PLATINUM2024

Catholic Charities Archdiocese of Boston

Providing Help and Hope to All Those in Need

aka Greater Boston Catholic Charities   |   South Boston, MA   |  www.ccab.org

Mission

We welcome and serve, with compassion and respect, all those in need by providing life’s necessities, education, and advocacy to move families toward self-sufficiency.

Ruling year info

1975

President and CEO

Ms. Kelley J. Tuthill

Main address

275 West Broadway

South Boston, MA 02127 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

04-2534041

NTEE code info

Family Services (P40)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2021.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Catholic Charities of Boston aims to combat poverty and hunger through financial assistance and food support. We provide emergency shelters, transitional housing, and aid to the homeless. Additionally, we assist immigrants and refugees with legal aid and settlement services. Our focus on youth development includes educational programs and mentoring. We support the elderly and disabled with home care and senior centers and provide family support services including counseling and parenting classes. We promote overall health through healthcare services and mental health support. During disasters, we coordinate relief efforts. Moreover, they advocate for social justice and policy changes for marginalized communities, striving for a compassionate and equitable society.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Basic Needs

Catholic Charities helps our most vulnerable neighbors in Eastern Massachusetts with food, shelter and living assistance that brings them from crisis to stability and ultimately, to self- sufficiently. Catholic Charities distributes food assistance through our network of six food pantries, provides emergency housing to 147 individuals in our five shelters and helps prevent homelessness by aiding more than 1300 families each year with rent, mortgage and utility costs.

Population(s) Served

Strong families create strong communities. We deliver an integrated system of programs to help parents and grandparents meet the challenges of an evolving world, and young adults and children thrive. If you need affordable, flexible day care that meets the needs of your child, consider Catholic Charities Boston. Our accredited and licensed centers deliver a research-based curriculum that enhances individual strengths. Our programs support the health, wellness, productivity, leadership development, and education of young people–setting them up for success as adults. Our programs help strengthen families and assist individuals of all ages in adjusting to lifestyle changes. We offer assistance to help individuals obtain information about an adoption that involved them.

Population(s) Served

Upon arriving in Boston, individuals face daunting linguistic, economic, cultural, and legal challenges. We help arrivals integrate into society by offering support and guidance as they adjust to their new surroundings and become active participants in their communities. Refugees from all corners of the world including Burma, Cuba, Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Somalia, and Vietnam land in Boston. We provide the newcomers with a modest apartment furnished with basic necessities and help them acclimate to their new lives. We provide translation services to assist people with limited English language skills in accessing legal, health, educational, and other services. Our skilled interpreters are a crucial link helping recent immigrants get the help they need to thrive. Newcomers need quality legal consultation, referral, and representation to help them navigate complex issues including political asylum, naturalization, and family reunification.

Population(s) Served

Education is one of the most important steps towards gaining self sufficiency and ending the cycle of poverty. Learning English, acquiring foundational knowledge, and accessing training helps people build a better future for themselves and their families. Catholic Charities’ El Centro has provided intensive, results oriented ESOL instruction for low-income immigrants in Boston for over 60 years. The program offers both adult education and an IT Training program. Mastering English can be a challenge if it is not your native language. Classes are free of charge, and the program is open to anyone who wants to learn, without restrictions on residency, immigration status, age, or language proficiency level. Take the next step to achieving your personal or career goals by improving your education and skills in reading, writing, math, science, and social studies. Classes are available for anyone 18 years and older with at least an intermediate level of English proficiency.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Accreditations

National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) - 5 Year Accreditation

Awards

MarCom Award - Gold Winner, Annual Report/Non-Profit 2009

MarCom

Jennifer Mendelsohn, BBJ CFO of the Year 2009

Boston Business Journal

Affiliations & memberships

Catholic Charities USA

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people using homeless shelters per week

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Basic Needs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Number of campers enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Family And Youth Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Total dollars distributed for utilities assistance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Basic Needs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Number of refugees resettled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Refugee And Immigrant Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Number of clients who complete job skills training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Adult Education And Workforce Development

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Basic Needs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

As one of Massachusetts' largest social service organizations, Catholic Charities of Boston serves our most vulnerable neighbors each year, regardless of religion, race, gender, age, disability, or ethnicity. Catholic Charities has five hub locations in Dorchester, Lynn, Brockton, Lowell, and South Boston, with 23 program locations supporting families across Eastern Massachusetts. The Agency's four core services assist clients with Basic Needs, Family & Youth Services, Adult Education & Workforce Development, and Refugee & Immigrant Services. We help our clients move from crisis to stability to self-sufficiency.

