GOLD2024

Immigrants' Assistance Center

Empowering Immigrants for Citizenship and Workforce Readiness

New Bedford, MA   |  www.ImmigrantsAssistanceCenter.org

Mission

Established in 1971 in New Bedford, MA by members of the Portuguese community, the IAC has been helping immigrants on the path to citizenship overcome language, cultural and economic barriers, and integrate into the American way of life while maintaining their ethnic identity and pride. The IAC is where immigrants turn when first in the US for basic needs like food, shelter, and clothing. As well, the IAC helps immigrants travel the often rocky and complex road to citizenship, and ultimately to secure employment and develop financial self-sufficiency. In doing so, the IAC provides direct and indirect services to immigrants and non-English speaking persons, including referral to any and all existing public and private agencies that will assist them in satisfying any and all needs.

Ruling year info

1974

Executive Director

Helena DaSilva Hughes

Main address

58 Crapo Street

New Bedford, MA 02740 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

04-2530908

NTEE code info

Ethnic/Immigrant Services (P84)

Employment Training (J22)

Immigrants' Rights (R21)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Access to Services

Case Managers provide a broad range of direct and in-direct services in English, Spanish, Portuguese & Cape Verdean Creole to over 12,000 immigrants and non-English speaking individuals in the Greater New Bedford region. The IAC advises clients of their rights under current law and provides guidance to access food, clothing, housing and health care. The IAC has long-standing relationships with a myriad of community service organizations that are brought to bear on behalf of IAC clients, depending upon their unique needs and circumstances. Case Managers can assist to apply for health care, resolve an immigration legal matter, become a citizen, enroll their children in school, translate a document, apply for legal status, apply for food or housing benefits for U.S. born child, understand current immigration law and policy changes, and access ESOL and Workforce Development Training.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
At-risk youth
Immigrants and migrants

We are currently working with New Bedford Public Schools to assist with unaccompanied immigrant youth to fully integrate both into the local schools and the community. We provide assistance with ESOL, cultural acclimatization, access to services, basic needs and mental health counseling and therapy.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
LGBTQ people
At-risk youth

Our current Elder Program currently assists 53 elders from the local community who meet every Tuesday and Thursday here at the IAC. We currently host game days, field trips, educational lectures, and cultural events - as well as coordination with local museums and community resources to do community projects such as an Oral History with the Whaling Museum and the New Bedford Symphony.

Our Case Management for those participating in the program includes an assessment of the clients needs with a referral to the appropriate provider in the language preferred. At this stage we also assess any needs for medical insurance changes and advocate for the clients to ensure their needs are being met. Our staff includes two Certified SHINE Counselors, as well as two Certified Application Counselors to assist with HealthCare Issues and translations.

We have recently added a dedicated Mental Health Counselor who specializes in Elder issues, and is a native Portuguese speaker.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants
Families
Immigrants and migrants
Families
Immigrants and migrants
Families
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims and oppressed people
Seniors

Where we work

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback

Financials

Immigrants' Assistance Center
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Immigrants' Assistance Center

Board of directors
as of 04/17/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Laurie Bullard

Anne Broholm

AHead

Laurie Bullard

Rosemary Neto Hazzard

Neto Insurance

Robyn Branco

YMCA

Derek Mendes

Greater New Bedford Health Center

Jennifer Velarde

Robert Caldas

Gus Araujo

Taylor DeLoach

Antonio Lima

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/17/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/17/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.