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Center for Book Arts Incorporated 1974

The book arts inherently democratize the powerful media of the book by empowering people to harness the format independent from the exclusive industry of commercial publishing.

aka 13-2842726   |   New York, NY   |  http://www.centerforbookarts.org

Mission

Center for Book Arts promotes active explorations of artistic practices related to the book as an art object. Founded in 1974, Center for Book Arts (CBA) is the oldest non profit dedicated to uplifting and furthering the book arts & book art through education, preservation, exhibition, generation, and community building. The book arts and book art inherently democratize the powerful media of the book by empowering people to harness the format independent from the exclusive industry of commercial publishing.

Notes from the nonprofit

Our latest available IRS form 990 and audit are readily available by request onsite during business hours. Copies are also available on Guidestar.

Ruling year info

1975

Executive Director

Ms. Corina Reynolds

Main address

28 West 27th Street, Third Floor

New York, NY 10001 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-2842726

NTEE code info

Visual Arts Organizations (A40)

Arts Education/Schools (A25)

Art Museums (A51)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Educational classes

Each year, Center for Book Arts (CBA) offers over 175 educational workshops, and seminars in traditional and contemporary book making, printing, publishing, and related arts. CBA's workshops are affordable (many are sliding scale), taught by artists and professionals with advanced training in the field, and are designed to accommodate varying levels of skill and experience. The audience for these educational programs includes aspiring and mid-career book artists, students, teachers, librarians, archivists, conservation specialists, book collectors, as well as members of the general public. We aim to reach the broadest audience possible for our workshops through open houses, tours, email blasts, our website, social media, and programs for the general public in order to ensure a culturally enriching educational experience.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Ethnic and racial groups
LGBTQ people
Economically disadvantaged people

Over the last 50 years, Center for Book Arts presented over 300 exhibitions involving more that 1500 artists. 10-12 exhibitions annually explore contemporary culture though the work of diverse voices in the book arts. Each exhibition is on view for 10 weeks during which related public programs are presented and a catalog is released. Artists and curators are provided with honoraria in line with w.a.g.e. standards, support in preparing and executing the show, shipping, and insurance. In addition to this direct support, this program aims to pair a diverse range of early career artists with more established professionals in order to leverage our galleries as a launchpad for under-recognized individuals. Our galleries, located in the center of our manhattan studios, are free to attend, open to the public 6 days a week, and offer a unique connection for visitors between the artistic process and finished artwork that greatly benefits visitors and students.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Center for Book arts provides one-year residencies for 6-8 New York-Based early career artists and free two-week seminars on independent publishing for up to 40 participants. Both offer the resources needed to expand the artist or writer's practice through bookmaking and publishing with the experienced instructors in a supportive environment.

Recent residents have come from backgrounds historically underrepresented in the book arts. Material and financial stipends allow AIRs to take risks by relieving some of the financial burden for working artists in New York. Because of this support, our residencies have a proven track record of increasing diversity in the field. AIRs also receive 24/7 access to our studios, a 1 year unlimited tuition waiver for workshops in book making techniques, and one-on-one support with experienced book art practitioners.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Artists and performers

The Center organizes regular panel talks and lectures with artists, curators, and scholars invited to discuss the art of the book within the context of contemporary art. Each of the four annual Major Exhibition and each Featured Artist Project have related artist or panel talks which promote interaction between the public artists and curators, and consequently support our mission promoting communication between the book art and visual arts communities. In addition, since 2009 the Center has hosted an annual History of Art panel discussion series, with topics ranging from the history of the Vandercook press (2009), libraries (2013), book design (2014) repositioning the (artist) archive (2015), maps (2016), paper (2017), artists' materials (2018) and Women in Publishing (2019). Individual event attendance ranges from 25-45 members of the public, and include a reception, with pay-as-you-wish admission by donation. The Center offers all presenters at its public programs honoraria for speaking and follows W.A.G.E. standards of compensation. (Public Programs are usually tied to specific programs and typically do not have their own budget.)

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Center's Literary Presentations include: 6 Broadside Poetry Readings featuring 12 poets annually featuring 3 readings in spring (Apr-Jun) and 3 in fall (Oct-Dec). The Center's Chapbook program brings distinguished poets from across the country to NYC for a reading of poetry. The Fine Press Publishing Seminar trains 12-18 writers each year to use letterpress to publish independently. Text/Form is a summer reading featuring alumni from the Seminar. Each year the Center offers 4 free Chapbook workshops featuring basic instruction in printing and chapbook making.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Center's Outreach and Engagement Initiative seeks to expand the audience for book arts. Local college classes visit the Center for tours and workshops during the school year as part of their classwork in art, media studies, book history, and related fields. In addition, building upon our student outreach and adult education, the Neighborhood Book Arts Project (NBAP) offers hands-on book-making workshops to underserved youth, elders, and persons with disabilities in upper Manhattan, the Lower East Side, the Bronx, and Queens.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Seniors

