PLATINUM2024

Community Teamwork, Inc.

Building Communities, Changing Lives

aka Community Teamwork or Community Teamwork, Inc. or CTI   |   Lowell, MA   |  https://www.commteam.org/

Learn how to support this organization

Mission

Community Teamwork was established in 1965 as part of President Lyndon B. Johnson’s War on Poverty and the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964. Our mission is: Community Teamwork is a catalyst for social change. We leverage our programs, our partnerships, and our collective voice to foster equity, compassion, and community engagement by creating housing, education, and economic opportunities. Our vision is a community whose institutions, systems, and people support everyone’s opportunity to thrive. A future where clients are aware of opportunities available and how to access them so they achieve their potential for economic independence and personal growth. Through teamwork we want the community to be a committed and knowledgeable partner which results in fewer people living in poverty.

Notes from the nonprofit

Community Teamwork’s efforts to address the individual and community issues of poverty include education, workforce training, housing, economic development, and civic engagement. Community Teamwork, Inc. (CTI) has 57 years of experience leading low-income people toward a path to self-sufficiency. CTI is the second largest Community Action Agency in Massachusetts, and serves more than 58,000 individuals a year. The agency is governed by a 24-member Board of Directors who oversees the Chief Executive Officer and establishes policy. CTI employs over 600 full and part-time employees who are well experienced in serving economically disadvantaged populations. Through the COVID-19 Pandemic (03/20 - 03/22), Community Teamwork managed over $140 million in federal and state emergency funds; with 80% of those funds addressing the housing issues of our residents. Additionally, the Agency expanded into Individual Homelessness programming and significantly grew our Food Insecurity supports.

Ruling year info

1966

Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Karen N. Frederick

Main address

155 Merrimack St.

Lowell, MA 01852 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

04-2382027

NTEE code info

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Every three years, in its capacity as the Community Action Agency, Community Teamwork conducts a Community Needs Assessment (CNA). Through a variety of data collection tools, Community Teamwork gathers information on the causes and conditions of poverty directly from the communities we serve. These drive our Strategic Plan and ensures that our progress is community-informed. The top needs identified in this 2024-2026 CNA are as follows: Individual Level Top Needs 1. Affordable and Available Housing 2. Financial Sustainability (Education and Training; Transportation) 3. Affordable and Available Childcare and After School Care 4. Behavioral Health/Substance Use Services 5. Services to Combat the High Cost of Living, including food and utilities Community Level Top Needs 1.Housing, Lack of Affordable Housing and Housing Stock 2/3. Mental Health and Childcare Based on the CNA, the Strategic Plan is updated to set out Agency Goals and Objectives to address the identified Community Needs.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Teamwork, Inc. (CTI) Programs

CTI, a 501(c)3 non-profit, provides a wide array of programs and services for low-income and community members in need of education, economic support, and stabilization services. As a local Community Action Agency, we serve the City of Lowell and seven surrounding towns; as a Community Development Corporation, and a Regional Housing agency, serving 72 communities throughout Northeastern Massachusetts, including the Gateway Cities of Lowell, Lawrence, Haverhill, Methuen, and Salem.
CTI is organized by three Divisions, as follows: Division of Housing and Homeless Services, including housing, homelessness and youth; the Division of Child and Family Services, with our Head Start, Early Head Start, and school age programming; and the Division of Energy & Community Resources providing Fuel Assistance and Energy Conservation Programs; Senior Volunteer programs; Mill City Mentors & youth corps; WIC program; and the HCEC, offering rental assistance/housing funding and eviction prevention.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Adults
Children and youth

Community Teamwork’s School Age Programs provide a safe and enjoyable place for 5 to 13-year old children to make friends, play games, practice sports, receive educational guidance, and engage in a variety of creative projects. The program provides quality after school care through enrichment activities and academic assistance. It serves as a bridge between the home and school connection. The daily program is planned to meet the needs of the individual as well as the group. Children are encouraged to develop and pursue individual interests while respecting the rights of others. All of the sites are licensed and inspected by the Department of Early Education and Care.

