PLATINUM2024

United Way of Massachusetts Bay, Inc.

LIVE UNITED

aka United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley   |   Boston, MA   |  unitedwaymassbay.org

Mission

United Way of Massachusetts Bay's mission is to advance an economically just region where prosperity is shared across race and ethnicity.

Ruling year info

1965

Interim President and CEO

Mr. Daphne Principe-Griffin

Main address

PO Box 51381

Boston, MA 02215-1381 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

United Way of Massachusetts Bay

United Way of Greater Seacoast

EIN

04-2382233

NTEE code info

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

anthropy,Voluntarism & Grantmaking Foundations NEC (Phi)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Today in Massachusetts, there are systemic barriers that prevent individuals and families from forging pathways towards upward mobility, disadvantaging future generations and hindering economic growth.  The wealth gap impacts nearly every aspect of daily life and significantly disadvantages current and future generations to survive and thrive. Massachusetts has the 3rd largest racial wealth gap in US, and income inequality has increased over the past 50 years in the United States, with the top 20% of earners receiving more than half of all U.S. income in 2021.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Early Education and Out of School Time

Early education and out-of-school-time programs provide safe spaces to practice social skills, learn new things, explore interests and build relationships with caring adults. They also give caregivers and families the confidence that their children are in safe, supportive and high-quality learning environments while they continue to work.

We are working to provide caregivers and their children better access to quality early education and out-of-school time programs regardless of race, income or neighborhood. Addressing centuries of systemic exclusion and underfunding starts by supporting community programs and resources designed with families at the center, taking a coordinated approach to meet children's and families' needs competently, compassionately and effectively.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants

Education and career pathways for youth and young adults enable a young person to obtain education credentials, explore career interests and complete training programs to pursue a fulfilling, sustaining career. Investing in these pathways can have a cascading positive impact on the young person, their social networks, our communities and our shared economy.

Equitable access to educational and career pathways for youth and young adults requires systems that prioritize their well-being and holistic needs. Our goal is to ensure that opportunities for education and career advancement are available to all, regardless of race or ethnicity. We are working to create resources, programs and support systems that meet the needs of marginalized youth and young adults and help them in their educational or professional development and well-being.

Population(s) Served
Young adults

Economic inclusion and wealth building are essential to addressing the systemic barriers to financial well-being. Fostering supportive communities that promote family stability, offering opportunities for upward economic mobility and building financial systems that genuinely include and respond to community voice and mobilize resources and public policy for interventions can effectively solve the racial wealth gap.

Economic inclusion and equitable access to wealth building requires financial and employment systems that include and respond to community voice and mobilize resources and public policy for interventions that effectively solve the racial wealth gap. Our approach takes the spectrum of economic experience and barriers of our most vulnerable communities into consideration to create community-driven solutions, amplify diverse voices and provide opportunities for upward economic mobility for all members of our community.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Housing stability is a critical component of economic justice, as it provides individuals and families with a basic necessity and solid foundation for their overall well-being. A secure and stable home provides individuals with a safe space to thrive in their work and education, access healthcare and develop a sense of connection with their community.

Building a just housing society requires a system that produces more affordable housing and provides resources that meet people where they are, interrupt trauma and contribute to well-being. This will involve creating a continuum of housing resources that effectively reduces homelessness to a brief, rare and one-time experience. Our approach to promoting safe housing involves creating a shared understanding of the importance of safe housing, investing in resources that interrupt the cycle of housing instability and advancing public policy.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth

During a crisis, a person’s financial status or ethnicity should not stand in the way of getting the help they deserve and need. We can reduce the devastating impact a crisis can have on an individual’s well-being and financial condition by building resilient systems and infrastructure in marginalized communities and increasing equitable access to crisis response.