The Center's Permanent Collection consists of three parts: Fine Arts Collection of over 3,600 artist books, prints, and objects; Reference Library of approximately 3,500 titles on the practice, theory, and history of book arts; and over 50 linear feet of Archives, containing records of original exhibitions presented at the Center and the history of the Center's programmatic activities. Taken as an organic whole, the Center's collections provide a primary-source historical record of book arts as a creative construction and a framework for critical research into book arts practice. Our freely available online catalogue integrates catalogue records with digital images for the Center's core audience of instructors, visual artists, and residents. The catalogue is available on the internet, through the Center's homepage www.centerforbookarts.org (following the "See" and "Collections" links). The Center provides free research access to its collections during regular hours for artists, residents, instructors, college faculty, as well as graduate students. The overall goal of the online database is to spur public engagement beyond the field of book arts and to broaden the discourse of contemporary art practices and curatorship. In addition to research use, art works in the Permanent Collection regularly appear in our quarterly Spotlight exhibition series (described above), which help create a dialogue with other exhibitions and engage the general public in these materials. Closely linked with these exhibitions are hands-on seminars in which classes of college students from New York City schools can view and discuss book art with staff. We host classes from schools including NYU, School of Visual Arts, Pratt, Parsons, FIT, and Long Island University, among others. With the completion of a new Collection Study & Storage Room as part of a larger renovation in spring 2017 and the purchase of new collection storage furniture, the Center's Permanent Collection has assumed a much more visible position in the center's space, and usage has consequently increased.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of free participants in conferences

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Artists and performers, Adults, Women, LGBTQ people, Men

Related Program

Public Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2023 Center for Book Arts did not host the Contemporary Artist Book Conference due to venue issues.

Total number of free admissions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Academics, Artists and performers, LGBTQ people

Related Program

Exhibition Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

CBA offers free admission to its galleries and public programs.

Total number of awarded residencies

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Artists and performers, Adults

Related Program

Artist Development

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Each year, Center for Book Arts awards residencies to artists wishing to incorporate the book arts into their artistic practice. One year residencies include: cash award, studio access, free tuition

Total number of exhibitions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Exhibition Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

CBA presents a robust program of exhibitions and artist projects that actively explore artistic practices related to the book and are relevant to greater cultural and historical conversations.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Center for Book Arts promotes active explorations of artistic practices related to the book as an art object. Founded in 1974, Center for Book Arts (CBA) is the oldest non profit dedicated to uplifting and furthering the book arts & book art through education, preservation, exhibition, generation, and community building.

The book arts and book art inherently democratize the powerful media of the book by empowering people to harness the format independent from the exclusive industry of commercial publishing.

A major goal of our programs —exhibitions, classes, public programming, literary presentations, opportunities for artists and writers, publications, and collections— both in person and online, is to encourage and nurture the many voices, experiences, and processes that artists bring to the space; cultivating a myriad of practices within the book arts, tying in our varied and collective histories outside of the dominant cannon.

At Center for Book Arts, we are working toward a three step strategy to expand the field. This is constant work that involves our entire community and our collective effort toward growing, learning, and forming a framework for anti-racism, comprehensive accessibility, and cultural equity. This plan will be used to guide internal strategies, rapid responses, community initiatives, fundraising efforts, and programmatic shifts.

CBA will create a forum for our community and the public to communicate anonymously about how our organization is performing and how we can improve.We will work with other Centers for book arts to get a field wide view of the state of diversity through surveys and open listening sessions.

We will focus our efforts toward making the following more available to our community: citing the contributions of book artists who are Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC), scholarships for BIPOC artists and those who need economic support, access to our studios and equipment, application fee-waivers, continued offering of sliding-scale and pay-as-you-wish workshops, payment plans for expensive multi-session classes, free membership for students, and any other needs our community may express.

We will continue to strengthen our relationships with artists, students, and members to increase access and stakeholdership. We aim to cultivate a culture of care and mutual learning, to focus on inter-community making, dialogue, and education, and to make sure artists who utilize our space and resources feel comfortable and supported.

We will develop pipelines for leadership within the organization, in particular, making initiatives to diversify our board and staff, centering those who are active members of the Center's community. We will not do so until there are concrete protocols and systems in place that ensure that our growing community feels secure, valued, and heard as part of the organization’s leadership and strategic decision-making processes.

To provide informed, authentic leadership for cultural equity, Center for Book Arts:

Sees diversity, inclusion, and equity as connected to our mission and critical to ensure the well-being of our staff and the arts communities we serve.
Acknowledges and dismantle any inequities within our policies, systems, programs, and services, and continually update and report organization progress.
Explores potential underlying, unquestioned assumptions that interfere with inclusiveness.
Advocates for and support board-level thinking about how systemic inequities impact our organization’s work, and how best to address that in a way that is consistent with our mission.
Helps to challenge assumptions about what it takes to be a strong leader at our organization, and who is well-positioned to provide leadership.
Practices and encourage transparent communication in all interactions.
Commits time and resources to expand more diverse leadership within our board, staff, committee, and advisory bodies.
Leads with respect and tolerance. We expect all employees and board members to embrace this notion and to express it in workplace interactions and through everyday practices.

Center for Book Arts maintains and open dialogue among its staff, Board, donors and members, instructors, exhibited artists, residents and program participants seeking to embrace our challenges, accomplishments and history while simultaneously striving to improve and better our ability to reflect and serve our community.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Center for Book Arts Incorporated 1974
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Center for Book Arts Incorporated 1974

Board of directors
as of 07/12/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. Stephen Bury

Tom Freudenheim

retired museum professional, Smithsonian Institution

Miriam Schaer

Professor, Columbia College, Chicago

Asher Schlusselberg

Associate, Plymouth Group, Investment Firm

Neal Grenley

Retired Partner, White & Case LLP

Gail Coleman

Retired Managing Director and CFO, J Fitzgibbons LLC

Sheila Brathwaite

Director, Diversity Content for Enterprise Marketing, S&P Global

Maria Fredericks

Sherman Fairchild Head of Conservation Thaw Conservation Center, The Morgan Library & Museum

Milan Hughston

Museum & Information Specialist, Retired

Jesse Erickson

Astor Curator of Printed Books & Bindings The Morgan Library & Museum

Sierra Stanczyck

Intelligence Operations Lead PWC Global Threat Intelligence

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/12/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/23/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.