Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy

Marijuana Policy Project Foundation

  • Washington, DC
  • www.mpp.org

Mission Statement

MPP Foundation envisions a nation where marijuana is legally regulated similarly to alcohol, marijuana education is honest and realistic, and treatment for problem marijuana users is non-coercive and geared toward reducing harm. We work to achieve this vision through four primary missions:

1. Increase public support for non-punitive, non-coercive marijuana policies. 

2. Identify and activate supporters of non-punitive, non-coercive marijuana policies. 

3. Change state laws to reduce or eliminate penalties for the medical and non-medical use of marijuana. 

4. Gain influence in Congress.

Main Programs

  1. Public Education and Media Outreach
  2. Grants Program
  3. Patient Financial Assistance
  4. Coalition Building and VIP Outreach
  5. Ballot Initiatives

service areas

National

Self-reported by organization

ruling year

1997

chief executive for fy 1995

Mr. Robert Kampia

Self-reported by organization

Keywords

marijuana, drug policy

Self-reported by organization

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EIN

52-1975211

Also Known As

MPP Foundation

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (R01)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Impact statement

MPP, which was founded in January 1995, is the largest organization in the U.S. that's focused solely on ending marijuana prohibition. MPP has been responsible for changing most of the state marijuana laws that have been reformed since 2000. Most importantly, MPP legalized marijuana in Colorado in 2012, and then followed up by legalizing marijuana in Alaska in 2014. MPP also decriminalized marijuana possession via a ballot initiative in Massachusetts in 2008. Since then, MPP passed similar laws through the Delaware, Maryland, Rhode Island, and Vermont legislatures. Lastly, MPP was instrumental or entirely responsible for legalizing medical marijuana in Arizona, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont, and the District of Columbia between 2000 and 2014.

Programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Self-reported by organization

Program 1

Public Education and Media Outreach

Respond to inquiries from reporters and pitch stories to the media. Research, update, and publish brochures, briefing papers, and informational reports for public consumption. Maintain a database of members and allies. Produce a series of educational videos for mpp.org and an online blog. Produced a 19-minute DVD educating the public on the effects of prohibition.

Category

Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy

Budget

$477,000.00

Population Served

Adults

Program 2

Grants Program

Grants are awarded to organizations and projects that articulate effective tactics and
strategies to regulate marijuana similarly to alcohol and to make
marijuana available for medical use. Grants are not awarded to
hemp-related projects, state ballot initiatives, or political campaigns.

Category

Philanthropy, Voluntarism & Grantmaking

Budget

$825,000.00

Population Served

Adults

Program 3

Patient Financial Assistance

Pay registration fees to Colorado, Montana, Nevada, and Vermont governments to obtain medical marijuana ID cards for patients with demonstrated financial need in order to protect patients from state arrest.

Category

Health Care

Budget

$3,000.00

Population Served

Disabled, General or Disability Unspecified

Program 4

Coalition Building and VIP Outreach

Attend and speak at conferences; build relationships with allies; build a coalition of actors, directors, producers, musicians, and other VIPs to speak out and perform benefits in support of marijuana policy reform; host annual fundraising party at the Playboy Mansion in Los Angeles.

Category

Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy

Budget

$208,000.00

Population Served

Adults

Program 5

Ballot Initiatives

Donate money to ballot initiatives and promote initiatives to the news media.

Category

Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy

Budget

$225,000.00

Population Served

Adults

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Self-reported by organization

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    MPP Foundation envisions a nation where marijuana is legally regulated similarly to alcohol, marijuana education is honest and realistic, and treatment for problem marijuana users is non-coercive and geared toward reducing harm. MPP Foundation's mission is to change federal law to allow states to determine their own marijuana policies without federal interference, as well as to regulate marijuana like alcohol in all 50 states, D.C., and the five territories.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    1. Increase public support for non-punitive, non-coercive marijuana policies.

    2. Identify and activate supporters of non-punitive, non-coercive marijuana policies.

    3. Change state laws to reduce or eliminate penalties for the medical and non-medical use of marijuana.

    4. Gain influence in Congress.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    MPP is leading the effort in Washington, D.C. to pass federal medical marijuana legislation, as well as to replace marijuana prohibition with a system of sensible regulation and control. MPP also works for sensible marijuana policies at the state level, and our grassroots and lobbying campaigns have changed several laws. MPP changes state laws through legislatures as well as through ballot initiatives. MPP provided the bulk of the funding, staff, and expertise to the 2012 Colorado initiative to legalize and regulate marijuana for adults 21 and older and the 2014 legalization and regulation campaign in Alaska. In addition, MPP monitors and analyzes all marijuana-related bills in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

    MPP has approximately 30 employees, two-thirds of whom are based in MPP's headquarters in Washington, D.C.; this includes two full-time lobbyists on Capitol Hill. In addition, MPP usually has lobbyists on retainer in six or seven state capitals.

  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    MPP's ultimate goal is to change federal law to allow states to determine their own marijuana policies without federal interference, as well as to regulate marijuana like alcohol in all 50 states, D.C., and the five territories. We primarily measure our progress in terms of how many marijuana laws we've successfully changed at both the state and federal level. We also closely monitor national and local polling data to analyze the shifting of public opinion in favor of reforming marijuana laws.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Most importantly, MPP legalized marijuana in Colorado in 2012, and then followed up by legalizing marijuana in Alaska in 2014. MPP also decriminalized marijuana possession via a ballot initiative in Massachusetts in 2008. Since then, MPP passed similar laws through the Delaware, Maryland, Rhode Island, and Vermont legislatures. Lastly, MPP was instrumental or entirely responsible for legalizing medical marijuana in Arizona, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont, and the District of Columbia between 2000 and 2014. Along with our allies, we aim to pass at least 12 more laws to regulate marijuana like alcohol by 2019.

service areas

National

Self-reported by organization

Blog

The organization's Blog

Social Media

@https://www.facebook.com/MarijuanaPolicyProject

@https://twitter.com/marijuanapolicy

@https://www.youtube.com/user/MPPstaff

External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

MARIJUANA POLICY PROJECT FOUNDATION
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Marijuana Policy Project Foundation

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2012
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Knowledge Base Search
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CHIEF EXECUTIVE FOR FISCAL YEAR

Mr. Robert Kampia

BIO

Rob Kampia is co-founder and executive director of the Marijuana Policy Project, the largest nonprofit organization that's dedicated solely to ending marijuana prohibition in the U.S. Rob grew up in Harleysville, Penn., a suburban town north of Philadelphia. He was valedictorian of his high school graduating class, served three months in prison for growing his own marijuana for personal use at Penn State University, and was elected student body president two years later at that same school. Upon graduating with honors from Penn State in 1993 with a degree in Engineering Science, he moved to Washington, D.C., for the purpose of ending the government?s war on marijuana users. He co-founded MPP in 1995; within several years, MPP established itself as the leading organization on Capitol Hill to call for the repeal of marijuana prohibition.

Rob has testified before legislative committees in California, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Nevada, Ohio, Vermont, Washington state, and the U.S. House of Representatives. He has debated the marijuana issue on national TV dozens of times against then-White House Deputy Drug Czar Andrea Barthwell, then-Congressman Bob Barr (R-Ga.), then-DEA Administrator Asa Hutchinson, former California Attorney General Dan Lungren, and other prohibitionists.

Rob helped author most of the medical marijuana laws that are now on the books in 13 states.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Joseph Pritzker

No Affiliation

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

No

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

No

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?


ORGANIZATIONAL DEMOGRAPHICS

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Gender
Race & Ethnicity
This organization reports that it does not collect this information.
Sexual Orientation

This organization reports that it does not collect this information.

Disability
This organization reports that it does not collect this information.