At the very core of the CCAB mission is the aim to serve those on the margins, specifically those 1) in communities that have been underserved for generations and 2) recently arrived immigrant and refugees. We address each clients’ immediate needs – food, housing, mental health, childcare, etc. through our basic needs and family & youth services. And then recognizing the inequity that the vast majority of our clients have experienced for generations, we work with them to provide a path of stability – through permanent housing, education or job training, or immigration assistance. Perhaps most importantly, we look at each client as an individual, rather than the sum of the problems that they come to us with.

To increase our capability to meet the growing needs in the communities we serve, in 2021, Catholic Charities engaged in a strategic planning process that led to an organizational restricting and alignment of programs and services into four divisions – Basic Needs; Family and Youth Services; Education and Workforce Development; and Refugee and Immigrant Services. In addition to program divisions, Catholic Charities is organized in local hubs based in Dorchester, South Boston, Lynn (including Gloucester, Danvers and Peabody), and Lowell as well as a location in Brockton. This organization provides a clearer structure for programs and services that helps remove barriers for clients. The organization supports community advisory boards that provide community representation, resource development, referrals, and service coordination and responds to local community and neighborhood needs. The advisory boards allow the agency to engage clients, community members, program partners, and other stakeholders.

Catholic Charities partners local churches of multiple denominations in the region to support food distribution and other basic needs for members of their churches regardless of religious practice or affiliation. Churches are also a source of community volunteers, and they help strengthen the capacity of the agency’s programs and services. Along with churches, Catholic Charities’ volunteer network includes high schools, colleges, community service organizations, and local businesses.

Catholic Charities is committed to both measuring our program outcomes and using this data to improve the quality of the services we offer on a regular basis. Examples of recent performance data, taken from our 2023 Impact Report, includes:

Received BPS early childhood programming funding for 4 Universal PreK classrooms, offering free preschool for Boston residents regardless of income.

 Sunset Point Camp in Hull served over 400 at-risk youth this summer.

Teen Center offered a summer enrichment program in partnership with Boston Public Schools providing educational support for 35 youth.

Both the BHA and OCPC Elder services have renewed the contracts serving elders in Boston and South Shore.

Clinics continue to provide outpatient counseling and psychiatry to children and adults, assisting clients in-person and via tele-health technology.

Served over 1,600 individuals and families with over $625,000 in rent and utility payments. 

Food Security Network served over 42,000 individuals in Lowell, South End, Yawkey and Brockton, providing families with nutritional meals

Starting ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) and high-school equivalency (GED & HiSET) classes this month with around 800 seats.

Selected as a finalist in the CCUSA Innovation Challenge for our new Healthcare Bridge ESOL Program – winners will be awarded $633K over 3 years, selected next week at the Annual Gathering

Received $1M grant from Commonwealth Corporation to expand NA/HHA training program services and make it free for participants – enrolling 156+ participants from 9/23 – 8/24, up from 135 in the previous year and 79 in FY22.

Providing interpreter and translation services, primarily for Haitian Creole speakers, at hotels/shelters serving migrant arrivals

Awarded two State contracts to provide legal services, with focus on applications for work authorization and pro se asylum for families residing in state emergency assistance shelters. Immigration Court Orientation program serving double the number of people at Immigration Court as we enter year two of this expanded program. 

Resettlement continues to provide group intake sessions for 40-50 new Haitian entrants each week

Safe Passages team expanding to serve increasing number of migrant children on MA waitlist of 100+.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Financials

Catholic Charities Archdiocese of Boston
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Catholic Charities Archdiocese of Boston

Board of directors
as of 04/18/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Mark Kerwin

Catholic Charities Boston

Term: 2023 -

Lisa Alberghini

Housing Partnership Network

John Barros

Civitas Builder

Michael R. Brown

Adler Pollock & Sheehan P.C.

Brian Carroll

US Department of Defense

Father John Currie

Dorchester Catholic

Fernando Dangond

Bristol Myers Squibb

Gonzague de Montrichard

The Lynch Foundation

J. Bryan Hehir

Archdiocese of Boston

Richard C. Lord

AIM Industries

Eileen McAnneny

Massachusetts Taxpayers Foundation

Maura T. Murphy

Liberty Mutual Investments

Bishop Mark O’Connell

Archdiocese of Boston

Walter Osterman

Social Mavens

Matthew Wells

Tremont Construction

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Not applicable
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable