Youth Development

Richmond Hill

  • Richmond, VA
  • www.richmondhillva.org

Mission Statement

The mission of Richmond Hill is to advance the healing of metropolitan Richmond through hospitality, healing, prayer, racial reconciliation, and spiritual development. Richmond Hill is an ecumenical Christian community and covenant fellowship which maintains a retreat center and place of prayer in the historic Monte Maria monastery on Church Hill in the center of metropolitan Richmond. A residential community of 12-15 persons keeps a daily rhythm of prayer and a common life, based on a common Rule of Life. Richmond Hill's Community and covenant fellowship keep the monastery and its grounds in trust for the citizens of metropolitan Richmond. The gardens, chapel, and library are open to the public every day of the week except Monday before 4 p.m. Retreats and spiritual direction are available for individuals and groups of up to 40 persons. Our covenant fellowship is simply an open-ended group of persons from throughout greater Richmond who covenant to pray for the healing of the metropolitan city. The Richmond Hill Community exists to provide a long-term and prayerful base for communication and mutual ministry among churches and individuals in metropolitan Richmond, crossing racial, economic, jurisdictional and denominational lines. Prayer services and retreats are offered daily throughout the year, and groups who are holding their own retreats join together in prayer for the city before meals. The Richmond Hill Community and fellowship work to support and develop relationships between churches and other groups, businesses, and governmental entities seeking to make metropolitan Richmond a healthy and just community. The relationships formed at Richmond Hill result in a number of projects in community and social ministry, including particularly ministry in public schools.

Main Programs

  1. Spiritual retreats, program, and guidance
  2. Micah Initiative
  3. Armstrong Leadership Program
  4. Summer Camp on the Hill
  5. Metro Richmond Clergy Convocation

ruling year

1986

chief executive for fy 1988

Rev. Benjamin P. Campbell

Self-reported by organization

co-chief executive for fy 2014

The Rev. Janie M. Walker

Self-reported by organization

Keywords

religious community, retreat center, faith community relations, race relations, metropolitan richmond prayer

Self-reported by organization

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EIN

54-1360535

Also Known As

Micah

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Community Coalitions (S21)

Community Coalitions (S21)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Impact statement

Accomplishments: 1. Richmond Hill's Armstrong Leadership Program celebrates its 10th Anniversary - In 2004 Richmond Hill began a partnership with Armstrong High School to create the Armstrong Leadership Program for 36-52 students selected each school year from grades 9-12. The program focuses on helping students achieve leadership excellence in their academic and professional endeavors through personal development, leadership training, mentoring, post-graduate preparation and services projects. 2. RVA Rapid Transit - Richmond Hill's RVA Rapid Transit is a community organization launched in 2013, composed of citizens of Metro Richmond dedicated to bringing efficient, modern mass transit to the greater Richmond region. In September, GRTC received a $24.9 Million federal grant to fund the Broad Street BRT project. 3. The Micah Initiative began its 11th year - The Micah Initiative is a partnership between faith communities and Richmond Public Schools that encourages mentoring, tutoring, and volunteering at the elementary school level through its vibrant network of more than 130 faith communities and 23 schools, so that every child believes, ""I'm valuable."" Goals: 1. Convene first Metro Richmond Clergy Convocation in November. Co-sponsored by Virginia Union School of Theology; will inform metro Richmond clergy about needs of metropolitan city's people, efforts to address them. Clergy will gather across denominational, racial, and jurisdictional lines. 2. Establish Armstrong High School Leadership Program. Sponsored by Richmond Hill the past four years, now moving more deeply into relationship with school. Leadership will be shared by new A-K Pride alumni association, which Richmond Hill has helped to form. 3. Establish new monthly Weekend program of reflective, contemplative retreats for the public and covenant fellowship of Richmond Hill. 4. Strengthen spiritual guidance program by calling full-time residential spiritual director; meeting increasing demand for spiritual guidance from metro Richmond individuals; strengthening peer groups for 50 adjunct spiritual directors; and training 16 new spiritual directors in RUAH School of Spiritual Guidance. 5. Teach Richmond history by offering and publishing lectures on Richmond's Unhealed History; developing Slave Trail programs; and supporting development of National Slavery Museum in Shockoe Bottom.

Programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Self-reported by organization

Program 1

Spiritual retreats, program, and guidance

Richmond Hill is a basic resource for spiritual retreat for individuals and groups, maintained by a Christian residential community of persons who commit to a common rule of life, maintain a rhythm of prayer, and receive very modest stipends. Open to the public six days a week, Monday-Sunday. 40 overnight rooms for groups, five for individual retreatants. Full program of weekend retreats, and schools of spiritual guidance, healing prayer, pastoral care. Individual spiritual guidance and healing prayer available. Library, garden, chapel, novitiate available for prayer, study, and reflection. Prayer daily at 7am, Noon, and 6pm in the Chapel. Eucharist 5:30pm Monday, 7am Wednesday, Taize service 1st Mondays 7:30pm, centering prayer Tuesdays 4:30pm, soaking prayer 4th Mondays 7:30pm, 1st Thursdays 10am. Available for day and overnight retreats by individuals and groups.

Category

Public, Society Benefit, General/Other

Budget

$520,000.00

Population Served

Adults

Program 2

Micah Initiative

Richmond Hill staffs and co-sponsors the Micah Initiative, an association of more than 130 faith communities which work with the elementary schools of Richmond. More than 1400 volunteers provide mentoring, tutoring, classroom assistance, and special projects in cooperation with the principal of 23 schools. A single program director helps to arrange, negotiate and encourage the relationships between the faith communities and the schools. Training is provided by the Virginia Mentoring Partnership and Micah collaborates where possible with Communities in Schools (CIS) to provide a site coordinator/volunteer coordinator. Cost of program director is only $65,000 annually. Support is needed for individual site coordinators with CIS. Micah attempts to contribute from $25,000 - $40,000 in a school to match CIS in site coordinator position, which is proven to double or triple the effectiveness of volunteer and community support.

Category

Youth Development, General/Other

Budget

$60,000.00

Population Served

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Program 3

Armstrong Leadership Program

Richmond Hill sponsors the Armstrong Leadership Program for 36-52 students in grades 9-12 at Armstrong High School, the most heavily stressed high school in metropolitan Richmond. Armstrong serves the children of six public housing projects, with household incomes in the $10,000 - $13,000 range, who are most in danger of social breakdown and leaving school before completion. The program has developed an extensive mentoring network for a larger percentage of the student body. In the past ten years, all of the ALP students have graduated, all have post-secondary placements, and a significant number have attended four-year colleges on scholarships. Travelers' Insurance is a major partner offering funding for the program and job shadowing opportunities for students. The program is funded each school year through grants and donations.

Category

Youth Development, General/Other

Budget

$145,000.00

Population Served

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Program 4

Summer Camp on the Hill

Richmond Hill engages suburban and urban congregations in a ""summer mission project at home."" One or more suburban or out-of-east-end congregation sends a mission team of ten persons to live at Richmond Hill from Monday-Saturday on each of four weeks during July and August. A Church Hill congregation provides a similar ten-person team in residence. The 20 adults work with a director and assistant director, and four college-age interns, to produce a summer camp for 50 children each week. The students are rising third and fourth graders from the elementary schools of Church Hill, most of whom live in public housing. The camps are held at four different churches in Church Hill. The program focuses both on the care of the children and the interaction and learning of the adults. Cash cost is $65,000 annually, yielding a program worth $200,000.

