Family Service Association of Greater Boston

aka Family Service of Greater Boston   |   Boston, MA   |  www.fsgb.org
This organization has not appeared on the IRS Business Master File in a number of months. It may have merged with another organization or ceased operations.

Mission

Family Service promotes self-sufficiency and well-being of at-risk families, children and youth through innovative, culturally competent, and integrated health and social services, thereby contributing to healthy communities. Serving principally low-income residents of Boston's urban communities, struggling with emotional, psychological, physical and economic impact of poverty, abuse, violence and parental neglect, we target prevention/harm reduction; pee/family education; social-emotional competency; parenting skill-building; and behavioral health and trauma—to prevent/alleviate factors which could lead to family or community crisis. Our core expertise is disrupting the cycle of inter-generational family disadvantage and advancing clients' potential for life-altering change.

Ruling year info

1953

Principal Officer

Ms. Gisele M. Michel

Main address

31 Heath Street

Boston, MA 02130 USA

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EIN

04-2160528

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Mental Health Treatment (F30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Behavioral Health Programs

Composed of two divisions—Center for Behavioral Health and Family-Based Services—our clinical programs 1) focus on stabilizing at-risk children and youth who have experienced traumatic stress and dysfunction due to family violence, sexual assault, emotional or physical abuse, chronic neglect, traumatic loss, or school and community violence; 2) offer psycho-pharmacology services, as indicated; 3) provide mental health services to children and pre-adolescents enrolled in the Boston Public Schools; 4) provide services such as in-home behavioral therapy and mentoring; parenting skills education, family coping skills development, child behavioral health, and out-of-home placements for children/youth with significant behavioral issues; and 5) counsels parents how to restore children and families to optimal functioning at home, at school, or at work. Clinicians work with clients individually and in families to identify personal strengths, understand available choices, and address challenges.

Population(s) Served

Family Independence/Teen Living Program (TLP) provides group home living for teen mothers (and their children) receiving public assistance and unable to live with their families or the fathers of their children due to abuse, neglect, substance abuse or other extenuating circumstance. They have low educational attainment and few job skills. TLP helps them move toward independence and economic self-sufficiency, graduate high school (or pass the GED), practice good parenting and life management skills, avoid child abuse, and raise healthy, emotionally stable, and school-ready children.

Population(s) Served

Strong Start is a healthy child development program that delivers high-skilled mental health services to inner city early education centers to advance social-emotional and cognitive development for larger numbers of urban Boston's youngest children.A notable feature of Strong Start is its focus on cost-effective inter-agency direct service delivery—i.e., matching Family Service's well-regarded clinical services with the needs of early education centers serving low-income children.In an era of declining public and institutional funding for human services, this collaborative model resonates.Strong Start significantly upgrades centers' capacity to deal with the mental health needs of their children through site-based early education specialists who provide clinical assessments, child therapy, teacher training and consultation in childhood development, and parenting skill building.Our clinicians are out-posted daily at each of the program sites, working with children, their teachers and parents.

Population(s) Served

Helping Fathers Be Fathers is a parenting education and skills development program for urban minority males. Helping Fathers focuses on achieving and sustaining behaviors that reflect responsible male parenting, healthy child development and overall family wellness--and centers on decreasing barriers that harm children's potential (i.e., learning, poverty, social-emotional development, etc.) and promoting stronger families, healthier communities and, importantly, fathers better positioned to contribute to their communities.

Population(s) Served

MIM, currently operating at a Boston public charter school, is specifically targeting social-emotional development of urban minority boys.By out-posting our highly skilled clinicians and teacher-educators onsite at the school, we seek to improve student outcomes by enhancing teachers' capacity to address social-emotional development issues students bring to class and by providing clinical support for students referred for counseling.The overriding goal of MIM is premised on the belief that, by reaching low-income, minority middle school boys as they begin most actively to expand their reach into the external world, there is an opportunity to disrupt the impact of community and family dysfunction that influences their behavior. Engaging their teachers in a fundamental change process creates a multiplier effect that can expand the chances for altering family and community behaviors and expectations.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

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Affiliations & memberships

Alliance for Children and Families - Member 1996

Massachusetts Council of Human Service Providers 1996

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

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Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Founded in 1835 as the Boston Society for the Prevention of Pauperism, Family Service traces its roots to the early charities that introduced ideas and methods which continue to inform modern concepts of community service and philanthropy. The Boston Society pioneered the practice of serving needy families and individuals regardless of their ethnic or religious backgrounds—and developed the notion of "self-help," offering assistance in finding jobs and housing for the poor. Today, we are one of New England’s most highly regarded social welfare agencies, offering a comprehensive range of programs and services committed to improving the lives of 6,000 highly vulnerable children, youth and their families annually. Family Service is a vibrant, agile organization that adapts to increasingly complex human service challenges by embracing change through a dynamically-evolving mission, innovative programming and redeployment of resources to maximize its effectiveness.

The threads of the agency’s vision, mission and strategic goals are interwoven through its broad array of programs—a palette of proven initiatives built on a foundation of substantial research and experience indicating that reduction of harm and risk, prevention of emotional and psychological instability, and early intervention can yield positive outcomes and enhanced life opportunities for children, youth and their families. We are committed to achieving programmatic excellence in three core areas impacting children and youth.

