PLATINUM2024

CONNECTICUT RIVER WATERSHED COUNCIL INC

Clean water. Healthy habitat. Thriving communities.

aka Connecticut River Conservancy   |   Greenfield, MA   |  www.ctriver.org

Learn how to support this organization

Mission

We are the voice for the Connecticut River watershed, from source to sea. We collaborate with partners across four states to protect and advocate for your rivers and educate and engage communities. We bring people together to prevent pollution, improve habitat, and promote enjoyment of your river and its tributary streams. Healthy rivers support healthy economies.

Notes from the nonprofit

Volunteer for Community Science Field Work. No experience needed. Details: https://www.ctriver.org › get-involved Water Quality Monitoring River Herring Surveys Invasive Water Chestnut Pulls Tree Planting Sea Lamprey Nest Surveys

Ruling year info

1953

Executive Directror

Rebecca Todd

Main address

15 Bank Row

Greenfield, MA 01301 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

04-2148397

NTEE code info

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

This strategic growth plan will implement actions designed to build and steward CRC’s community and donor base that specifically focus on tributary group members, volunteers (including S2S), youth and residential abutters of the Connecticut River. Actions include recommendations for data collection and analysis, defined reportable performance metrics, evaluation and implementation to build upon the programming over the next five years. This growth plan includes the DEI training that Board and staff are undertaking 2021/2022.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Clean Energy Production

To improve the environmental footprint of our energy generating facilities.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Improve and restore aquatic & riparian habitat and connectivity for resident and diadromous species throughout the watershed.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Create and implement ambitious and consistent water quality standards across the four-state watershed.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Celebrate the river and promote a wide variety of opportunities to get outside in urban, rural, and suburban areas of the watershed with events and programs like guided paddles, community science, river clean-ups, guided river cruises, etc.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

Using citizen scientists and Connecticut River Conservancy staff provides the public with clear, reliable, and accessible information about their water that supports meaningful environmental benefits.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Volunteers in Groups go out to clean up trash and debris in all four states of the watershed on one day to better their neighborhoods and communities. Over 2,000 people have collected over 950 tons of trash in 20years running now - the largest river cleanup in New England.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Resolution & commendation for Source to Sea Cleanup 2012

State of Vermont - House of Representatives

Environmental Merit Award 2002

Environmental Protection Agency

Environmental Merit Award 1999

Soil & Water Conservation Service

Take Pride in America 1988

Governor's Award - State of Connecticut

Dedication to Natural Resource Conservation 1985

Massachusetts Department of Fish & Game

River Hero - David Deen 2017

River Network

Cleanup Champion 2017

American Rivers

Resilience Award of Honor 2022

US Green Building Council, CT Chapter

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Acres of natural habitat restored

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Aquatic and Riparian Habitat Restoration

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of trees planted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

Aquatic and Riparian Habitat Restoration

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Source to Sea Cleanup

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of invasive species removed from managed area(s)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Aquatic and Riparian Habitat Restoration

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of water samples collected and tested.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Healthy Waters - One River Initiative

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Engaged citizen scientist volunteers are trained annually to collect over 1000 water samples from over 100 recreation areas informing more than 20,000 fellow river-users of river bacteria levels.

Number of Dams Removed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Aquatic and Riparian Habitat Restoration

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Staff and board share this goal of diversifying and expanding the community of people who are part of CRC. When asked about their vision for the organization’s future, many staff and trustees envision a larger network of younger folks, people of color and people who live in urban areas adjacent to the river. Furthermore, with the rise of the COVID-19 pandemic, inequities that have existed within our watershed for generations, and that have been painfully obvious to poor communities and communities of color, have been highlighted. There is a greater understanding that we are all interdependent, and that we all suffer when some within our community are denied their basic human rights to food, water, shelter, education, clean water and a healthy environment. It’s a unique time and it requires a unique response that responds to the current context. This is both a mission imperative, and a critical component of CRC’s continued financial sustainability. This plan seeks to significantly broaden and diversify CRC over the next 5 years.

Strategic Donor Base Growth Actions

There are many different groups that are compelling targets for CRC’s donor base growth
efforts. The following groups represent the ones we plan to strategically prioritize in the
coming five years.
I. Local Tributary Organizations
II. CRC Volunteers
III. Youth
IV. Abutters
V. River User Groups

CRC’s performance will be evaluated on metrics annually. (See Strategic Growth Plan for details)

This plan was created by CRC staff. We could not be certain about the time commitment but will evaluate as we go.
(See Evaluation of Success)

We have made accomplishments in the Growth Plan with execution of outreach for retention to new members, loyal donors, recurring givers. Steps have been taken to execute plan for volunteers. A DEI program is underway and
attended by staff and board to increase ability to reach a more diverse community of river lovers. We have just made a mailing to abutters.
CRC has expanded the number of opportunities for an initial first gift, including:
• Continuing and expanding the practice of asking for a gift when someone registers for
an event.
• Expanding the option to donate when you make a River Shop purchase.
• Exploring ways to build on year-round engagement and stewardship of Source to Sea
volunteers by incorporating asks at the right times using new tools like text giving, and
targeted and thankful follow up via email, social media, etc.
• Considering asking for a gift at the time that people access high use tools on our site
like the Is it Clean site, the Paddlers’ Trail app, etc.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Financials

CONNECTICUT RIVER WATERSHED COUNCIL INC
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

CONNECTICUT RIVER WATERSHED COUNCIL INC

Board of directors
as of 02/29/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Robert Sproull

Robert Sproull

Retired

Payton Shubrick

6 Bricks

Leslie Harris

Quonquont Farm

Steve Gephard

Retired

Tom Ciardelli

Alison Brinkmann

Damon DePaolo

MassMutual

Tim Lewis

Nicole Pollard

MassMutual

David Deen

Retired

Kari Kastango

Everest Clinical Research

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes