GOLD2023

New Hampshire Association for the Blind

aka Future In Sight   |   Concord, NH   |  www.futureinsight.org

Mission

Our mission is to advance the independence of persons who are blind and visually impaired.

Ruling year info

1949

President & CEO

Mr. Randy Pierce

Main address

25 Walker Street

Concord, NH 03301 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

02-0223606

NTEE code info

Blind/Visually Impaired Centers, Services (P86)

Eye Diseases, Blindness and Vision Impairments (G41)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Last year, Future In Sight made an impact on the lives of 4,982 who are blind or live with profound sight loss. While we are reaching more people whose quality of life expands with our services that in recent years, there are significantly more who need our help. According to the CDC, there are more than 30,590 residents in New Hampshire with sight loss. The number of residents over 65 years of age is projected to reach nearly half a million by 2030, the need for low vision rehabilitation programming in New Hampshire will only increase. Out of the estimated 30,000 New Hampshire residents living with sight loss, approximately 24,000 of those residents live in areas of the state currently under-served by Future In Sight.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Individual, family and group counseling

Future In Sight's core services include: Individual, family and group counseling to help clients adjust to vision loss; Low Vision Services including clinical evaluation, prescription of aids and appliances, and training in their use; Rehabilitation Teaching to help people learn daily living skills necessary for living with diminished sight; Orientation and Mobility Training to teach safe travel skills in the home, community, workplace and other environments; Assistive Technology, and Braille Services including computer training, Braille Teaching, and demonstration of assistive technology; Educational Services providing Teachers of the Visually Impaired and Orientation and Mobility Specialists who work with school age children in the school and community setting; Volunteer Services; Group Services including  classes such as healthy cooking, diabetes management, crafts, computer training, and Peer Support Counseling groups.

Population(s) Served
People with vision impairments

Instruction is provided by our therapists to those who are partially sighted in the effective use of their remaining vision, including the evaluation and training in the use of low vision aids and assistive technology. Services are provided by occupational therapists, low vision therapists, and eye care professionals.

Population(s) Served
People with vision impairments

Our therapists help teach skills that enable people with vision loss to have productive and rewarding lives at home, in the workplace, or in the community. We focus on areas that enhance independence, such as personal safety, household and financial management, and communication.

Population(s) Served
People with vision impairments

Specialized training in safe travel skills, learning routes, developing use of white cane if needed, training necessary to qualify for guide dog schools.

Population(s) Served
People with vision impairments

The education staff assists children, from birth to 21 years old, who experience vision loss or blindness. Classroom instruction is provided by our teachers of students with visual impairments, whose services may also include independent living skills and assistive technology training. Independent travel skills are taught by our orientation & mobility specialists.

Population(s) Served
People with vision impairments

Occupational therapy focuses on reducing the impact of disability by promoting maximal independence and participation in valued activities. The broad and comprehensive education preparation of occupational therapy practitioners enables them to address the multiple dimensions of disability, including physical, psychological, cognitive, and social, that prevent children and adults from engaging in meaningful daily occupations. Services are determined based on an individualized occupational therapy evaluation which includes a home safety assessment. Treatment interventions are performed in individuals’ homes to ensure the carryover of personal daily activities. The number therapy sessions to achieve functional goals for the client ranges depending on the client centered treatment plans. Services will be provided in the home to help facilitate safety and independence.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

New Hampshire Association for the Blind
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

New Hampshire Association for the Blind

Board of directors
as of 03/03/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. David Hagen

Retired

Term: 2012 - 2022

Charlie Mathews

NBT Bank

Ed Marsh

Consilium Global Business Advisors LLC

Judith Rogato

Educator

Jack Crisp

The Crisp Law Firm

Dr. Dorothy Hitchmoth

Dr. Dorothy L. Hitchmoth, PLLC

Dr. Kristen Bryant

Focused Eye Care

David Kenepp

Retired

Andrew Crook

PlutoTV

Lex Gillette

Intel Corp

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Not applicable
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/3/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/03/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.