Human Services

Kids In Need Foundation

  • Dayton, OH
  • www.kinf.org

Mission Statement

The Kids In Need Foundation is a national 501(c)(3) charitable organization with offices in Dayton, Ohio, and Minneapolis, Minnesota. Founded in 1995, the Foundation's mission is to ensure that every child is prepared to learn and succeed by providing free school supplies nationally to students most in need. The Kids In Need National Network of Resource Centers includes 35 affiliates and 3 jr. affiliates where teachers from low-income schools go to obtain free school supplies for their students. In addition, the Kids In Need Teacher Grants program provides preK-12 educators in the U.S. with funding to support innovative learning experiences for students. Our School Ready Supplies program distributes backpacks filled with supplies in communities not served by Resource Centers. The Second Responder® program provides free backpacks filled with school supplies to students affected by natural disasters.
The Kids In Need Foundation has distributed $700 million in school supplies since its founding, directly benefiting 4.2 million students and 120,000 teachers annually, and has awarded $1.6 million in grants to teachers. Kids In Need has received Charity Navigator's highest four-star rating, indicating that it operates in a fiscally responsible way and outperforms most other charities in America.

Main Programs

  1. Program 1
  2. Teacher Grants Program
  3. School Ready Supplies Program
  4. Kids In Need National Network of Resource Centers
  5. Second Responder®

service areas

National

Self-reported by organization

ruling year

1995

chief executive

Mr. David H Smith

Self-reported by organization

Keywords

Education, School Supplies, Teacher Grants, School Disaster Relief efforts,

Self-reported by organization

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EIN

31-1437587

Physical Address

3055 Kettering Blvd., Ste 119

Dayton, OH 45439 1989

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Impact statement

Children from impoverished families arrive every day at school willing and ready to learn, but lack the needed supplies like pencils, paper and notebooks. Teachers, seeing this need every day, will buy the needed supplies by spending their own money. The Kids In Need Foundation seeks to ease this financial burden by providing an avenue for teachers to obtain these supplies free-of-charge through the Kids In Need National Network of 29 Resource Centers. The Foundation also awards grants to teachers for innovative classroom projects through the Kids In Need Teacher Grants program, as well as assists in the development of community school supplies giveaway programs through its School Ready Supplies program. We do this on a permanent, national basis because of generous corporate partners and sponsors. With more corporate, individual, and community support, the Foundation will be able to serve even more of the more than 16 million children living in poverty who could benefit from the Foundation's year-round work.

Programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Self-reported by organization

Program 1

The mechanism for the distribution of school supplies is our growing network of Resource Centers. Each Center has the look and feel of a small store and teachers are allowed to 'shop' without spending a dime of their own money. There are 24 Resource Centers throughout the country that make up the National Network.

Category

Budget

Population Served

Program 2

Teacher Grants Program

The Kids In Need Foundation awards more than $100,000 annually to certified K-12 teachers for creative classroom projects costing between $100 and $500. Descriptions of the winning projects are published in the Award Winning Project Ideas, available on the website and offered free to teachers.

Category

Education

Budget

269,682

Population Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Program 3

School Ready Supplies Program

The Kids In Need Foundation also partners with national and local companies in communities not served by Kids In Need Resource Centers to provide backpacks full of school supplies to students most in need.

Category

Education

Budget

359,852

Population Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Program 4

Kids In Need National Network of Resource Centers

The Resource Centers are like retail stores where teachers from low income schools can go to obtain free school supplies for their students

Category

Human Services

Budget

85,000,000

Population Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Program 5

Second Responder®

Second Responder® provides free backpacks filled with school supplies to students in communities affected by natural disasters, such as tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, and wild fires.

Category

Human Services

Budget

209,909

Population Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

None

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Self-reported by organization

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    * Procure more product to feed to the Centers, getting free school supplies into the hands of an increased number of children in need

    Expected Outcome: Kids In Need will distribute at least $50 million worth of school supplies to the national network.

    * Support the efforts of the Resource Centers by offering significant education in areas that will have a positive impact on their everyday operations.

    Expected Outcome: Reinforcement to the Centers that being part of the National Network makes a significant impact on their service to teachers and students.

    * Build brand awareness for corporate partners while bringing credibility to the Kids In Need National Network of Resource Centers.

    Expected Outcome: Consumers will appreciate the partnership of trusted and respected global companies and a fiscally responsible and respected nonprofit organization.


