Youth Development

ADULTS HELPING CHILDREN TODAY-UKRAINE

  • Oconto, WI
  • www.act-ukraine.org

Mission Statement

The mission of Adults Helping Children Today-Ukraine is to respect and nurture the potential of every child by improving the living conditions of Ukraine's underprivileged children by assisting existing organizations to provide for their basic needs.

Main Programs

  1. Hope For Orphans
  2. Father's House International Charity Foundation
  3. Chernigiv Orphanage and Boarding School
  4. International Leadership and Development Center (ILDC)

service areas

International

Self-reported by organization

ruling year

2007

chief executive for fy 2006

Mr. Earl DeCloux

Self-reported by organization

Keywords

Ukraine, Homeless, Orphans, Street Children

Self-reported by organization

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EIN

98-0494328

Physical Address

3488 County S

Little Suamico, WI 54141

Also Known As

ACT-UA

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (O12)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-PF.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Impact statement

Our impact comes through partnerships with and support for Ukrainian organizations supporting the needs of homeless and orphaned children.   

 

Some examples of the organizations we supported in 2011 include:

 

in Chernigiv, UA.   The boarding school serves approximately 300 children at one time. Because of the schools emphasis on quality education over 90% of the children ageing out of this boarding school go on to pursue additional education in universities, technical schools and colleges.  In 2011 ACT-UA provided funding for capital improvements and basic needs. 

. This all volunteer organization in Ukraine provides education and long term mentoring services for Ukrainian orphans age 6 – 18 years old.    The mission of Hope For Orphans is to prevent orphans “ageing out” of the orphanages from returning to the streets of Ukraine and the dangers they face there.  In 2011, ACT-UA provided funding for winter and summer camps, a yearly Christmas program and a food share program in two Ukrainian villages. . ILDC is an international non-governmental organization focused on promoting child welfare best practice in Ukraine through trainings, consultations, publications and services.  In 2011, ACT-UA provided funding for the translation and publication of the book Wounded Children, Healing Homes a valuable resource for foster parents, adoptive parents, trainers and professionals.

 

Other donations included, but are not limited to:           

·         Provided Funds to improve and expand services to juvenile burn victims at the City Clinical Hospital No. 2 Center for Thermal Injuries and Plastic Surgery.

·         Funds for Ophthalmological medical equipment and computer software for the School No. 11 for the visually impaired in Kiev.
 

Goals for 2012 include:

*    Increase the amount of funds available to support worthy Ukrainian organizations devoted to assisting underprivileged children. 

*    Improve upon the success of previous fund raising efforts by maintaining relationships with previous funders and building relationships with potential new funders.

Programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Self-reported by organization

Program 1

Hope For Orphans

In the spirit of our mission, to assist existing organizations devoted to meeting the needs of homeless and orphaned children in Ukraine, ACT-UA is pursuing funding to support Hope For Orphans.  Hope For Orphans is a 13 year old, all volunteer organization whose mission is to give orphans the skills and resources to empower them to become healthy, successful Ukrainian adults.

 

Hope For Orphans is, by Ukrainian standards, an innovative organization and one of the few designed specifically to address the future success of children leaving the orphanages and boarding schools of Ukraine.  Their goal is to prevent orphans from returning to the poverty of the streets of Ukraine.  The organization gained state status in 2008 which means they can officially work in all regions of Ukraine. They currently have representatives in 17 of the 27 regions in Ukraine.  Many of these representatives were orphans themselves.

 

Hope For Orphans target population is children living in the orphanages and boarding schools of Ukraine with a special emphasis on those located in the poorer regions of Ukraine where government support is the weakest.

 

Hope For Orphan's strategy is to use adult volunteers of varying ages, occupations and socioeconomic status to build long term relationships with the children, ranging in age from 6-18 years of age, residing in the orphanages and boarding schools they target.  They accomplish this partially by making day trips throughout the year to each orphanage and boarding school.  While there they provide the children with small gifts of clothes, toys, treats and personal hygiene items.  They also engage the children in educational and developmentally appropriate programming where they learn lessons designed to prepare them for life outside of the orphanage and boarding school.  Most importantly, they show these children there are people concerned about their future social, educational and health needs.

 

Children from these orphanages and boarding schools also attend one or more of the many camps facilitated by Hope For Orphans throughout the year.  These camps are generaly two weeks in duration and serve anywhere from 100-250 children at one time.  The themes of each camp vary.  One camp might be designed to teach an orphan strategies for avoiding those behaviors that prevent their ability to live successfully where another will focus on difficult situations and problem solving skills.  All camps are designed to provide the orphans the skills needed to be productive, healthy and successful members of Ukrainian society.

