Human Services

The Oasis Institute

  • St. Louis, MO
  • www.oasisnet.org

Mission Statement

Our mission is to promote successful aging through a three-fold approach: lifelong learning, healthy living and social engagement.

Main Programs

  1. Lifelong Learning
  2. CATCH Healthy Habits
  3. Lifelong Learning
  4. Volunteerism

service areas

National

Self-reported by organization

ruling year

2001

chief executive

Ms. Marcia Kerz

Self-reported by organization

Keywords

aging, seniors, elderly, enrichment, education, oasis, mature, older

Self-reported by organization

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EIN

43-1830354

Physical Address

7710 Carondelet Ave Ste 125

St. Louis, MO 63105

Also Known As

OASIS

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Services to Promote the Independence of Specific Populations (P80)

Adult, Continuing Education (B60)

Community Health Systems (E21)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Impact statement

OASIS is a pioneer in the field of successful aging, enabling adults age 50 plus to live healthy, productive lifestyles through a three-fold approach:

Lifelong Learning- the need to challenge the mind and continue personal growth. Programs in Lifelong Learning include Connections Technology Training as well as a variety of classes in arts & humanities, history and several other areas of interest.

Health Promotion- the importance of physical activity, nutrition and managing health risks to sustain an independent, active life. OASIS regularly conducts exercise and health education classes in addition to several evidence-based health programs such as Chronic Disease and Diabetes Self Management, Active Start, Matter of Balance and many others.

Volunteer Engagement- the desire to devote one’s time, energy and experience to meet community needs. OASIS volunteer opportunities include serving as class instructors and peer leaders, providing program support and recruiting other volunteers. Volunteers in intergenerational programs participate through OASIS Tutoring and CATCH Healthy Habits.

With education, advocacy and intergenerational programs, the impact of OASIS goes far beyond the older adults served. Intergenerational tutors, health volunteers and key partners are enhancing the lives of children and communities in 40 cities and 24 states across the country.

Programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Self-reported by organization

Program 1

Lifelong Learning

Education: OASIS staff work with their local communities and with members to develop educational programs. Each center publishes a catalog of course offerings three times a year. Topics include arts and humanities, science, health and health promotion, technology, financial planning, consumer affairs and cultural events. Educational formats range from one-time classes to in-depth series lasting six weeks or more. The Institute develops national program models and provides curricula, materials and support for their implementation. One example is Lewis & Clark: Journey to Another America, developed with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Health: Mature adults are keenly interested in learning how they can maintain their health and independence. The Institute has developed HealthStages TM as a proactive program designed to reduce health risks for mature adults by helping them understand and address their changing health needs. Fifteen courses cover nutrition, exercise, disease management, sensory changes, mental health, memory and general health promotion. In 2002, The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation provided funds to The Institute to pilot a health program, Active Living Every Day, that encourages mature adults to become more active as they age based on the research that ties late-life physical activity to successful aging. In 2003, the U.S. Administration on Aging awarded the Los Angeles Department of Aging a demonstration grant in which OASIS serves as the contractor to provide an intervention model to increase physical activity among mature adults in the Los Angeles area. Technology: OASIS Connections is a program to help mature adults use technology and the Internet to connect with friends, family, information and resources by expanding Internet training, increasing access to the Internet and providing volunteer opportunities using technology. It provides Internet access and training available through new computer labs and educational programs, made possible by a grant from the Technology Opportunities Program (TOP) of the United States Department of Commerce with additional support from SBC Foundation and May Department Stores Company. A newly designed OASIS website, www.oasisnet.org, is used in the classes and provides a way for mature adults to communicate, post messages, shop, research and learn on-line. Volunteerism: OASIS volunteers provide service as mentors to youth at risk, instructors, center assistants, and in community service projects. Currently, 8,000 volunteers have contributed more than 612,200 hours. Through OASIS? Intergenerational Tutoring Program, tutors are trained and work one-on-one each week with 5-9 year-old children in elementary schools to build the child?s reading skills and confidence. OASIS cooperates with 103 school districts and 925 schools in 21 cities. Currently, nearly 6,000 tutors work with 13,000 children annually.

Category

None

Budget

Population Served

None

None

None

Program 2

CATCH Healthy Habits

The OASIS CATCH Healthy Habits Program is an intergenerational nutrition/activity program that  partners older adults with children in grades 3-5 to implement CATCH (Coordinated Approach to Child Health), an evidence-based, nationally recognized school nutrition/physical activity curriculum. CATCH (http://www.sph.uth.tmc.edu/catch/(http://www.sph.uth.tmc.edu/catch/) ) is a coordinated school health program which builds an alliance of parents, teachers, child nutrition personnel, school staff, and community partners to teach children and their families how to be healthy for a lifetime. OASIS piloted a modified version of the CATCH After School program by using older adult volunteers to teach 8 interactive lessons.

Category

None

Budget

Population Served

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

None

Program 3

Lifelong Learning

Not available

Category

Human Services

Budget

Population Served

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Program 4

Volunteerism

Intergenerational programs, health volunteers, administrative volunteers, community involvement and class instruction

Category

Human Services

Budget

Population Served

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Self-reported by organization

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    The mission of OASIS is to promote successful aging for adults age 50 plus through lifelong learning, health promotion and volunteer engagement.

    The OASIS vision is to see that adults age 50 and older across the country have opportunities to pursue vibrant, healthy, productive and meaningful lives. OASIS seeks to positively impact their lives through partnership to share knowledge, offer research-based programs, conduct evaluations and adapt to meet the needs of diverse audiences.