    Goal: Procure more product to feed to the Centers, getting free school supplies into the hands of an increased number of children in need

    Outcome: Although procurement was down from the year before, Kids In Need was still able to increase the number of children served by the Resource Centers, adding two new affiliates to the national network and 200,000 more children.

    Goal: Support the efforts of the Resource Centers by offering significant education in areas that will have a positive impact on their everyday operations.

    Outcome: The Summit was held in June of 2012. Training sessions were presented on the following topics: innovative grant writing; marketing and PR tactics; creating advocates; team based problem solving; strategic merchandising; reporting metrics. In 2012, our resource center specialist conducted 2 "lean" trainings at Resource Centers and one Kaizen.

    Goal: Build brand awareness for the Kids In Need National Network of Resource Centers.

    Outcome: This is a difficult one to measure, but Kids In Need makes a concerted effort to cite the support of our cause at every opportunity.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    In keeping with our mission to ensure that every child is prepared to learn and succeed by providing free school supplies nationally to students most in need, the Resource Center program provides free school supplies to impoverished students and underfunded teachers throughout America. To date, Kids In Need has distributed a total of more than $450 million worth of supplies to students, now supporting the classroom readiness of 2.4 million children annually. The National Network of Resource Centers consists of 29 facilities nationwide empowering teachers from qualified high-poverty schools to obtain supplies needed by their students, positively impacting millions of students, resulting in improved test scores, attendance, and classroom behavior. The most critical lasting benefit of providing school supplies to children who would otherwise do without is that these children receive a more thorough and significant education because they are able to participate more effectively in the classroom learning process, so they succeed more often in the classroom.
    Strategic plan goals are: to increase the number of students served to 4.8 million by the end of 2014 and to be the charitable organization that people recognize as the authority to reach kids with supplies in order to prepare them to learn.
    In 2010, 24 Resource Centers served 1.6 million students. One of the ways we are increasing the number of students being served is to add affiliate Resource Centers to the National Network. Another method is to procure and distribute additional product to the Centers in the network so they can add qualified schools to their rosters of those they serve, which means more students receive supplies. Currently, 29 Centers serve 2.4 their rosters and serve more students. Currently the Centers are serving 2.4 million students.
    In 1999 when Kids In Need had opened five Centers, people from all fifty states started contacting us to find out how to start a Resource Center. Finally, we wrote a detailed manual with that information and put it on our website to help grow the concept of getting free supplies to students most in need. We are still contacted regularly by individuals and organizations that want to offer this service to their local schools and students. Media outlets have contacted us for information concerning what teachers spend out of their own pockets to provide their students with supplies. To alleviate teachers of that burden is one of the original reasons the Resource Centers program was established. The thinking of the Board and Committees working to implement the strategic plan is that increasing awareness of what we do will in turn help establish us as the authority in this area. The program is promoted in local media, education publications, education websites, education blogs, mommy blogs, and broadcast emails.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    The purpose/goal of the Resource Centers program is to provide free school supplies to children attending pre-K through 12th grade public, private, parochial, and charter schools in the immediate areas covered by the 29 Resource Centers in the national network that have at least 70 percent of students enrolled in the federal free and reduced lunch program. Teachers from the designated schools are invited to shop at their local Resource Centers to obtain the school supplies needed by their students. The role of the Kids In Need Foundation is to get the school supplies to the Resource Centers to put on their shelves for the teachers to take. We anticipate procuring $50 million worth of supplies to distribute to the Resource Centers serving at least 2.4 million students in the following cities and surrounding areas in the U.S. in 2013: Los Angeles, CA; Rancho Cucamonga, CA; Ft. Lauderdale, FL; Orlando, FL; Tampa, FL; Atlanta, GA; Valdosta, GA; Chicago, IL; Indianapolis, IN; Washington, DC; Portland, ME; Detroit, MI; St. Louis, MO; Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN; Charlotte, NC; Newark, NJ; Bronx, NY; Buffalo, NY; Las Vegas, NV; Cincinnati, OH; Cleveland, OH; Dayton, OH; Portland, OR; Charleston, SC; Beaumont, TX; Dallas/Ft. Worth, TX; McAllen, TX; Seattle, WA; and Philippi (Appalachia), WV.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    With the necessary school supplies, students will succeed at school. This will be demonstrated by better attendance, higher test scores, less disruptive behavior, and improved feelings of self worth. Test scores of students at James Weldon Johnson Elementary School in Chicago indicated the effect of having school supplies was almost immediate.
    • The percentage of students at or above the national norms in reading went from 16% the year before the Resource Center was opened to 18% the first year after students began receiving supplies.
    • Math scores went from 17% to 20% in that same period.
    • Two years later reading scores were up to 27%
    • Math scores were up by 37%
    Principal Mattie Tyson credited much of this improvement to getting supplies from the Kids In Need Resource Center.
    School attendance and behavior also improve. Minneapolis teacher Lisa Hartmann reported that one year after receiving supplies from the Kids In Need Resource Center
    • Number of days of perfect attendance increased by 45%.
    • Average attendance increased by 7%.
    • Only 2 students during the entire year had to be sent from the room because of disruptive behavior.




