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UNITED STATES VETERANS INITIATIVE (U.S.VETS) Organization Name provided in the GuideStar Exchange* as of 01/21/2015: UNITED STATES VETERANS INITIATIVE (U.S.VETS)

Organization Name as listed in the IRS Business Master File as of 12/08/2014: UNITED STATES VETERANS INITIATIVE

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AKA  U.S.VETS
Los Angeles, CA
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GuideStar Summary

&1002; GuideStar Exchange Committed to transparency ?
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&1002; Registered with IRS Legitimacy information is available
&1002; Financial Data Annual Revenue and Expense data reported
&1002; Forms 990 2013, 2012, and 2012 Forms 990 filed with the IRS
&1002; Mission Objectives Mission Statement is available
&1002; Impact Summary Impact Summary from the nonprofit is available
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Basic Organization Information

UNITED STATES VETERANS INITIATIVE (U.S.VETS) Organization Name provided in the GuideStar Exchange* as of 01/21/2015: UNITED STATES VETERANS INITIATIVE (U.S.VETS)

Organization Name as listed in the IRS Business Master File as of 12/08/2014: UNITED STATES VETERANS INITIATIVE

* The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.
Also Known As: U.S.VETS
Physical Address: Los Angeles, CA 90017 
EIN: 95-4382752
Web URL: www.usvetsinc.org 
NTEE Category: W Public, Society Benefit
W30 Military/Veterans' Organizations
P Human Services
P85 Homeless Services/Centers
J Employment, Job Related
J20 Employment Procurement Assistance and Job Training
Ruling Year: 1992 
Top Funders: Dept. of Veteran Affairs (VA) - $16,658,492
Dept. of Housing & Urban Development (HUD) - $6,738,714
Dept. of Labor (DOL) - $1,476,305
Top Funding Needs: Private support to help 3,000+ homeless veterans/families per year become self-sufficient - $3,848,328
Mental health services for post 9/11 veterans - $500,000
Employment services for unemployed and under-employed veterans - $500,000


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Mission Statement

U.S.VETS mission is the successful transition of military veterans and their families through the provision of housing, counseling, career development, and comprehensive support. U.S.VETS is the largest veteran-specific non-profit housing and service provider in the country with 11 sites in six states (AZ, CA, HI, MO, NV, and TX) and the District of Columbia. Since its inception in 1993, U.S.VETS has engaged over 118,000 veterans, provided residential services to nearly 45,000 veterans and placed 12,000 veterans into jobs. Core services include transitional and permanent housing in coordination with specialized support services and employment assistance to help homeless and at-risk veterans achieve self-sufficiency. To meet the needs of an ever changing veteran population, U.S.VETS offers services specifically targeted to Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF) veterans; female veterans with children; female victims of military sexual trauma; and non-custodial fathers. U.S.VETS homelessness prevention programs include: 1) the Career Development Initiative (CDI), recipient of the Call of Duty Endowment’s Seal of Distinction, recognizing CDI as one of the “most effective and efficient programs in the country placing veterans into high quality careers”; 2) Outside the Wire, providing preventative and early mental health counseling to student veterans attending community colleges in Southern California; and 3) Supportive Services for Veteran Families, providing temporary assistance to at-risk, low-income veteran families in an effort to keep them from becoming homeless. U.S.VETS has also been selected as the lead nonprofit agency to provide services to the more than 400,000 U.S. military veterans, dependents, and survivors residing in Los Angeles County at a one-stop service center for veterans at Patriotic Hall in downtown Los Angeles.

Legitimacy Information

This organization is registered with the IRS.

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Annual Revenue & Expenses

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Fiscal Year Starting: July 1, 2013
Fiscal Year Ending: June 30, 2014

Total Revenue $37,167,205
Total Expenses $36,552,943

Revenue & Expenses

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Fiscal Year Starting: July 1, 2013
Fiscal Year Ending: June 30, 2014

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Balance Sheet (IRS Form 990)

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Forms 990 Received from the IRS Additional Information
IRS Form 990 is an annual document used by approximately one-third of all public charities to report information about their finances and operations to the federal government. GuideStar uses data from Form 990 to populate its database with financial information about nonprofit organizations. Posting Form 990 images on the GuideStar website is an ongoing process.

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Forms 990 Provided by the Nonprofit

Financial Statements

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Annual Reports

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Leadership

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Mr. Stephen J Peck

Profile:

Stephen Peck embraced the Marine Corps vow to never leave anyone behind. It is that loyalty to those who have served their country that drives Peck as the president and CEO of the U.S.VETS. After his service in Vietnam, Peck began his career as a filmmaker, and made documentaries focusing on veterans and the homeless. He has been working on behalf of homeless and troubled veterans for nearly 20 years. He was appointed president of U.S.VETS in August 2010 following the sudden death of Dwight Radcliff. Peck was the founding director of U.S.VETS largest program: Villages at Cabrillo in Long Beach, the largest social services program for homeless veterans in the country. Peck began his full-time commitment to veterans in 1991 when he founded the non-profit, Far From Home Foundation to advocate for homeless veterans issues and raise funds for fledgling rehabilitation programs. In 1993 he began working full time at the Comprehensive Homeless Program at the West L.A. VA Medical Center. His nearly four years as an outreach worker and program coordinator gave him an intimate knowledge of the needs and hopes of homeless veterans. Simultaneously, he returned to graduate school and earned a Master’s Degree in Social Work at USC. In 1996 he accepted an offer to become Director of Community Development for U.S. VETS. Steve Peck continues to advocate on a state and national level to bring attention to possible solutions for the homeless, using as a model the programs U.S.VETS has developed. He is a frequent participant on national panels and has been honored by the National Coalition for Homeless Veterans, the USC School of Social Work, the American Legion Auxiliary, and the City of Long Beach.

Leadership Statement:

Our job as I see it, is to engage the enemy at home in the U.S. – the enemy of homelessness, disillusionment, and disappointment – to let these men and women know that there is a path forward and that we support them and are tremendously grateful for their contribution to this country and the sacrifices they have made. Stephen J. Peck

Board Chair (GuideStar Exchange,
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January 2015)

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Board Co-Chair

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Board of Directors (GuideStar Exchange,
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January 2015)

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Board Leadership Practices (GuideStar Exchange,
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January 2015)
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GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

Board Orientation & Education ?
Why does this matter? Without clarity around their responsibilities and expectations, board members are not positioned to succeed. They may find themselves challenged to fulfill their governance responsibilities or frustrated by the expectations that the organization has set for them. BoardSource recommends that every new board member participate in a formal orientation process, and that all board members sign a pledge or agreement committing to their board service and to all of the responsibilities and expectations that come with service. Ideally, board members also should participate in a formal governance training program prior to serving on a board.

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?
Yes
CEO Oversight ?
Why does this matter? Oversight and management of the chief executive is one of the board’s most important legal responsibilities. The CEO or executive director is the board's single employee, and - just like any other employer/employee relationship - regular and written assessment is critical to ensuring that the chief executive and board are communicating openly about goals and performance. BoardSource recommends that boards conduct formal, written reviews of their chief executives on an annual basis, which should include an in-person discussion with the chief executive and distribution of the written evaluation to the full board.

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?
Yes
Ethics & Transparency ?
Why does this matter? A commitment to handling conflicts of interests is essential to creating an organizational culture of transparency. Boards should create and follow a policy for identifying and handling conflicts of interest, whether real or perceived. BoardSource recommends that organizations review the conflict-of-interest statement and require signed disclosures from all board members and senior staff on an annual basis.

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements within the past year?
Yes
Board Composition ?
Why does this matter? The best boards are composed of individuals who bring a variety of skills, perspectives, backgrounds, and resources to tackle the complex and strategic challenges confronting their organizations. BoardSource recommends that boards commit to diversity and inclusion by establishing written policies and practices, which include strategic and intentional recruitment of diverse board members, continual commitment to inclusivity, and equal access to board leadership opportunities.

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?
Yes
Board Performance ?
Why does this matter? Boards need to regularly assess their own performance. Doing so ensures that they are being intentional about how they govern their organization, which is a critical component of effective board leadership. BoardSource recommends that a board conduct a self-assessment of its performance a minimum of once every three years to ensure that it is staying on track with its roles and responsibilities.

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?
Yes

Organizational Demographics (GuideStar Exchange,
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Values in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

Diversity Policy

Does the organization track retention of staff, board, and volunteers? Yes
Does the organization track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board?  Yes

Officers for Fiscal Year (IRS Form 990)

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Highest Paid Employees & Their Compensation (IRS Form 990)

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People information was last updated by the nonprofit in January 2015

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Programs

Program: ADVANCE & Women with Children (GuideStar Exchange,
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January 2015)

Budget:
$907,615
Category:
Military & Veterans
Population Served:
Homeless
Crime/Abuse Victims
Female Adults

Program Description:

Established in 2001 in California and recently expanded to Hawaii, ADVANCE is the first program of its kind addressing sexual trauma in homeless female veterans. Program components cover a full spectrum of female veterans’ needs, and include: Trauma Track; Work Re-entry Track; Life Plan Track (for the disabled); Substance Abuse Treatment Track and the Women with Children Track. Veterans’ children have access to a school, playground and weekend activities.

Program Long-Term Success:

Over 700 women and children assisted since program inception.

Program Short-Term Success:

-- Increase in housing stability for homeless female veterans: 75% of clients placed in permanent housing maintained housing seven months after housing placement. -- Increased access to mainstream benefits and healthcare systems: 100% of clients who enter the program are enrolled in VA or community healthcare and receive mental and physical healthcare services; 60% obtain increased income from mainstream health and human service programs. --- Increased economic stability through employment income, training opportunity and financial literacy: 100% of program participants are enrolled in employment and/or life skills training; 75% obtain employment or continue life skills training in a 12-month period; 90% complete financial management and financial literacy training and maintain a savings plan -- Increased mental health and physical wellness: 90% of participants with a trauma related diagnosis attend trauma-related support groups supplemented by individual therapy as needed; 90% of participants maintain sobriety from program entry to exit and report enhanced feelings of self-determination and community integration and involvement.

Program Success Monitored by:

U.S. VETS’ approach is outcomes driven. Successful program performance is determined by data that indicates steps towards self-sufficiency: remaining stable in housing, obtaining employment or increased income, maintaining sobriety. This is assessed through monthly performance and fiscal reporting that is overseen by the Site Directors, the Vice President of Programs, and the Vice President of Operations & Compliance. Outcomes are regularly reported to the Board of Directors and funders. To ensure the efficacy and efficiency of the programs, executive and program staff meets regularly to assess the monthly data reports, share anecdotal evidence, review best practices, and reevaluate core competencies to make program adjustments as necessary.

Program Success Examples:

While serving in the Navy, Elizabeth K. was a victim of sexual assault. After her return to civilian life she struggled to cope with the traumatic experience and sought support from the U.S.VETS ADVANCE Women Program. After completing the sexual trauma treatment program, she began vocational rehabilitation and is working hard to rebuild her life. In the program, Elizabeth “learned not to let anyone disrespect me… to be mindful, and to rely on my true essence instead of outside influences.”

Program: Career Development Initiative (CDI) (GuideStar Exchange,
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January 2015)

Budget:
$661,482
Category:
Job Training & Employment
Population Served:
Military/Veterans
Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General
Adults

Program Description:

Launched in 2011 at U.S.VETS headquarters in Los Angeles with support from JPMorgan Chase and the Carl & Roberta Deutsch Foundation, U.S.VETS Career Development Initiative (CDI) provides career placement assistance with a focus on Iraq and Afghanistan veterans. In November 2013, the program earned the Call of Duty Endowment’s Seal of Distinction, recognizing CDI as one of the “most effective and efficient programs in the country placing veterans into high quality careers.” In March 2014, CDI received the National Guard’s Above and Beyond award in recognition of the program’s successful track record of placing National Guard members into long-term employment. CDI increases employment opportunities and income for unemployed and under-employed military veterans through targeted business development across industry sectors, effective collaboration with other nonprofit providers, long-term post employment follow up and building linkages between employers, veterans and training/certification assistance. Last year, CDI Los Angeles placed over 160 veterans with an average wage at placement of $55,000. Approximately 60%of placements were in STEM fields (Science, Technology, Math and Engineering). In June 2014, CDI expanded to U.S.VETS sites in Houston, TX; Washington, D.C.; Phoenix, AZ and Barbers Point, HI with a goal of placing 400 veterans per year.

Program Long-Term Success:

Average wage at placement of $55,000. Approximately 60%of placements n STEM fields (Science, Technology, Math and Engineering). Earned the Call of Duty Endowment Seal of Distinction recognizing CDI as "one of the most cost effective programs in the country placing veterans back to work." CDI was selected from a range of national applicants and vetted by Deloitte’s professional auditing service to ascertain their integrity and financial viability for meeting veteran employment objectives.

Program Short-Term Success:

Over 400 veterans placed into employment per year.

Program Success Monitored by:

Metrics reported on a quarterly basis to senior leadership, the Board of Directors and funders.

