasadena and surrounding communities. In 2006, CCF funded CHAP to pilot a chronic disease self-management program for low-income adults with severe diabetes. More than 88 patients completed the program and more than 75 percent of severe diabetics saw their blood glucose levels droCHAP established a permanent health education department. University Muslim Medical Association (UMMA)(http://www.calfund.org/learn/unsung_heroes_honorees.php) , which gained support from the City of Los Angeles to set up a primary care clinic in South L.A., provides about 6,600 patient visits to 2,400 low-income and uninsured patients each year.

Program: Housing and Economic Development (GuideStar Exchange,
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July 2014)

Budget:
--
Category:
Affordable Housing
Population Served:
General Public/Unspecified
None
None

Program Description:

The California Community Foundation is one of the largest supporters of affordable housing in Los Angeles. We believe that stable, livable housing and neighborhoods lead to thriving communities. To pursue this vision as sources of funding are reduced, we use a multi-faceted approach to addess the growing need for affordable housing development and preservation. Through our Housing and Economic Development Program, we utilize foundation-directed grantmaking to advance the affordable housing agenda to increase the supply of housing available for low-income families and individuals. This allows us to: 1. Support nonprofit organizations that produce and preserve affordable housing for low income people, including special needs populations; 2. Expand access to capital and build capacity; 3. Support advocacy to provide more resources for housing; and 4. Build grassroots efforts to preserve low-income neighborhoods, protect low-income residents, and promote the inclusion of affordable homes around transit. Our grantees and partners want to ensure affordable housing is preserved and more is built, that small businesses are protected, new job opportunities are shared with local residents, that the actual transit stops encourage high ridership and are safe, and that the transit system connects low income people to jobs, education and health resources. This will produce a greater impact in our housing and economic development work and will increase resources and political will for affordable housing for Los Angeles County and Southern California.

Program Long-Term Success:

CCF grantees in L.A. County produced 749 housing units and a total of 1,960 units over the last three fiscal years. Added two new legal services grantees that serve those affected by the foreclosure crisis. Those grants extended foreclosure-related eviction legal services to an additional 2,200 low-income households.

Program Short-Term Success:

Distributed 22 grants for $2.3 million, including 13 organizations receiving $1.45 million for core operating support; eight receiving $758,000 for policy/advocacy support; and one receiving $100,000 for capacity building.

Program Success Monitored by:

Yamileth Guevara(http://www.calfund.org/learn/staffbios.php#yguevara) , neighborhood revitalization program officer

Program Success Examples:

Top-performing grantees include: A Community of Friends (ACOF)(http://www.calfund.org/learn/unsung_heroes_honorees.php) develops permanent supportive housing for homeless people and families with special needs and works with community-based service agencies to offer on-site support services to promote stability. Over the last 20 years, ACOF has completed 34 projects for more than 1,270 people and families. The agency has an exceptional retention rate among its tenants: 74 percent of tenants maintain their housing for at least 12 months with another 50 percent housed for more than five years. Abode Communities(http://www.calfund.org/learn/unsung_heroes_honorees.php) develops affordable housing for low-income and special needs people and to improve neighborhoods throughout Los Angeles County. Since it was founded in 1968, Abode has invested nearly $300 million in real estate development and completed more than 50 affordable housing projects totaling nearly 3,000 units. Little Tokyo Service Center (LTSC)(http://www.calfund.org/learn/unsung_heroes_honorees.php) is a comprehensive social service and community economic development agency that serves about 6,000 people annually. It also develops and preserves affordable housing for low-income families in Los Angeles County. During the last 16 years, the agency has developed more than 600 units of affordable rental housing.