    We have used and will continue to use information and testimonials gathered from teachers who take the supplies back to their students. It is their stories and statistics that are the true indicators of the program's impact. We will also utilize outcome measurements published by the Centers.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    The Kids In Need Foundation was established in 1995 by the school supplies and office products industry to make a contribution to the well-being of students and teachers, their primary customers. Supported financially at first by the industry's international trade association, the Foundation became self-supporting through corporate and individual financial donations in 2002. The Foundation initially defined two programs -- Resource Centers and Teacher Grants -- as the means to fulfill its mission of providing free school supplies to kids who need them. The Foundation was headquartered in Dayton, Ohio and had two employees. Today the Foundation has offices in both Dayton and Minneaplis, MN, and has 10 employees. In 1997, the Foundation opened its first Resource Center, a free store for teachers, in Chicago. At the time, no other national non-profit organization was claiming this mission nor operating free stores for teachers.

    At the end of 1999, the Foundation had opened five Resource Centers across the country, including the one in Minneapolis, and the concept of a facility set up like a retail store where teachers from low income schools could go to obtain free supplies for their students started catching on. People from all fifty states started contacting us to find out how to start a Resource Center. Finally, we wrote a detailed manual with that information and put it on our website to help grow the concept of getting free supplies to students most in need. In 2006, the Stanford Social Innovation Review of the Stanford University Graduate School of Business cited the free store for teachers concept as an innovative idea that works. Now in 2012, there are 29 Resource Centers in the Kids In Need National Network. Scores of similar facilities operate across the United States that are not part of Kids In Need -- 73 that we know of -- and we still get five or six inquiries about starting a Center every year.
    Since 1995, the Kids In Need Foundation has met all kinds of economic challenges to continue to grow the number of donors, the amount of funds raised, and the number of children and teachers served.
    .

service areas

National

Self-reported by organization

Social Media

@facebook.com/kidsinneed

@twitter.com/kidsinneed

@http://www.linkedin.com/groups?gid=665627

@www.youtube.com/KidsInNeedFoundation

@www.pinterest.com/kidsinneedfndn

@http://www.flickr.com/photos/kidsinneed/

Accreditations

Charity Navigator

Charity Navigator

Charity Navigator

Charity Navigator

Charity Navigator

Charity Navigator

Charity Navigator

photos




External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

KIDS IN NEED FOUNDATION
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Kids In Need Foundation

Leadership

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Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
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CHIEF EXECUTIVE FOR FISCAL YEAR

Mr. David H Smith

BIO

With more than 30 years experience working in the school supplies and office products industry, Dave Smith brings great knowledge to the Kids In Need Foundation as its executive director. Dave was there when the Foundation was established in 1995. Over the years he served as a volunteer on the Board of Directors, chairing the Board for two years, and served on various committees. In 2006, the Board asked Dave to assume the executive director’s position for the Foundation, which he did, and he has led Kids In Need toward increased national awareness for the purpose of serving more children in need. Dave is a native of New Jersey but has lived in Minneapolis for more than 30 years.

STATEMENT FROM THE CEO

"Although we serve 2.4 million students annually, it is important that we continue to help more children.  The need is so great, and with school budget cuts and a generally poor economy, more and more families cannot provide the basic school supplies needed by their children.  Kids In Need must acquire new donors to see that all students are able to participate in classroom learning experiences."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Bill Douthit

Community Advocate

Term: Jan 2012 - Dec 2012

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?