When it comes to building an adequate community-centered crisis response, there are five key areas to focus on: prevention, preparedness, response, recovery and mitigation. By focusing our efforts in strengthening these key areas, we can help underserved communities better prepare for, respond to and recover from community crisis.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants
Immigrants and migrants
Adults
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of families in crisis who avoided homelessness.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Safe and Stable Housing

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Dollar increase in emergency savings for families receiving financial coaching.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Economic Inclusion and Wealth Building

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children enrolled in early education and care or receiving support services.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Early Education and Out of School Time

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Youth supported in out-of-school time and college and career pathways programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Pathways for Youth and Young Adults

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

At United Way, we’re committed to advancing the financial well-being of individuals and families, particularly in communities of greatest need in our region.

We believe in the possibility of our communities to be vibrant, abundant, prosperous, healthy and equitable. With communities at the center of everything we do, we unlock avenues of prosperity that uplift those who have been marginalized and address the factors that keep poverty in place – high costs of housing, lack of affordable and high-quality education, and other systemic barriers.

We are working toward a future where:

· Every individual is empowered to meet their financial goals and achieve financial well-being.
· High-quality early education and out of school time programs are available when and where they are needed most
· Youth and young adults, especially those who have been disconnected from school or work, have access to education and career pathways
· Safe and stable housing is abundant, and homelessness is a rare, brief, one-time event
· People have their individual, essential needs met, especially in times of crisis.



To achieve our goals, we are focusing on five critical avenues to financial well-being:

• Improving access to supports that help people increase income, build credit and savings, and reduce debt to ultimately achieve financial wellbeing
• Providing high-quality, affordable early education and out-of-school time programs that allow caregivers to work and gives children and youth opportunities to learn, thrive and explore their interests.
• Engaging youth and young adults, ages 16-24 who are disconnected from school and work, in education and career pathways.
• Building a continuum of housing resources and services for youth, individuals, and families that improve housing stability and make homelessness a rare, brief, one-time event; and
• Helping underserved communities better prepare for, respond to, and recover from community crisis.

To achieve our goals, we will focus on 3 key levers for change:

• Broad Stakeholder Engagement – we will harness the power of the community and stakeholder voice, feedback and engagement on the region’s most pressing priorities, which will inform United Way’s impact strategies, while aligning all of our corporate partners’ assets toward driving our shared impact work.
• Advancing a Movement for Change – put in place strategies to create change leveraging our strengths as an advocacy organization, an influencer of policy and systemic change, and a thought leader that can drive awareness of issues and solutions.
• Nonprofits as Business Partners – continue our focus on identifying and scaling proven programs in our region, supporting existing effective coalitions, advocating for policy change and responding to crises.

Shift in strategy

• Tracking population-level metrics: United Way is tracking population-level metrics to determine progress toward our goals, metrics like the percentage of households with $2,000 in savings, childcare costs as a percent of median household income, young people between ages 16-24 who are not enrolled in school or employed, and the number of people entering and exiting homelessness.
• A deep focus on the communities of most need: 293,700 people in United Way’s footprint have incomes that are less than the federal poverty rate. More than two-thirds of these households live in only 12 communities. United Way is deepening relationships and investments in these 12 communities – Boston (Dorchester, East Boston, Hyde Park, Mattapan, and Roxbury), Cambridge, Chelsea, Haverhill, Lawrence, Lowell, Lynn, Malden, Quincy, Revere, Salem, and Taunton.
• Uplifting the voices of the community: United Way has partnerships with nonprofit agencies, community leaders and the corporate sector. These partnerships have helped drive decades of significant, positive impact. But there is one thing they can’t do. They can’t speak directly for the residents living in the communities where we work. Only those residents can tell us what’s working for them and where the need is still unmet.


No other organization brings together the passion, know-how and resources of thousands of individuals, organizations, businesses and government around a unified vision for economic justice and equitable communities. Our funding strategy is rooted in researching best practices, vetting partner organizations, developing organizations' capacity to deliver the most effective programs, aligning partner organizations to scale the impact that individual organizations can achieve and developing strategies for lasting change.