Community Teamwork serves school age children in Lowell, Massachusetts

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Children

Community Teamwork offers four center-based Head Start/Early Head Start early learning programs.
Our Agency also offers the home-based Home Visiting Program for Early Head Start and Head Start where the focus of service delivery is in the home. The Early Learning center-based programs are part of the national Head Start program that promotes school readiness by providing quality education services to children in a nurturing, safe environment and comprehensive community-based services to children and families. Eligible children and families receive services in the areas of education and care (including individualized curriculum in all learning areas), health, child literacy, nutrition, and social-emotional development. These programs are licensed by the Mass. Department of Early Education and Care (EEC) nd accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC).
The program’s overall mission is to support and ensure families stay or become self-sufficient.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Children
Families

Family Childcare: Community Teamwork supports a Family Child Care system, including the primarily women- and minority- owned family child care businesses. Our program connects low income families to child care Providers. We focus closely on matching the family’s unique childcare needs within our network of Child Care Homes. Our network of 106 Family Child Care Provider homes are licensed through the Massachusetts Department of Early Education (EEC). All providers are certified in CPR and First Aid and receive regular visits by a Community Teamwork Family Child Care specialists. All family child care providers have an open door policy.

Population(s) Served
Families
Infants and toddlers
Children
Self-employed people

Youth Services is geared to provide supports for youth and young adults between the ages of 16 and 24 who struggle with housing instability and emotional barriers.
The Mill You: The Mill You is our day center to support young people to access basic needs and supportive services. It provides access to food and Access to Basic Needs and Services. Case Management and Life Skills Groups are also provided, and connection to other services.
Youth Housing Pathways: Youth Services offers a variety of housing pathways to support in stabilization. These Services vary depending on need and eligibility. Some pathways include:
College Engagement Program (in partnership with UMASS and MCC)
Independence Initiative – FYI Vouchers
Transitional Housing and Rapid Rehousing Programming
EOHHS Housing Supports
Crisis Transitional Housing
Youth Family Foundations (YFF): YFF supports pregnant and parenting young people ages 14-24, including case management for Young Families and Emergency Housing.

Population(s) Served
Adolescent parents
Single parents
Adolescents

Community Teamwork’s YouthBuild Lowell (YBL) is a program for young adults between the ages of 16 and 24 who have dropped out of school and are ready to embrace a second chance to receive educational and vocational training to achieve success.

YBL provides education and employment training to prepare youth for careers in construction and culinary arts. We help students identify their career and educational interests, develop an Individualized Employment Plan (IEP), and support them to achieve their goals. All participants have access to the core program components as well as participation in specialized occupational skills training according to their individual interests and capacities.

Primary components of our training for out-of-school youth include:
Education (GED, HiSET), Career Development, Occupational Skills (Construction or Hospitality/Culinary Arts), Leadership Development, Mentoring, Internships, Work Experience, Case Management, Job Placement, and Follow-Up.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth

Emergency Individual & Family Shelter programming, provides outreach, triage, diversion, emergency shelter for both individuals experiencing homelessness and families seeking emergency shelter. These programs offer emergency shelter, case management, re-housing supports, and stabilization programming to those experiencing housing instability due to loss of housing, chronic homelessness, and/or those fleeing domestic violence. The programs assist with finding permanent housing solutions, through a Housing First design, and with many partners in the Greater Lowell, Middlesex and Essex County areas.

Individual Homelessness programming includes a Hotel Shelter and a new Permanent Supportive Housing Site for nineteen residents.
Family Emergency Shelter includes 2 Hotel Sites, 2 congregate shelter sites, 1 consolidated scattered site building, and over ninety other scattered site apartments, with a program designed to serve 124 Families in crisis.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth
Families

The Community Teamwork’s Fair Housing Program promotes fair housing throughout seventy cities and towns in Middlesex and Essex counties. Our comprehensive approach includes raising awareness and understanding about housing discrimination through trainings, outreach, and assistance. Anyone involved in housing is eligible for assistance including tenants, homebuyers, landlords, owners, property managers, and anyone else providing housing related services. All assistance is provided at no cost.

The Fair Housing Program receives and tracks tenant and homebuyer complaints of housing discrimination while offering information and resources, technical assistance, help resolving your issue, and referral to legal services for enforcement.

Fair housing happens when tenants know their rights, housing providers know the law, and community service providers intervene.

Population(s) Served

This Division supports many programs providing assistance to families and individuals. Energy Programs include the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP)-which helps eligible, income qualified households pay the cost of heating their homes; Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP), Appliance Management Program (AMP) and the Heating System Weatherization Repair and Replacement Program (HEARTWAP) providing focused energy audits and appliances.
The Financial Education Center offers a Financial Literacy Academy, Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA), and the Secure Jobs Program, providing employment services, to work with the client to remove barriers to success by linking participants with childcare resources, transportation to and from training programs, helping navigate options for people who have challenges with CORIs, and providing skills training and job search. The Division also houses the Entrepreneurship Center @CTI supporting businesses and the WIC program.

