PLATINUM2023

May Institute Inc.

Shaping Futures, Changing Lives

Randolph, MA   |  www.mayinstitute.org

Mission

May Institute proudly serves individuals across the lifespan with autism, developmental disabilities, intellectual disabilities, and neurological disorders to promote independence, choice, dignity and respect. We provide compassionate and caring educational, therapeutic, habilitative, and consulting services grounded in evidence-based practice.

Ruling year info

1957

President and CEO

Dr. Lauren C. Solotar

Main address

41 Pacella Park Drive

Randolph, MA 02368 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

04-2197449

NTEE code info

Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers (P82)

Autism (G84)

Specialized Education Institutions/Schools for Visually or Hearing Impaired, Learning Disabled (B28)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2023, 2022 and 2021.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our greatest goal of our organization is to continually improve the quality of life for the people we serve, and our employees through evidence-based practices, efficient operations, innovation, and data-based decision making. We strive to become the standard of excellence in service delivery in every market we operate.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

1. May Center School for Autism and Developmental Disabilities - Wilmington

The May Center for Child Development in Wilmington is one of four May Institute private special education schools in Massachusetts that serves children and adolescents, ages 3-22, with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and other developmental disabilities. Our full-day, year-round programs provide individualized education and vocational training support.

Population(s) Served

More than 23,000 military dependents have a diagnosis on the autism spectrum, and their condition is made more difficult by the unique circumstances that accompany military life. May Centers for Autism Spectrum Disorders are dedicated to meeting the pressing need for services for children with ASD in military families. The difficulties presented by a diagnosis are often exacerbated when a spouse is away for extended periods of time, when transfers create abrupt changes in daily routines and, most of all, when effective services are not accessible. Through our home-based therapy services we help families develop essential skills that enable them to provide support for their children and to effectively manage complicated lives. We serve all branches of the military — Army, Marines, Navy, Air Force, and Coast Guard — at installations across the country.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

When a child or adult is diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), every member of the family is affected. While each experience is unique, there are common challenges that most individuals and their relatives face throughout their journeys. These include dealing with the diagnosis, choosing the best treatment options, and building a strong and supportive network. The National Autism Center is May Institute’s Center for the Promotion of Evidence-based Practice. It is a nonprofit organization dedicated to disseminating evidence-based information about the treatment of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), promoting best practices, and offering comprehensive and reliable resources for families, practitioners, and communities.
The National Autism Center resides on a campus shared by May Institute’s corporate headquarters, the May Center School for Autism and Developmental Disabilities, the May Center for Evaluation and Treatment, and a Day Habilitation Program for adults with disabilities.

Population(s) Served
Caregivers
Academics

May Institute provides a wide range of community-based services for adults of all ages with autism and other developmental disabilities. These services include over 100 residential group homes and supported living apartments, as well as day programming, vocational training, and supported employment. Dedicated, experienced staff are committed to providing respectful, effective, and supportive services within community settings.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The May Center School provides educational and vocational services to children, ages 2.9-22, with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental disabilities. It is one of May Institute’s four special education schools in Massachusetts for students with autism and other special needs.

Approximately 50 percent of the students who attend the school live in one of our community-based residences. The classrooms typically have 1:2 staff-student ratios, and our highly trained staff utilize the most effective methods of working with children with asd. Classroom activities emphasize all areas of a student's development, including communication, language, social, school-readiness, self-care, and play skills.

For older students, we emphasize transitional skills and strive to help students live more independently. The Todd Fournier Center for Employment Training and Community Inclusion, located on the May Center campus, helps prepare young people to successfully transition from a school environment into the larger, and often more challenging, outside world.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

We offer a wide variety of programs to help children and adolescents reach their highest potential. Through our May Centers for ABA Services, we provide center-based, home-based, and school-based services to children and families in multiple locations. We invite you to browse through this section of our website to learn more about each of these service areas.