    Goals for 2013 are to:
    • Increase and diversify participation while maintaining program excellence
    • Increase financial sustainability and operational efficiency
    • Increase social impact
    • Increase volunteer engagement
    • Improve the field of aging by the dissemination of research findings and the sharing of best practices
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    OASIS is a pioneer in the field of successful aging, enabling adults age 50 plus to live healthy, productive lifestyles through a three-fold approach:
    Lifelong Learning- the need to challenge the mind and continue personal growth. Programs in Lifelong Learning include Connections Technology Training as well as a variety of classes in arts & humanities, history and several other areas of interest.

    Health Promotion- the importance of physical activity, nutrition and managing health risks to sustain an independent, active life. OASIS regularly conducts exercise and health education classes in addition to several evidence-based health programs such as Chronic Disease and Diabetes Self Management, Active Start, Matter of Balance and many others.

    Volunteer Engagement- the desire to devote one’s time, energy and experience to meet community needs. OASIS volunteer opportunities include serving as class instructors and peer leaders, providing program support and recruiting other volunteers. Volunteers in intergenerational programs participate through OASIS Tutoring and CATCH Healthy Habits.

    With education, advocacy and intergenerational programs, the impact of OASIS goes far beyond the older adults served. Intergenerational tutors, health volunteers and key partners are enhancing the lives of children and communities in 43 cities and 24 states across the country.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Founded in 1982, OASIS offers programs through partnerships in 10 full-service centers, 43 cities and 24 states across the country. The OASIS national network of more than 650 partners and OASIS education sites serves diverse audiences. Partners include health providers, corporations, senior centers, community organizations, libraries, universities and colleges, senior living organizations and more. By scaling through partnerships OASIS is able to take its programs to any community and programs are selected and implemented based on each community’s local needs. More than 59,000 individuals participate in OASIS programs each year. The OASIS Institute is the national headquarters and oversees staff who provide OASIS programs in the St. Louis metro area.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    OASIS is committed to implementing and measuring evidence-based programs throughout the country to increase social impact.
    • The organization is undergoing a partnership with Maryville University in St. Louis to conduct a formal evaluation of the impact of the OASIS Intergenerational Tutoring program on children's reading scores.
    • The Washington University in St. Louis Friedman Center on Aging has entered into a formal relationship with OASIS to conduct applied research on productive aging.
    • Ten public library systems across the country are now working with OASIS to provide the evidence-based OASIS Connections technology curriculum to older library patrons seeking opportunities to build their skills and confidence for using technology to re-enter the workforce or to stay in touch with family and friends.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    OASIS programs benefited 59,000 people in 2012. The organization offers a number of programs that are evidence-based or research-informed:
    • LIFELONG LEARNING
    Connections Technology Training: A study by the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine published in 2012 shows that the introductory OASIS Connections technology training courses are effective in increasing the knowledge, skills, comfort and use of computers by older adults. OASIS will double the number of communities offering Connections technology training - from 20 to 40 communities - within two years.
    • HEALTH PROMOTION
    Chronic Disease and Diabetes Self-Management Programs: OASIS has implemented the evidence-based Chronic Disease Self-Management Program in 6 cities since 2007, reaching 500 participants through in-person and online workshops and is currently engaged in an innovative medical claims study of the Diabetes Self-Management Program in partnership with the National Council on Aging and Stanford University.

    Over the next 2 years, OASIS will increase its projected participation in the Diabetes Self-Management Program by 40%. We will expand the program in the St Louis and Indianapolis metropolitan areas and initiate the program in the Los Angeles, San Antonio, and San Diego.

    • VOLUNTEER ENGAGEMENT
    Intergenerational Tutoring: Since 1989, 100,000 trained volunteers have tutored more than 350,000 youth. A 2010 study of a summer reading program utilizing OASIS tutors revealed that 63% of students maintained their school year-end reading levels. In addition, 100% of OASIS tutors felt that the program added a positive element to their lives and 96% planned to continue in the program.

    Through a three-year scaling initiative OASIS plans to achieve two overarching goals for the Intergenerational Tutoring Program:
    Goal 1: Implement a new scaling plan that is self-sustaining, using three distinct partnership models: 1) a national partnership with a youth-serving organization to reach additional adults and children through expansion to its local affiliates; 2) local adoption of the program by community partners; and 3) direct purchase of the program by school districts. The goal is to recruit additional volunteers in the 107 current districts and expand to 20 new sites by the end of 2015. Over a three-year period, 3,600 new OASIS tutors will join the existing 6,000 volunteers to reach a total of 36,000 additional at-risk youth through 127 partnerships across the United States.
    Goal 2: Increase the evidence base for the program: OASIS Tutoring is presently viewed as a valued resource by school districts because its activities are research-based and align with U.S. Common Core State Standards. To make adoption of the program by all partners the most attractive investment possible, OASIS will establish it as an evidence-based program by carrying out a two-year research study in partnership with Maryville University in St. Louis.

service areas

National

Self-reported by organization

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

THE OASIS INSTITUTE
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

The Oasis Institute

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2012
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Knowledge Base Search
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CHIEF EXECUTIVE FOR FISCAL YEAR

Ms. Marcia Kerz

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Matthew Geekie

No Affiliation

Term: Jan 2012 - Dec 2012

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


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CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


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ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


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BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


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BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?