Category

Budget

65000 -- needed for 2011

Population Served

Program 5

Metro Richmond Clergy Convocation

Richmond Hill is a de facto association of clergy and churches throughout Metro Richmond. It maintains a common calendar of prayer, ""Metro Richmond at Prayer,"" in which participating churches pray in concert for the needs of the entire metropolitan community. It sponsors common activities for clergy and churches, and convenes them periodically. It brokers partnership relationships between churches, and between churches and community needs. In the fall of 2010, it is co-sponsoring the Metro Richmond Clergy Convocation with the School of Theology of Virginia Union University, at which public officials will discuss with clergy the most difficult issues they face. An extended network, and specific information on community needs, are under development. Cash to support communications and staff development needed is $85,000.

Category

Budget

$85,000.00

Population Served

Funding Needs

1. Effective recruitment for residential Community membership and staff positions, including currently hospitality, music, and associate pastor. 2. Armstrong Leadership Program: This program supports 32 rising leaders at Armstrong High School, and has also served to bring an increasing number of volunteers, graduates of the high school, and resources into metro Richmond's most highly impacted school. Leadership of the program is passing to community groups, and seed grants have ended, and its effectiveness has steadily grown, but the 2011-2012 year is seriously in need of funding. NEEDED: $75,000 for 2011-2012 fiscal year. 3. Media/public relations: A full-time residential person with skills is needed. Senior resident is $25,000; intern is $15,000. $10,000 in production costs needed as well. Total $35,000. 4. Clergy/church development program: Richmond Hill is a de facto association of clergy and churches, crossing denominational, racial, and jurisdictional lines, in a situation in which there are no effective continuing organizations. The full development of this program with a senior and experienced clergy staff person and media for communications will cost $100,000 a year for three years. It can begin with $35,000 in the first year. 5. Covenant fellowship: Richmond Hill is in the process of building its pledge base and covenant fellowship through development and membership efforts. A new database will be brought on line in the Fall of 2010. The goal for the year is to double the number of annual fund pledges from Richmond Hill's regular supporters.

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Financials

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RICHMOND HILL INCORPORATED
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Richmond Hill

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2013, 2012 and 2011
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Knowledge Base Search
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CHIEF EXECUTIVE FOR FISCAL YEAR

Rev. Benjamin P. Campbell

co-chief executive

The Rev. Janie M. Walker

BIO

Episcopal priest since 1966. Communications officer and Program Director of Episcopal Diocese of Virginia. Executive Director of Richmond Urban Institute and Home Base, Inc. Vicar of two Episcopal churches and Interim Rector of one. Assistant Pastor at St. Paul's, Richmond.

STATEMENT FROM THE CEO

" It is almost impossible to explain to people the importance of a consistent, enduring, constant place of prayer and reflection for the metropolitan city. But Richmond has had such a place since the Sisters of the Visitation of Monte Maria came to Richmond Hill in 1866, right after the War. The city was traumatized. Black people were traumatized - free, but dealing with the horror of what had been the largest slave market on the East Coast of America for more than a generation. And white people were traumatized from the carnage of the Civil War. The city had been burned. The sisters came, started a school, and began to pray for the city. Today that prayer continues in an ecumenical Christian community of men and women. With the prayer commitment, comes relationships, racial relations, conversations and organizations addressing metro Richmond's tremendous unmet needs. Segregation in metro Richmond has been replaced not by integration but by disintegration. Since the integration of the schools, the population has doubled but the area of sprawl has increased 500%. Nonetheless, it is a great community which holds within it not only the central stream of the history of the nation, but also some of the hopes for the nation's future. Each of us needs to take quiet time with the God of our understanding to be the people God needs us to be; and then, in constructive and ad hoc fellowship with others, we can help rebuild the city which God and our ancestors hoped and prayed would be here. It's hard to explain how keeping this community of prayer here in this monastery gives concrete results and makes sense; but it is clear that it does. It is a capital investment in the spiritual and moral life of our metropolitan city, and ultimately in its physical and social success as well. The Rev. Ben Campbell, Pastoral Director "

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Mrs. Cynthia S. Paris

Editor, Op-Ed Page, Richmond Times-Dispatch

Term: June 2013 - June 2016

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

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CEO OVERSIGHT

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ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

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BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


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BOARD PERFORMANCE

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