Public, Society Benefit

MINNESOTA INDIAN WOMENS RESOURCE CENTER

  • Minneapolis, MN
  • www.miwrc.org

Mission Statement

To empower American Indian women and families to exercise their cultural values and integrity, and to achieve sustainable life ways, while advocating for justice and equity.

Main Programs

  1. Minnesota Indian Womens Resource Center Programs

service areas

International

Self-reported by organization

ruling year

1985

chief executive

Ms. Suzanne Koepplinger

Self-reported by organization

co-chief executive

Mrs. Joni Buffalohead

Self-reported by organization

Keywords

American Indian women, sex trafficking, chemical dependancy, domestic violence, culturally specific

Self-reported by organization

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EIN

41-1500950

Also Known As

MIWRC

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Impact statement

MIWRC has developed programs to include a "circle of service" that addresses family, community and public policy issues that impact the Native American population.

Programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Self-reported by organization

Program 1

Minnesota Indian Womens Resource Center Programs

Family Stabilization, Parenting Groups, Supportive Housing, Library/Training Program, Cherish The Children Learning Center, Chemical Dependency Harm Reduction, and Sexual Assault Advocacy.

 

Cherish the Children Learning Center provides daily quality early learning for the entire community.

 

Family Stabilization Services are designed to keep families safely together, and/or to reuify chilren with their families through Life Skills Parenting and other programs.

 

Housing Services.  In addition to asisting the families that reside in our 13 supportive housing units, MIWRC began a partnership with Hennepin County to provide Family Homeless Prevention and Assistance Program Services.

 

Life Skills Prenting Program to provide culturally specific mentoring and training to help preserve and reunify families.

 

NAPTR blends traditional teaching teaching and western best practice methods to maximize learning and parenting opportunities for Native families everywhere.

 

Healing Journey Program is a chemical dependancy program to improve the lives of chemically dependant Indian women, while reducing the cost to Hennepin County for health and emergency room care.

 

Secual Assault Advocacy Program  - due to the high rates of sexual violence victimization amoun Indian women, it is imperative to provide sexual assault advocacy specific to the cultural needs of Native women.

 

Phoenix/Oskinigiikwe Programs - partnership with the Division of Indian Work, Minneapois police and Hennepin County Probation teams to reach out to 13-17 year old American Indian girls at risk of sexual exploitation.

 

The Learning Center promotes knowledge and improves the social service worker's ability to work more effectively with American Indian Women and their families.

Category

None

Budget

$2,280,516.00

Population Served

Females, all ages or age unspecified

Native Americans/American Indians

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Self-reported by organization

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    MIWRC's goal is to deepen the quality of services and continue to advocate for our clients as well as women and families in the community.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    For the years 2014-2016, MIWRC plans to be financially sustainable from program revenue, create an agency wide client database to provide outcomes, and to continue to be the standard of best practices in the industry.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    MIWRC can provide Native women and families the following program services: childcare, housing, emergency assistance, treatment for chemical dependency, mental health counselling, parenting classes, and domestic violence assistance.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Reporting finds that early intervention to avoid sex trading and trafficking of Minnesota's female youth passes rigorous benefit-cost test with a return on investment of $34 in benefit for each $1 in cost.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    MIWRC continues to be able to provide services to over $4,000 individuals in the community. This amount served is expected to go up in the area of mental health services.

service areas

International

Self-reported by organization

External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

MINNESOTA INDIAN WOMEN'S RESOURCE CENTER
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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  • Forms 990 for 2013, 2012 and 2011
  • Board Chair, Board Co-Chair and Board Members
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

MINNESOTA INDIAN WOMENS RESOURCE CENTER

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2013, 2012 and 2011
  • Board Chair, Board Co-Chair and Board Members
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CHIEF EXECUTIVE FOR FISCAL YEAR

Ms. Suzanne Koepplinger

co-chief executive

Mrs. Joni Buffalohead

BIO

Suzanne Koepplinger has been the Executive Director of the Minnesota Indian Women's Resource Center since December of 2003. She has a background in international project development and management, communications, domestic violence advocacy, and fundraising. Suzanne serves on the State of Minnesota Children's Justice Initiative/Alcohol and Other Drugs (CJI/AOD) Core Team, Metro Urban Indian Directors (MUID) Group, MACC Alliance of Connected Communities Board of Directors, and the Greater Twin Cities United Way Council of Agency Executives - Executive Committee Treasurer and CAE Representative to the Success by Six Committee. Civic/volunteer activities include serving on the Steering Committee for the Sheila Wellstone Institute, on the FBI Civil Rights Advisory Group, and as international team leader for Global Citizens Network, bringing volunteers into indigenous communities around the globe. Suzanne is of Canadian Mohawk and European ancestry, holds a Masters degree in the Art of Leadership from Augsburg College and is a Certified Substance Abuse Prevention Specialist.

STATEMENT FROM THE CEO

"I love the focus of our report to the community and all stakeholders for 2012 on inter generational hope – for what else should we focus on but the continued healing and wellness of all members of our families? We cannot silo one individual or one issue and approach it as the sole problem requiring our attention; rather we intentionally use a holistic framework that incorporates all generations and systems in designing and delivering strength based community services.

In the past year, this agency once again served over 4,000 individuals with a continuum of direct service, community engagement, and systems change activities. We joined a national network of individuals and organizations dedicated to re-igniting the movement to end violence against girls and women through our membership in the NoVo Foundation’s Move to End Violence. The agency embarked on an exploration of what a more culturally congruent leadership structure looks like for a Native non-profit, and is now building internal leadership development protocols within our workforce. Our focus on combining thoughtful research and community input has helped us create innovative new services to better meet the needs of our community, urge transformational social change, and ground our operations in transparency and accountability.

We never do this work in a vacuum. We rely upon partners and supporters like you. As I write this, we are finalizing our 2014 – 2016 Strategic Plan. It gives us a clear direction – to focus on being proactive, connected, and courageous. Our community deserves no less from us and we look forward to working with all of you to build the hope of the next generation.

-Suzanne Koepplinger"

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Becky Beane

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?