Program Success Examples:

“As a veteran of the U.S. Army and father of three, I understand what it means to work hard. But as so many people do, I found myself out of work. When I came to U.S.VETS for help finding a job, I had been unemployed for several years. Finding employers who would take someone that didn’t have recent work experience, let alone any relevant work experience, was a difficult obstacle to overcome. U.S.VETS’ Career Development Initiative helped me rewrite my cover letter and resume to focus on my skills, identify job opportunities and get interviews. Before and after each interview, I received coaching on what to expect, especially since each interviewer would want to know about my long stretch of unemployment. This helped boost my confidence to impress potential employers – CDI even got me a new suit to wear to interviews. Through CDI I was able to get a job in contract administration from a national company, at a higher wage than I had hoped for. U.S.VETS not only gave me the employment assistance I needed, but also gave me the moral support and confidence to get me through the difficulty of unemployment. The people at U.S.VETS have the compassion and knowledge to help veterans. Without U.S.VETS and CDI, I may not have been given this incredible life-altering opportunity.”

Program: Veterans in Progress (VIP) (GuideStar Exchange,
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January 2015)

Budget:
$11,258,719
Category:
Military & Veterans
Population Served:
Military/Veterans
Homeless
Disabled, General or Disability Unspecified

Program Description:

The program goal is to help veterans maintain residential stability, achieve greater self-determination, and increase skills and/or income. The program provides support services including case management, life skills classes, legal and residential assistance, and sobriety support groups for veterans with addiction issues.

Program Long-Term Success:

75% of veteran participants remain stable in their residence or transition to stable housing. 100% of veterans with sobriety support issues or at high-risk for addiction attend sobriety support groups and/or life skills classes; 85% maintain sobriety; 60% of veterans obtain employment or increase income through benefits.

Program Short-Term Success:

Homeless veterans achieve residential stability and greater self-determination.

Program Success Monitored by:

U.S. VETS’ approach is outcomes driven. Successful program performance is determined by data that indicates steps towards self-sufficiency: remaining stable in housing, obtaining employment or increased income, maintaining sobriety. This is assessed through monthly performance and fiscal reporting that is overseen by the Site Directors, the Vice President of Programs, and the Vice President of Operations & Compliance. Outcomes are regularly reported to the Board of Directors and funders. To ensure the efficacy and efficiency of the programs, executive and program staff meets regularly to assess the monthly data reports, share anecdotal evidence, review best practices, and reevaluate core competencies to make program adjustments as necessary.

Program Success Examples:

David V., who served in the U.S. Air Force during the Vietnam War, came to U.S.VETS - California after a lengthy struggle with homelessness and alcoholism. After completing the Veterans in Progress (VIP) Program in Los Angeles, he transferred to the U.S.VETS program in Prescott, AZ. He currently works as an Avionics Technician and is continuing his education. The message he would like to share with other veterans who are struggling: “Change your attitude about yourself. In order to change myself, I had to change my outlook on life. I went from recreating (self-seeking) my life to re-creating (change) my life. We must stop thinking that a situation is hopeless. That's only our perception. People can help if you will let them. Get help. Get support.”

Program: Outside the Wire - Mental Health (GuideStar Exchange,
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January 2015)

Budget:
$425,785
Category:
Outpatient Mental Health Treatment
Population Served:
Military/Veterans
Female Adults
Male Adults

Program Description:

Outside the Wire is a preventative mental health program providing targeted outreach and mental health counseling to returning veterans attending S. California community colleges. U.S.VETS’ Outside the Wire works collaboratively with the USC School of Social Work, Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Long Beach Community College, Santa Monica Community College, Pasadena City College, Los Angeles City College, West Los Angeles City College, El Camino City College, Cerritos Community College, Cypress Community College, and L.A. Technical School and is expanding programs in Orange County, CA. The program addresses post 9/11 veterans’ unmet need for preventative and/or early mental health treatment due to service-related psychological injuries, i.e.; post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depression, as a result of experiences in war. All services are provided to veterans and family members at no cost. Outside the Wire also provides training in combat related mental health issues and military cultural sensitivity to psychology doctoral candidates and MSW interns, broadening the network of providers with expertise to help the Los Angeles community’s armed forces personnel, military veterans, and their families manage the pressures of military life and post-war adjustments.