Program: Transition Aged Youth (GuideStar Exchange,
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July 2014)

Budget:
--
Category:
Foster Care
Population Served:
Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)
None
None

Program Description:

The California Community Foundation has devoted considerable thought and deliberation to how it can better address the needs of vulnerable populations in L.A. County with significant but limited resources. As a result, effective October 2012, CCF modified its human development grantmaking to concentrate more on youth transitioning from foster care and/or the delinquency system. CCF feels strongly that access to, and consistent use, of community-based services significantly helps transition aged youth (or “TAY”) meet their basic needs and help pave the way for them to thrive in the future. Through its TAY grantmaking, CCF seeks to ensure that youth aged out of either the child welfare (i.e., foster care) or delinquency (i.e., probation) systems in L.A. County get the support they need to meet their basic needs and propel them to reach their full potential. Basic needs of focus are housing and income. We pursue this goal by prioritizing key strategies capable of producing the outcomes identified below: 1. Effective community-based supports that help transition aged youth meet and sustain their basic needs such as housing, income and transportation. Examples of such services are: transitional/permanent housing, vocational training programs or financial literacy programs. 2. Build constituencies that effectively educate the public and advocate to ensure public funding streams are appropriated and policies are implemented in a fair and equitable manner. 3. Increase overall effectiveness by strengthening organizational competencies and skills sets (e.g., improve outcome tracking systems, leverage diversified funding streams, etc.).

Program Long-Term Success:

Program Short-Term Success:

Program Success Monitored by:

Program Success Examples:

Program: Immigrant Integration (GuideStar Exchange,
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July 2014)

Budget:
--
Category:
Immigrants, Newcomers, Refuges
Population Served:
Immigrants/Newcomers/Refugees
None
None

Program Description:

The Immigrant Integration Initiative seeks to increase the civic participation of immigrants in L.A. County, enhance the region’s policies and systems, and foster vibrant, engaged communities. CCF believes that what is required is fundamental systems change, and that promoting community leadership and policy changes will ultimately lead to lasting improvements. To achieve this, CCF focuses on the following strategies: *Increasing the problem-solving capacity of communities through leadership development and capacity building of residents and organizations; *Increasing the civic participation and involvement of immigrants to pursue public policy solutions that address local and regional issues; and *Strengthening alliances/partnerships to work together to prioritize and address the needs of immigrants Examples of desired outcomes include the following: *Grassroots community members have increased leadership skills and capacity *Grassroots community members are involved in policy advocacy, including leadership roles *Civic engagement and advocacy efforts lead to positive changes in systems affecting the quality of life in immigrant communities *Communications, research or policy analysis support successful advocacy and increase public awareness about issues affecting immigrant communities

Program Long-Term Success:

Council on Immigrant Integration: A 35-member panel of Los Angeles leaders from business, labor, education, law enforcement, government agencies and community-based organizations meets on an ongoing basis. Convened by CCF, this group has identified priorities and is providing local and regional leadership on immigrant integration. To view the Council on Immigrant Integration policy principles, please click here. Grants to Community-Based Organizations: Since the start of the Initiative, more than $2.9 million in grants has been awarded to local nonprofits to increase civic participation in immigrant communities, develop leadership skills among immigrant residents and support public policy advocacy. For a list of grantees and projects, see “Partners” tab. Research to Inform the Field: Research studies commisioned by CCF are helping to set the context and framework for policy advocacy and funding strategies for foundations and other organizations. Strategic Communications By spurring an exchange of information and ideas, CCF is supporting organizations in shifting public discourse, creating a new narrative on the immigrant experience and providing a balanced view of immigrant contributions to the regional economy and society.

Program Short-Term Success:

Program Success Monitored by:

Program Success Examples:

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Impact Summary from the Nonprofit

California Community Foundation (CCF) is a public, charitable organization dedicated to strengthening communities of Los Angeles County through effective philanthropy and civic engagement. We are a family of more than 1,700 charitable funds and foundations created by people and institutions that have entrusted us with their charitable investments and legacy.  We assist individuals, families, companies and organizations through a variety of financial products and services, expertise in accepting a range of complex assets; flexible options for local and global giving; and personalized education and grantmaking assistance. We make donor advised grants to a wide range of worthy causes, locally and around the world. We also award competitive grants to qualified nonprofits in L.A. focused on long-term change in seven key areas: arts, civic engagement, education, health care, housing and economic development, immigrant integration and transition-aged youth. In addition, we manage scholarships and restricted funds as well as engaging in community problem-solving and special initiatives such as natural disaster relief, as needs arise. In fiscal year ended June 30, 2013, we received $172 million in new gifts and distributed $164 million in grants.    View our impact in 2013 (http://2013annualreport.calfund.org/) .
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