Category

Youth Development

Budget

$38,000.00

Population Served

Homeless

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Program 2

Father's House International Charity Foundation

Father's House International Charity Foundation (“Father’s House” ICF) began informally in 1996 when Dr. Roman Korniyko began working with the homeless children in Kiev, UA. This work began with Dr. Korniyko using his own home to provide daily spiritual, emotional and physical support for homeless children living on the street. It was difficult for those in Dr. Korniyko's community to understand his attitude towards the homeless; they warned him of the dangers of inviting them into a place where his wife and two young daughters lived and played. Contrary to his friends' predictions, the children responded to Dr. Korniyko’s, generosity by inviting him into their own homes: the cellars, sewers and heating pipes of Kiev. Dr. Korniyko was profoundly troubled by the conditions in which these children lived. He quickly realized that the support he provided was insufficient to fully change their conditions.  He soon was able to gain the support of others and with their help rented a two room apartment where he was able to expand the support to the children.

 

The organization then attempted to register for official status with the Ukrainian government. They were quickly turned down and told there were no homeless children in Ukraine. Despite this difficulty, they proceeded to organize housing for the children within the apartment, despite the conflict with Ukrainian law. Within days, 17 children were housed in bunk beds and 20 more made daily visits to the apartment.

 

On January 4, 1999, “Father’s House” International Charity Foundation was finally registered by the Ukrainian Justice Department with a vision to “save a generation of homeless children, proclaiming Gospel in work and deed.” Their objective is to partner with churches, charity and public organizations and government institutions to solve the problem of child neglect and homelessness.   Dr. Korniyko and his team have continued to house children, first in a nearby house, then part of Ketrivseke’s kindergarten and finally in the organization’s own house where they remain today.  The children residing at "Father's House" ICF benefit from rehabilitation services, educational programming, medical services and recreational activities.  The staff also makes efforts to return the child to their biological parent, find a guardian or facilitate their adoption.  When these are not suitable options the child is placed at the Center of Family Care, also operated by the "Father's House" ICF.

 

The Center of Family Care provides the orphans with the opportunity to live and grow in a family environment. The program consists of 6 family groups who each raise up to 8 children at one time. All families live in the Center of Family Care building. The objective is to provide children with a model of a healthy, Christian family and prepare the children to return to their birth family, be adopted or enter independent living.

 

Families residing at the Center of Family Care are carefully chosen after a rigorous selection process and extensive training period.  A family’s successful completion of the trial period will then lead to the signing of a one year contract with the possibility of extension.

Families are then prepared to take on the duties of a parent/caregiver. All parents/caregivers are required to continue participating in training programs throughout their contract period.

 

In addition to a healthy, loving family environment the children are provided with educational instruction, music lessons, psychological support and heath care services. Financial support for the Center of Family Care is 60% private donations and 40% governmental support for homeless children. Additional information can be found at www.otchiy.dim.org(http://www.otchiy.dim.org/) .

Category

Youth Development

Budget

$20,000.00

Population Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Homeless

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Program 3

Chernigiv Orphanage and Boarding School

ACT-UA is working to improve and enhance the living conditions of the children living at the Chernigiv Children’s Orphanage and their sister boarding school, Chernigiv Secondary Educational Boarding School. Both are located in Chernigiv, Ukraine. 

 

The orphanage opened on September 19, 1997, with the goal to protect homeless and orphaned children. To date the orphanage has served over 2700 children from 3 to 18 years of age. The majority of children arriving at the orphanage are children who have been living on the streets of Ukraine after fleeing homes of several abuse and neglect or have been abandoned by parents who can’t cope with the social and economic challenges of the times. When a child arrives they are first placed at the orphanage where they are provided a medical checkup and treatment for any illness or disease. The staff then works to identify the name and age of the child. They also gather information regarding the reason the child has come to the orphanage and assist the child in obtaining the necessary documentation to attend school. After this is accomplished the child is provided with any necessary psychological services. The last step is to determine if the child can return to his or her home. The orphanage has a history of certification by the Ministry of Family, Youth and Sport as one of the best orphanages in Ukraine.

 

Those children who can’t return home are then placed at the Chernigiv Boarding School. The school serves approximately 300 children at one time.   The boarding school provides the children with complete educational services and follows the national curriculum. This is in contrast to many boarding schools in Ukraine where educational resources minimal. The children at the Chernigiv Boarding School also have access to medical and psychological services.

 

Unfortunately the orphanage and boarding school face severe economical challenges in their effort to care for these children. They struggle daily to meet the basic needs of the children and provide them with education and experiences to nurture their growth and development.   The facility itself dates back to WWII and is badly need of repair. Despite these challenges the Chernigiv Children’s Orphanage and Boarding School have established a reputation as an organization able to keep children off the streets of Ukraine and help them to successfully reintegrate into Ukrainian society.