Program Long-Term Success:

Each year, the program: -- reaches between 320 - 400 veterans, providers and family members annually through counseling and outreach -- Trains 6 psychology doctoral candidates and one MSW intern in combat related mental health issues and military cultural sensitivity -- Provide briefings and referrals to 100 veterans exiting the military -- Achieves a 50% reduction in feelings of anxiety, depression, and PTSD symptoms as a result of mental health assessments, peer counseling/support, and direct services (individual therapy) as measured by the OQ-45, BDI-II/BAI-II, and/or PCL-M. (Not every student coming in will receive all measures unless it is clinically indicated).

Program Short-Term Success:

Participants achieve a reduction in feelings of anxiety, depression and PTSD symptoms.

Program Success Monitored by:

Metrics are monitored and reported quarterly to senior leadership, the Board of Directors and funders.

Program Success Examples:

Jim P., an Army veteran who served in Afghanistan, learned of Outside the Wire while attending Santa Monica Community College. He was struggling to make the transition back to civilian life, succeed in his classes and maintain a job in the private security field. As his depression and PTSD symptoms continued to take a toll, he dropped classes and worried about maintaining his job and finances. As a result of the ongoing counseling he receives through Outside the Wire and support from U.S.VETS’ Veteran’s Re-entry Project, Jim says he is “able to keep my emotional balance, succeed in my classes and manage my anxiety and depression… I am excited about what the future holds.”

Program: Veterans Re-Entry Project (VRP) (GuideStar Exchange,
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January 2015)

Budget:
$104,000
Category:
Homeless
Population Served:
Military/Veterans
Homeless
Disabled, General or Disability Unspecified

Program Description:

Veterans Reentry Project (VRP), at U.S.VETS – Long Beach, targets the special needs of at-risk veterans recently separated from military service. Veterans receive case management, employment services, peer support, resource information, referrals to the VA and community-based programs, and educational and therapeutic groups to address the transition from military life to the civilian community. The goals of the program are to improve the health of this vulnerable veteran population by addressing military service members’ unmet need for treatment due to service-related psychological injuries, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), traumatic brain injury (TBI), and major depression, as a result of experiences in in the military and combat.

Program Long-Term Success:

Veterans achieve housing stability: (80% maintain permanent housing as of the end of the program year or exit to other permanent housing during the year) and income stability: (60% increase and/or maintain their income through employment or disability benefits).

Program Short-Term Success:

Clients benefit from strong peer reinforcement, opportunities to participate in therapeutic groups and activities, and a team of trained staff, student interns, and volunteers who assist them in becoming increasingly self-sufficient.

Program Success Monitored by:

U.S. VETS’ approach is outcomes driven. Successful program performance is determined by data that indicates steps towards self-sufficiency: remaining stable in housing, obtaining employment or increased income, maintaining sobriety. This is assessed through monthly performance and fiscal reporting that is overseen by the Site Directors, the Vice President of Programs, and the Vice President of Operations & Compliance. Outcomes are regularly reported to the Board of Directors and funders. To ensure the efficacy and efficiency of the programs, executive and program staff meets regularly to assess the monthly data reports, share anecdotal evidence, review best practices, and reevaluate core competencies to make program adjustments as necessary.

Program Success Examples:

“No problem or situation is so large that there is no hope” says Michael F, an Army veteran who served with distinction in Iraq. Michael struggled with anxiety, depression and PTSD upon his return home and made “bad choices” that eventually led to the loss of his job and apartment. Of that time in his life, Michael says “I wouldn’t face up to my responsibilities or resolve issues from my past.” Hearing about U.S.VETS from a friend, Michael “began on the road to rebuild myself as a productive and self-sufficient member of society… I am now gainfully employed and working towards a career. People he cares about are proud of him and Michael says “quietly kept, I’m proud of myself… Believe in yourself and you will see that there is light at the end of the tunnel. There is no problem or situation too large”.

Program: Supportive Services for Veteran Families (SSVF) (GuideStar Exchange,
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January 2015)

Budget:
$3,000,000
Category:
Military & Veterans
Population Served:
Military/Veterans
Adults
Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Program Description:

The program helps low income veteran families transition to permanent housing and helps those at risk of homelessness to maintain their housing. SSVF takes a holistic approach that links social services with legal assistance to assist very-low and extremely-low income veteran families transition to permanent housing and ensure Veteran families occupying permanent housing are able to maintain their housing. Roughly two-thirds of program resources are used to help very-low and extremely-low income veteran families transition to permanent housing within 90 days and one-third to help veteran families maintain their current permanent housing. SSVF provides outreach services, case management, assistance with obtaining VA benefits, and assistance with obtaining other public benefits as well as temporary financial assistance (e.g. rental assistance, security deposit, etc.), housing assistance, job readiness training, financial literacy and money management training, and legal assistance to increase the long term housing stability of veteran families.