 Family formation is an effort to achieve and sustain healthy mental, physical, and social-emotional development for children through engaged and appropriate parenting.
 Family wellness focuses on building families’ skills in conflict resolution and communication to enhance long-term, positive relationships among parents, children, peers, and community members—an effort that includes the agency’s prevention services.
 Developing family coping skills is essential to understand stressors that can lead to family violence, abuse or destructive behavior and to reduce/eliminate them by developing self-management skills and healthy family practices that address negative behavior.

Our goals are to assure that:

 Children and youth will have safe, nurturing and positive homes and community environments.
 Children and youth will have healthy attachments, supervision, and appropriate expectations in their relationships with parents or other caregivers.
 Children and youth will develop healthy social and emotional competence.
 Children and youth will have healthy coping and resiliency skills.
 Parents and caregivers will have appropriate skills in parenting, family functioning and family communication.

Family Service’s core expertise is the capacity to disrupt the cycle of generational family dysfunction and to realize the positive potential of our clients for life-altering change. Grounded by many years’ experience and enhanced by high retention of skilled professional staff, we have demonstrated a profound commitment to and sustained a deep capacity for:

 Preventing or reducing risk and harm to children and youth through innovative human development programs that are positive alternatives to the community status quo.
 Elevating healthy family functioning through a range of time-tested, “best practice” parenting education programs and targeted behavioral health expert interventions.
 Increasing opportunity and productivity for children, youth and their families by way of academic engagement, responsible family management, and readiness for positive participation in the economic marketplace.

This is the Family Service value proposition, which we achieve through a broad array of strategic, integrated social service programs that combine to offer a “one-stop shop” of counseling, developmental, and clinical services that address the range of life challenges facing the least advantaged residents of Greater Boston. It is a developmentally appropriate, comprehensive continuum of services for children, youth and their families delivered in the community, schools, early childhood education centers, client homes and Family Service offices. These services include child abuse prevention and intervention; behavioral health counseling; child and youth social-emotional competency; peer leadership development; parent skill coaching and mentoring; behavior management; intensive home-/community-based child, adolescent and family therapy; gender-specific programming; connections to community resources; trauma-specific evaluation and treatment; 24/7 residential support; and substance abuse prevention/intervention.

Family Service brings substantial experience and resources for engaging and involving all families as partners and working with families in the context of their community—grounded in our time-tested principles and professional practices. Our services are unified and driven by six basic principles that place the highest priority on utilizing the living environments of children and youth and their family relationships to achieve both immediate and long-term goals of safety, permanency and well-being. We believe:

• Families are partners in the service delivery process.
• Interventions should address family strengths and needs.
• Services must be integrated to meet wide-reaching family needs.
• Successful interventions reflect empirically verified “best practices.”
• Systems of care ideally include natural and neighborhood supports.
• Services must be well managed and outcome-driven.

We have many years of experience working with families and a successful history of involving difficult-to-engage families. Staff are adept in establishing collaborative problem-solving relationships with clients, using "motivational" strategies in engaging family members—e.g., expressing acceptance/affirmation; eliciting and selectively reinforcing clients’ own self-motivational statements regarding change; and affirming their freedom of choice/self-direction. We use this "relational" approach—a subtle balance of directive and client-centered components—during initial client contacts and throughout family meetings.

We seek to create a sense of hope and change within families; empower families to gain control over their circumstances; and help members learn to help themselves by utilizing their own strengths and community resources. Basic to our service delivery is a developmentally appropriate, comprehensive continuum of integrated services for children, youth and their families—child abuse prevention/intervention; mental health counseling; youth social-emotional competency; parenting education; behavior management skills; connections to community resources; trauma-specific evaluation/treatment; and substance abuse prevention/intervention.

The quality/success of our services depend on staff skills, experiences, and cultural competence. We place a high priority on diversity, and staff composition reflects the population we serve. All staff are trained to be culturally sensitive and supervision emphasizes:

• Identifying how culture shapes the way people define problems, seek help, and perceive credible providers and relevant services.
• How cultures define family member roles, expectations and interactions, both inside and outside the home.
• Understanding the importance of analyzing inter-cultural encounters.
• Developing skills/abilities needed for effective cross-cultural assessments/interventions.
• Developing culturally competent treatment plans.
• Using culturally-based community resources to enhance service delivery to culturally diverse populations.

Various in-house and external, university-based program assessment initiatives are currently underway. As results are compiled, they will be posted.

Financials

Family Service Association of Greater Boston
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Family Service Association of Greater Boston

Board of directors
as of 06/22/2016
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Evelyn Moreno

Nixon Peabody LLP

Term: 2013 - 2016

Dennis J. Leonard

No Affiliation

Robert G. Bannish

No Affiliation

Sarah Connolly

No Affiliation

Alexy Boudreau, MD

No Affiliation

Yael Frydman, DMD

No Affiliation

Daren Graves, Ed.D.

No Affiliation

Thomas Hart

No Affiliation

Joann Noble

No Affiliation

Amy Snelling

No Affiliation

Tricia Tilford

No Affiliation

John O'Connor

Community volunteer

Evelyn Moreno

Nixon Peabody LLP

Christopher White

Leerink Swan

Anne Trinque

Grantham, Mayo & van Otterloo

Stacy Cloutier

Choate Hall & Stewart LLP

Deborah Gordon

Network Health