Population(s) Served
Families
Economically disadvantaged people

At Community Teamwork we work with people wherever they are on the continuum of need for housing security, from struggling to meet basic rental and utility expenses to facing homelessness and even to supporting people who are ready to achieve homeownership. We also help build a more robust base of affordable housing units through partnerships with local cities and towns. The Housing Consumer Education Center and Emergency Rental Assistance (HCEC) offers the RAFT Program which helps keep households in stable housing situations when facing eviction, loss of utilities, or other housing emergencies; Housing Provider Services, educate housing providers about our programs, tenant selection, rights/responsibilities; First time Homebuyers Training programs, Tenant Education workshops, and Home Modification Loan Program to help families and individuals modify their homes for improved accessibility to allow those living in the home who are elderly or disabled to continue living independently.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Self-employed people
Unemployed people
Economically disadvantaged people
Self-employed people
Unemployed people

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Massachusetts Association for Community Action (MASSCAP) 1965

Massachusetts Association of Community Development Corporations (MACDC) 1982

United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley 1965

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of households that obtain/retain permanent housing for at least 6 months

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants, Families

Related Program

Emergency Housing Assistance - Division of Housing & Homelessness

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Programs supporting this include Residential Housing, the Housing Consumer Education Center within our Community Resources Division.

Number of families assisted with rent or mortgage to avoid eviction

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Housing Consumer Education Center - Division of Energy and Community Resources

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Primarily through Housing and Consumer Education Center (HCEC),CTI provides Emergency Rental Assistance and Rental Assistance for Families in Transition (RAFT) throughout Essex and Middlesex Counties.

Number of youth who have a positive adult role model

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, Preteens

Related Program

Division of Energy and Community Resources

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Mill City Mentors is a youth mentoring program that plays an important part in the lives of low-income children and youth. The program provides opportunities for caring adults to volunteer their time.

Number of youth who volunteer/participate in community service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Young adults

Related Program

Community Teamwork, Inc. (CTI) Programs

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Community Service occurs through our YouthBuild and Volunteer Services program, specifically our Spindle City Corps - focused on youth.

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed knowledge about occupations

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth

Related Program

YouthBuild of Greater Lowell - Division of Housing & Homelessness (Youth Services)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

YouthBuild is a program for young adults between the ages of 16 to 24 and provides education and occupational skills training. Youth receive occupational and career overviews as part of the program.

Number of clients whose nutrition has improved

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Pregnant people, Economically disadvantaged people, Families, Parents

Related Program

Division of Energy and Community Resources

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

WIC stands for Women, Infants, & Children. It is a free nutrition program for families that provides healthy foods, nutrition education, breastfeeding support, and referrals. 2021 impacted by COVID-19

Number of program participants who receive a secondary school diploma or GED

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth

Related Program

YouthBuild of Greater Lowell - Division of Housing & Homelessness (Youth Services)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

YouthBuild provides education credential alternatives to those youth who were not successful in the traditional high school setting. These are HiSET attainments in our program.

Number of participants who gain employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

YouthBuild of Greater Lowell - Division of Housing & Homelessness (Youth Services)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

These metrics are tied to the CTI YouthBuild program and Secure Jobs programming. Secure Jobs staff works with the client to remove barriers to success by linking participants with resources.

Number of low-income households who have received utilities assistance to keep the lights, heat and/or water on in their homes

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Division of Energy and Community Resources

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Supported through the Division of Energy and Community Resources, CTI manages the LIHEAP program (Low Income Heating and Energy Assistance Program). MA also instituted a utility shut-off Moratorium.

Number of businesses developed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Division of Energy and Community Resources

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The Entrepreneurship Center @CTI guides entrepreneurs through the process of starting, stabilizing and growing small businesses. The Entrepreneurship Center @CTI is an SBA Microlender.

Number of tax returns completed by volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Division of Energy and Community Resources

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program (VITA) provides low-income individuals with free tax preparation to help those who are eligible to obtain the Earned Income Tax Credit.