Program Long-Term Success:

Over 4,800 veterans and family members were assisted in maintaining housing stability last fiscal year, including 1,430 children.

Program Short-Term Success:

Veteran families receive the financial assistance and services needed to maintain housing stability and enhance their wellbeing.

Program Success Monitored by:

U.S. VETS’ approach is outcomes driven. Successful program performance is determined by data that indicates steps towards self-sufficiency: remaining stable in housing, obtaining employment or increased income, maintaining sobriety. This is assessed through monthly performance and fiscal reporting that is overseen by the Site Directors, the Vice President of Programs, and the Vice President of Operations & Compliance. Outcomes are regularly reported to the Board of Directors and funders. To ensure the efficacy and efficiency of the programs, executive and program staff meets regularly to assess the monthly data reports, share anecdotal evidence, review best practices, and reevaluate core competencies to make program adjustments as necessary.

Program Success Examples:

After returning home from service, Arleen S. went to school and got a job but couldn’t make ends meet. She and her family moved to Houston because the job market seemed strong and the cost of living wasn’t as high as where they were. After the move, her husband found a job right away, but she struggled to find employment. “We were staying with family, five of us crammed into a one-bedroom apartment. We needed to get a place of our own, but we didn’t have a lot in savings and couldn’t find a place in our price range. We looked into Section 8 and income-based housing. I tried to get registered with VASH, but hadn’t made much progress. Eventually we were coming down to the wire. We had only a couple of days until we had to move out of our current living situation.” Arleen “discovered U.S.VETS by accident” and came to see a Case Manager “one week before my family and I had to leave the apartment where we were staying”. The following week – the week before Christmas – she and her family moved into their new apartment. With U.S.VETS’ help, Arleen is now employed full-time and she and her husband can provide the stability their children need to thrive. “I’m grateful for the warm and welcoming staff at U.S.VETS. I didn’t feel any of the shame that can often be felt in situations where you need help. They extended themselves above and went beyond the call of duty. If not for their genuine giving and loving spirit, my family – like so many female veteran families – would slip through the cracks.”

Program: Permanent Housing Program (GuideStar Exchange,
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January 2015)

Budget:
$2,979,679
Category:
Homeless
Population Served:
Military/Veterans
Homeless
Disabled, General or Disability Unspecified

Program Description:

Provides rental assistance subsidies and supportive services including outreach, case management, sobriety support and participation in therapeutic groups for veterans who are homeless and have a medically certified disability. The goals of the program are housing retention, increased income and benefits and increased self determination.

Program Long-Term Success:

80% of clients remain in permanent housing; 80% maintain sobriety; 54% maintain or increase their total income (from all sources) as of the end of the operating year or program exit.

Program Short-Term Success:

Clients achieve housing stability and greater self determination.

Program Success Monitored by:

Metrics monitored monthly and reported to senior leadership, the Board of Directors and funders.

Program Success Examples:

Program: Father's Program (GuideStar Exchange,
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January 2015)

Budget:
$482,994
Category:
Programs for Single Parents
Population Served:
Military/Veterans
Homeless
Male Adults

Program Description:

The goal of this program is to reconnect noncustodial fathers with their children. The program provides the same services as the Veterans in Progress program with additional services such as parenting, fatherhood education and managing conflict. Additionally, fathers take responsibility for child support payments.

Program Long-Term Success:

Participants successfully reconnect with their children and take responsibility for child support payments.

Program Short-Term Success:

Program Success Monitored by:

U.S. VETS’ approach is outcomes driven. Successful program performance is determined by data that indicates steps towards self-sufficiency: remaining stable in housing, obtaining employment or increased income, maintaining sobriety. This is assessed through monthly performance and fiscal reporting that is overseen by the Site Directors, the Vice President of Programs, and the Vice President of Operations & Compliance. Outcomes are regularly reported to the Board of Directors and funders. To ensure the efficacy and efficiency of the programs, executive and program staff meets regularly to assess the monthly data reports, share anecdotal evidence, review best practices, and reevaluate core competencies to make program adjustments as necessary.