Strategy
• Invested $38m in the community
• $255,000 awarded to community-based organizations in Community Action Grants
• Engaged 400 individuals in Community Conversations throughout the region
Economic Impact and Wealth Building
• Engaged over 12,000 Boston residents through Boston Builds Credit in financial coaching, workshops and financial check-ups since its inception in 2017.

Early Education and Out of School Time
• Secured $20.5M to Summer Step Up over 3 years, engaging young learners and easing their transition to school in the fall, providing a strong foundation for academic success in the early grades.
• Securing a $1.33 million Federal Earmark for Shared Services, which provides business training and peer support networks for family childcare providers.
• Distribution of $1.4M for Afterschool and Out of School Time programs
• Secured $539k grant for AmeriCorps, providing academic, social, and emotional support to multilingual learners in Lynn, Salem, and Gloucester.

Safe and Stable Housing
• Pay for Success Initiative has served more than 1,000 vulnerable individuals and has demonstrated savings to healthcare costs in the amount of $5,257 per person per year. 84% of individuals experiencing chronic homelessness who receive supportive services and a housing voucher remain housed one year later.
• Massachusetts Alliance for Supportive Housing (MASH) announced nearly $15 million in funding for the expansion of permanent supportive housing for individuals experiencing homelessness across Massachusetts. The MASH Development and Capacity Building Grant Funds will be awarded to 18 organizations – 10 will receive a combined total of $11.75 million for Development projects, while eight will receive a combined total of $1.2 million for Capacity Building projects. The MASH Grant Fund will provide 362 units of permanent supportive housing for our most vulnerable neighbors,
• More than 500 youth between 18 and 24 housed as a result of the Rising to the Challenge partnership with the City of Boston (44% decline in youth homelessness)

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

United Way of Massachusetts Bay, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

United Way of Massachusetts Bay, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 05/30/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Tammi Wortham

Ron Mayorga

UPS

Bill Rosensweig

Brown Brothers Harriman & Co.

Jeffery Bray

Dr. Lorenna Buck

Ariel Alternatives

Ava Callender -Concepcion

Massachusetts Cannabis Control Commission

Elizabeth Cheng

WGBH

Magnolia Contreras

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Mark Cuddy

Fbinsure

Kristina Davis

Deloitte & Touche LLP

Pamela Herbst

Jay A Shuman

Sujata Yadav

Eastern Bank

Rick Dravenstott

P&G Gillette

Robert Fernandez

Breckinridge Capital Advisors

Dan Gilbane

Gilbane Building Company

Patrick Gilligan

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts

Daniel Griggs

Ocean First Bank

Ellen Griggs

Independent Board Director

Kyle Grimes

WCVB Channel 5 Boston

Jeffery Holland

Gregory Janey

Janey Construction Management

Carolyn Jones

Boston Business Journal

Patricia Kraft

Greg Lauze

Northbridge Partners

Deborah Lawrence

Global Commercial Banking

John Madondo

United Healthcare Community Plan of MA

Penni Mclean-Conner

Eversource Energy

Jaimie McNeil

Unite Here Local 26

Dananai Morgan

Boston Museum of Science

Carolyn Murphy

Patrick J Murray

Bristol County Savings Bank

Jackie Palladino

Federal Reserve Bank

Dr. Tara Parker

University of Massachusetts Boston

Thomas Samoluk

John Hancock

Rodney Sinclair

Sinclair Real Estate Group

Jane Steinmetz

Ernst & Young LLP

Jon Swan

Boston Consulting Group

Charles Tillen

Bain & Company Inc.

Patrick Tutwiler

Barr Foundation

Christian J Westra

Ropes & Gray LLP

Tammi Wortham

One Sun Life Executive Park

Bob Giannino

United Way of Massachusetts and Merrimack Valley

Alison Ginsberg

United Way of Massachusetts and Merrimack Valley

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/30/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/02/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.