Category

Housing

Budget

$20,000.00

Population Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Program 4

International Leadership and Development Center (ILDC)

ILDC was formed in 2007 to address Ukraine's urgent need for best practice training in child welfare services and leadershi000 children presently live in orphanages, boarding schools and on the streets of Ukraine.  This is partly due to the belief that children living with at risk families are better off being removed from their homes and parents deserve to be punished for their inability to adequately care for their children.  ILDC operates with a vision that "children will live in families free from abuse and neglect as a result of families being responsive to their children and keeping them safe; communities being supportive of families; and professionals being well equipped to help strengthen families and protect children."

 

ILDC was formed by a team of international experts specifically to offer quality training and consultation to child welfare leadership, management and staff.  This team assisted in developing curriculum and trained over 30 national trainers in Ukraine.  They have since conducted training sessions for government organizations, NGOs, child welfare staff, foster families and adoptive families.  They are slowly changing the face of child welfare services in Ukraine.

 

In addition to trainings and consultations ILDC also administers "Adopt Ukraine."  Adopt Ukraine was formed to change the historically negative view of adoption in Ukraine.  Since 2007 they have facilitated 80 adoptions and have consulted with over 200 people regarding adoption and provided post adoption services. 

 

ILDC is a small organization with a modest, dedicated staff working with a limited budget.  Their work is making ground breaking improvements in the treatment of at risk children and their families.  For additional information on the innovative work of this organization please consider visiting their website at www.ildcua.org(http://www.ildcua.org) .

Category

Human Services

Budget

$20,000.00

Population Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Homeless

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

service areas

International

Self-reported by organization

Funding Needs

ACT-UA's mission is to support existing organizations in Ukraine devoted to assisting homeless children in Ukraine .  At ACT-UA we focus our energies on identifying worthy organizations with a long term view of what it takes to move these children out of poverty and assist them to reintegrate into society.  We work tirelessly to raise funds to support these organizations.  We have relationships with a number of charitable organizations in Ukraine as well as orphanages and boarding schools.  Our assistance to these organizations is directly effected by the amount of funds we are able to raise.  ACT-UA is proud to report that 100% of donations received are used to meet the needs of the homeless and orphaned children in Ukraine.

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Fiscal year: Jun 01-May 31

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

ADULTS HELPING CHILDREN TODAY-UKRAINE

Leadership

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CHIEF EXECUTIVE FOR FISCAL YEAR

Mr. Earl DeCloux

BIO

ACT-UA Chairman, Earl DeCloux, has extensive experience in leading charitable organizations.  In 1993, Mr. DeCloux  was named President of the Leon H. & Clymene M. Bond Foundation, a position he continues in today.  Since its inception the foundation has awarded over $2 million in grants and donations to more than 200 different organizations including many charities serving children, hospitals, schools, and more.   Also in 1993, Mr. DeCloux and his long time friend and mentor, Mr. Leon Bond, founded The Bond Community Center for which Mr. DeCloux served as President.  This charitable organization provided services to underprivileged children and their families in Earl's home town in Wisconsin.  Over time the focus of the organization changed and in 2005 it became Adults Helping Children Today, Inc., ACT-UA's parent organization.  

 

ACT-UA has provided over $200,000 in financial support to organizations addressing the needs of homeless and orphaned children of Ukraine.

STATEMENT FROM THE CEO

"Although Ukraine is one of the largest countries in Eastern Europe it is one of the poorest.   Children often bear the brunt of the poverty.  According to UNICEF, of Ukraine’s 9 million children approximately 65,000 live in state-run children’s institutions such as orphanages and boarding schools. The number of children in these institutions has doubled in the past ten years, despite the fact that the population of Ukraine continues to decline. Government funding provided to these institutions is extremely inadequate.  Children struggle with lack of basic necessities, heat, water and plumbing.  Many of the facilities date back to WWII and are in a serious state ill repair, creating dangerous living conditions for the children.  Institutions located in the poorer regions of Ukraine do not have the funding needed to provide educational services and the children are forced to work in the beet fields.  Of the 65,000 orphans living in these institutions, only 10% were orphaned as a result of the death of their parent(s). The other 90% include children abandoned by parents who could not cope with the tough social and economic conditions.  Another estimated 129,000 children are living on the streets of Ukraine.

Street children struggle day to day to survive. These children beg, look for odd jobs, steal, collect bottles for recycling and dig through dumpsters.  They sleep under roadways, in abandoned houses, underground heating ducts and storage tanks. Most of these children are in terrible health, suffering from skin and infectious diseases. All of these children face other challenges to their health and safety in the form of drugs, alcohol, prostitution, pornography and human trafficking.

The tragic life stories of these children go largely unknown.  Government funding is woefully inadequate and many in Ukraine would rather deny the problem than work together to address the problem.  We at ACT-UA are committed to making a difference in the lives of these children."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Mr. Earl DeCloux

Adults Helping Children Today, Inc., President and the Leon H. and Clymene M. Bond Foundation, President

Term: Mar 2006 -

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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