Our May Center for Early Intervention in western Massachusetts is funded through the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH) and provides supports to children from birth to age 3. A child may be eligible for services if s/he has a developmental delay. This could mean that he or she is not saying many or any words; not sitting, crawling, or walking when expected; has a diagnosed disability such as Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, or autism; and/or lives in an environment that would put him or her at risk of developing delays.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Children and youth
Academics
People with disabilities
Children and youth
Academics
Caregivers
Families

Where we work

Accreditations

Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) - Adult Day Services - 3 year

Awards

Enduring Programmatic Contributions in Behavior Analysis 2007

Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis

Outstanding Training Program Award 2005

Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies

Peer Provider Award 2011

Massachusetts Council of Human Service Providers

Affiliations & memberships

American Psychological Association 2000

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2022, 2,060 adults and children received intensive, community-based services. Also in that year, 51,998 students benefitted from national public school services.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

There are five strategic goals May Institute is aiming to accomplish within the next five years. They are as follows:

1. Increase our positive impact on the lives of those we serve. We will do this by providing contemporary and evidence-based instructional and clinical services to set a foundation for a lifetime of learning for individuals to achieve their highest level of independence.

2. Become a highly competitive employer of choice for mission driven human service employees. We will do this by creating an inclusive environment where employees feel valued, empowered, and engaged. We will also position May Institute as an excellent training organization for clinicians, teachers, direct support professionals, and managers.

3. Expand service capacity and reach. We will do this by expanding and replicating existing the successful service model, growing services that support or enhance existing service model, and by increasing visibility of our service offerings by improving recognition of the May Institute/National Autism Center brand.

4. Ensure sustainable long-term visibility and growth. We will do this by implementing financial standards for new and existing services, and leveraging existing technology and identify new technology to maximize the effectiveness of the organization. We will also implement continuous process improvement to ensure our administrative departments are operating efficiently and effectively and are exceeding customer service standards.

5. Develop, disseminate, and influence innovative, evidence-informed practices and research for individuals with autism spectrum disorder, brain injury, and other neurobehavioral disorders, across the lifespan. We will do this by prioritizing the growth and dissemination of applied research at May Institute to ensure continued innovation and improvements in service delivery internally and in the field.

To increase the lives of the individuals served, we will provide contemporary and evidence-based instructional and clinical services to set a foundation for a lifetime of learning for individuals to achieve their highest level of independence. To become a competitive employer of choice for mission driven human service employees, we will
create an inclusive environment where employees feel valued, empowered, and engaged. We will also position May Institute as an excellent training organization for clinicians, teachers, direct support professionals, and managers. To expand service capacity and reach, we will do this by expanding and replicating existing the successful service model, growing services that support or enhance existing service model, and by increasing visibility of our service offerings by improving recognition of the May Institute/National Autism Center brand.
To ensure sustainable long-term visibility and growth, we will implement financial standards for new and existing services and leverage existing technology and identify new technology to maximize the effectiveness of the organization. We will also implement continuous process improvement to ensure our administrative departments are operating. To develop, disseminate, and influence innovative, evidence-informed practices and research for individuals with autism spectrum disorder, brain injury, and other neurobehavioral disorders, across the lifespan, we will prioritize the growth and dissemination of applied research at May Institute to ensure continued innovation and improvements in service delivery internally and in the field. efficiently and effectively and are exceeding customer service standards.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

May Institute Inc.
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

May Institute Inc.

Board of directors
as of 09/05/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Neal Todrys

Todson Inc.

Term: 2021 - 2024

Don Ricciato

Director, Boston College School of Education

Mary Lou Maloney

Advocate for Deinstitutionalization and Special Needs

John Murphy

Fidelity Investments (Retired)

Richard Wichmann

Chief Revenue Officer, Cambridge Health Alliance

Jocelyn Frederick

Principal at Tsoi/Kobus & Associates

Nancy Nager

Founder, President & CEO of Specialized Billing Services and Specialized Healthcare Services

Lee Ann Fatalo

Baystate Financial and Special Needs Financial Planner

Joan Goldberg

SVP at Wells Fargo Insurance Services

Kathleen Zortman

President & CEO, AIG Private Client Group

Q. Sophie Yang

State Street Corporation

Peter Farrell

Partner, Cohen Cleary PC

William Rieders

CEO Meteor Learning

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/24/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data