The number of children (0 to 5) who demonstrated skills for school readiness.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Early Learning: Head Start/Early Head Start - Division of Child & Family Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Early Learning programs: Head Start/ Early Head Start and Family Child Care programming.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The attached Strategic Plan highlights the following goals:
AFFORDABLE HOUSING CREATION
The Strategic Goals to increase affordable housing are focused on housing creation for seniors and individuals, and on addressing the racial equity gap in homeownership. The first goals of the Community Teamwork Strategic Plan are focused on these areas in Housing as follows:
Goal 1: Increase affordable housing units for seniors, individuals, and families;
Goal 2: Narrow the racial equity gap in home ownership; and
Goal 3: Advocate for anti-racist fair housing.

EMPLOMENT AND TRAINING
The Community Teamwork goal is focused on employment and training, as follows:
Goal 4: Increased access to education and training opportunities for clients and staff of Community Teamwork

EMPLOMENT AND STABILIZATION SUPPORTS
The Community Teamwork goal is focused on employment, business creation, and stabilization supports to provide wrap-around services addressing those working families in need of additional programming to help maintain employment, as follows:
Goal 5: Support the increase in small businesses owned by members of the immigrant, newcomer, LGBTQ, BIPOC, and disability communities and the increased use of these businesses by Community Teamwork.
Goal 6: Increase access to supportive services needed to maintain employment and household stability
Goal 7: Increase access to affordable childcare for families unable to access care within the current system(s)
Goal 8: Increase the access, availability, and utilization of behavioral health and counseling services for our clients

DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION
Community Teamwork, as the Community Action Agency for the Greater Lowell region, has its founding rooted not only in the “War on Poverty” but also in the Civil Rights activism of the 1960’s lead by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Critical to our mission is being an agent of “social change,” and as the Agency reviewed its vision and mission for this Strategic Plan, it became clear that “equity” needed to be added, not just as a language change; but as a strategic mission imperative. The Community Teamwork Community Needs Assessment included a section on Racial Equity, and facilitated separate focus groups and surveys to gather the data to inform the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Strategic Plan subcommittee. The Community Teamwork strategic goals focused on diversity and inclusion efforts, internally and externally, as follows:
Goal 9: Increase representation of People of Color in leadership positions at Community Teamwork;
Goal 10: Provide community education in the area of Racial Equity, with specific intention to amplify BIPOC voices and embrace an intersectional lens.
Goal 11: Ensure advocacy efforts are focused on areas aligned with agency Mission and Strategic Plan and appropriately implemented across the agency, focusing both on agency services as well as on equity and opportunity for all members of our community.

Please review attached Strategic Plan Document and our CARSP Update which has detailed goals, objectives, resources, partnerships, and service gaps outlined.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals, To actively fundraise, research and write grants, and partner to assist in program development.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Community Teamwork, Inc.
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Community Teamwork, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 06/04/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Sheila Och

Lowell Community Health Center

Term: 2023 - 2024

Dennis Piendak

Town of Dracut, Massachusetts

Sheila Och

Lowell Community Health Center, Lowell, Massachusetts

Germaine Vigeant-Trudel

Merrimack Valley Housing Partnership

Lynn Roderick

Westford Council on Aging, Westford, MA

Bernadette Wheeler

Community Advocate/ Former Head Start Parent

Dr. Leland Ackerson

University of Massachusetts - Lowell, Public Health

Robert Correnti

BIllerica Housing Authority

Mickey Cockrell

Town of Dracut, Massachusetts/ Catie's Closet, Community Non-Profit

Glenn Goldman

Business Representative/ Banker

Kate Cohen

Towns of Chelmsford and Westford, Massachusetts

Marty Conway

Greater Lowell Central Labor Council

James B. Hogan

Business Representative/ Banker; Washington Savings Bank

Marty Hogan

Centraville Neighborhood Action Group

Rita O'Brien Dee

Town of Tewksbury/ Council on Aging

Atty. Linda Neary

Northeast Legal Aid

Safeena Niazi

Head Start Policy Council Member

Sothea Chiemruom

Cambodian Mutual Assistance Association

Marie P. Sweeney

Town of Tewksbury, Massachusetts

Aleksandra D. Tugbiyele

City of Lowell, Representing City Council Member

Xiomara Tiburcio

Head Start Policy Council

Haley Barrett

Coalition for a Better Acre

Lisa Jamieson

Billerica Housing Authority Tenants

Bopha Boutselis

MA House of Representatives

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/23/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/28/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.