Program Success Examples:

U.S. VETS’ approach is outcomes driven. Successful program performance is determined by data that indicates steps towards self-sufficiency: remaining stable in housing, obtaining employment or increased income, maintaining sobriety. This is assessed through monthly performance and fiscal reporting that is overseen by the Site Directors, the Vice President of Programs, and the Vice President of Operations & Compliance. Outcomes are regularly reported to the Board of Directors and funders. To ensure the efficacy and efficiency of the programs, executive and program staff meets regularly to assess the monthly data reports, share anecdotal evidence, review best practices, and reevaluate core competencies to make program adjustments as necessary.

Program: Supportive Independent Living (Disabled Veterans & Seniors) (GuideStar Exchange,
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January 2015)

Budget:
$480,763
Category:
Elderly and/or Disabled
Population Served:
Military/Veterans
Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens
Disabled, General or Disability Unspecified

Program Description:

Provides intensive services to disabled veterans and seniors with disabilities. Veterans receive one-on-one case management and support from educational and therapeutic groups including money management, managing mental and physical health, problem solving, social skills and healthy recreation.

Program Long-Term Success:

Homeless veterans who are either disabled or seniors with disabilities receive the support they need to maintain housing stability and enhance self-sufficiency.

Program Short-Term Success:

Program Success Monitored by:

U.S. VETS’ approach is outcomes driven. Successful program performance is determined by data that indicates steps towards self-sufficiency: remaining stable in housing, obtaining employment or increased income, maintaining sobriety. This is assessed through monthly performance and fiscal reporting that is overseen by the Site Directors, the Vice President of Programs, and the Vice President of Operations & Compliance. Outcomes are regularly reported to the Board of Directors and funders. To ensure the efficacy and efficiency of the programs, executive and program staff meets regularly to assess the monthly data reports, share anecdotal evidence, review best practices, and reevaluate core competencies to make program adjustments as necessary.

Program Success Examples:

After being an emergency medical tech for years and raising two sons on his own, Darryl S. hit rock bottom. "I raised two boys to be men of integrity and honor," said Darryl, who served in the U.S. Air Force. "But after the kids left home I lost my focus." Darryl said his life quickly went downhill when he started drinking to deal with the Post Traumatic Stress Disorder he'd developed from work and losing two children with his first wife. "When I first came here, I had nothing," Silvius said. "Being in the very secure environment U.S. VETS provides has been a lifesaver… They push you in the directions you need to go.” Today, Darryl’s living situation is stable and he is taking classes at a local community college. He says his grown sons are proud of how he's turned his life around. "U.S. VETS has helped rebuild me from the ground up."

Program: Chronically Homeless (CHAMPS Program) (GuideStar Exchange,
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January 2015)

Budget:
$1,229,551
Category:
Military & Veterans
Population Served:
Military/Veterans
Homeless
Disabled, General or Disability Unspecified

Program Description:

Permanent supportive housing program specializing in providing rental assistance subsidies and long-term supportive services including outreach, case management, sobriety support and participation in therapeutic groups for homeless veterans who qualify as chronically homeless and have a medically certified disability.

Program Long-Term Success:

70% of clients enrolled in the program obtain employment or increase their income through eligible benefits; 70% maintain housing six months after placement; 80% maintain sobriety.

Program Short-Term Success:

Chronically homeless veterans attain residential stability and increased self-sufficiency.

Program Success Monitored by:

U.S. VETS’ approach is outcomes driven. Successful program performance is determined by data that indicates steps towards self-sufficiency: remaining stable in housing, obtaining employment or increased income, maintaining sobriety. This is assessed through monthly performance and fiscal reporting that is overseen by the Site Directors, the Vice President of Programs, and the Vice President of Operations & Compliance. Outcomes are regularly reported to the Board of Directors and funders. To ensure the efficacy and efficiency of the programs, executive and program staff meets regularly to assess the monthly data reports, share anecdotal evidence, review best practices, and reevaluate core competencies to make program adjustments as necessary.

Program Success Examples:

Program: Outreach to Homeless Veterans (GuideStar Exchange,
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January 2015)

Budget:
$140,167
Category:
Military & Veterans
Population Served:
Military/Veterans
Homeless
Disabled, General or Disability Unspecified

Program Description:

U.S.VETS has a unique capacity and a wealth of experience conducting outreach to veterans. Many homeless and at-risk veterans are reluctant to seek out needed services because of bad experiences with the “system.” U.S. VETS’ outreach team builds trust by meeting homeless veterans where they currently reside. Over 50% of the homeless veterans served by this project previously lived on the streets, under bridges, in emergency shelters, or in other places not meant for human habitation; the remainder come from treatment programs or housing for persons who originally came from the streets or shelters. U.S.VETS’ county-wide outreach teams (which includes formerly homeless veterans) makes regular visits to agencies and community based organizations in communities throughout the country (CA, AZ, DC, NV, MO, TX, HI). Outreach staff attend service provider meetings in the community and make presentations to promote program awareness at seminars and conferences related to homeless veterans. The team organizes quarterly outreach and project awareness workshops in parks, on beaches, and other gathering places for the homeless. U.S.VETS has staff designated to conduct weekly outreach meetings and recruit veterans from local Military Community Relation Offices and Military Installations, coordinate partnerships with local Veterans service providers and VSO's, participate in the local Veterans Employment Committees (VEC), and outreach at all veteran job fairs. Staff coordinate all activity with EDD, VESS, VWS and TAP trainers. Outreach personnel also work through the local EDD one stop centers to identify and receive any recently separated veterans.

Program Long-Term Success:

Over 118,000 homeless veterans engaged through outreach since U.S.VETS opened its doors.

Program Short-Term Success:

7,990 homeless veterans engaged through outreach last year.

Program Success Monitored by:

U.S. VETS’ approach is outcomes driven. Successful program performance is determined by data that indicates steps towards self-sufficiency: remaining stable in housing, obtaining employment or increased income, maintaining sobriety. This is assessed through monthly performance and fiscal reporting that is overseen by the Site Directors, the Vice President of Programs, and the Vice President of Operations & Compliance. Outcomes are regularly reported to the Board of Directors and funders. To ensure the efficacy and efficiency of the programs, executive and program staff meets regularly to assess the monthly data reports, share anecdotal evidence, review best practices, and reevaluate core competencies to make program adjustments as necessary.

Program Success Examples:

Over 3,200 people attended the three-day Los Angeles Stand Down organized by U.S.VETS Los Angeles. The goal of the was to give homeless and at-risk veterans a hand up, rather than a hand out. The ultimate goal of the stand down is to help veterans get off the streets and into stable housing. “This is just the start,” said Ivan Mason, Executive Director of U.S.VETS – Los Angeles. “We are really trying to find the chronically homeless and the chronically mentally ill. We are looking, at the end of this, at how many of those individuals we can put into permanent housing.” That is no small task in Los Angeles County, where an estimated 4,200 people who served in the armed forces do not have regular homes. That is more than twice as many homeless veterans as in any other local jurisdiction in the United States. Gary N , 57, worked for more than two decades as a trucker after leaving the Army in the 1980s but fell on hard times when a job injury ruined his wrist and made it impossible for him to even manipulate a gear shift. After losing his mobile home, Gary said, he began sleeping in a Westchester park, with occasional stops at a cold-weather shelter at the Veterans Affairs facility in West Los Angeles. He was thrilled Saturday to have a bad tooth pulled and to get a meal and a new rainbow-colored shirt. He looked forward to a job-counseling session on Sunday. "Some people don't even want to look at us. They don't want to look us in the eye," he said. "Here, there is a little hope. You know what I mean?" Others said more services are still needed. Anthony F. 57, lost his job as a house painter and said he has not been able to find work since. The Army veteran bemoaned the lack of employment for older workers like him and said there seem to be more programs for vets who had severe trauma or substance abuse problems, rather than those who had remained on the straight and narrow. "I was honorably discharged. I didn't get blown up in Vietnam. I don't fit the profile. But a veteran is a veteran is a veteran" he said. "All I want is a job and to get out of my situation." Charlie Pacello, a veteran officer from the Air Force, offered counseling on mindfulness at the event. He said one of the most important lessons for his fellow veterans is that help can be found. "It's so important to get the word out that there are people ready to serve them and to help heal their wounds... "so they can make that return journey home and recover who they really are."
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Impact Summary from the Nonprofit

Each year, U.S.VETS:- Helps more than 1,000 veterans return to full time employment. - Provides intensive program services and housing to 2100 veterans.- Provides transitional housing and services to 2500 veterans.- Provides permanent housing for 250 veterans.- Provides 127 women veterans with housing and need-specific services including military sexual trauma counseling.U.S.VETS contacts thousands of veterans every year in the effort to reach out to at-risk veterans before they become homeless. Homelessness among veterans has been reduced in every community where U.S.VETS operates.
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GuideStar Exchange - Silver Participant What is this?
The GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to regularly update key information directly to GuideStar. It provides richer and broader information about their programs, impact, finances, people and more.

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