PLATINUM2023

Hope's Door, Inc.

Home: It’s where you should feel safe and protected. Hope’s Door: It’s who you call if you’re not.

Hawthorne, NY   |  www.hopesdoorny.org

Mission

Hope's Door seeks to end domestic violence and to empower victims to achieve safety, independence, and healing from the trauma of abuse.

Ruling year info

1981

Executive Director

Ms. CARLLA HORTON

Main address

POB 262 HOPE'S DOOR

Hawthorne, NY 10532 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Northern Westchester Shelter

EIN

13-3023259

NTEE code info

Family Violence Shelters and Services (P43)

Victims' Services (P62)

Civil Rights, Advocacy for Specific Groups (R20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Every hour of every day, victims of domestic violence are emotionally, sexually and physically battered. We have made strides in victim services so much more needs to be done. Consider the following:
• Nearly 1 in 4 women in the U. S. reports violence by a current or former spouse or boyfriend at some point in her life. (CDS, 2008)
• Women are 84% of spouse abuse victims and 86% of victims abused by other intimate partners. (USDOJ, 2008)
• Women experience two million injuries from intimate partner violence each year. (CDC, 2008)
• On average more than 3 women a day are murdered by their husbands or boyfriends in the United States. (USDOJ, 2007)
• Of 57 domestic homicides in New York State between 1990 and 1997, 75% of the victims had ended the relationship or stated an intention to end it at the time of their death. (NYSOPDV, 1997)
• The cost of intimate partner violence exceeds $5.8 billion each year, $4.1 billion of which is for direct medical and mental health services. (CDC,

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Emergency Shelter Program for Domestic Violence Victims

It takes tremendous courage for a battered woman or man to walk away from her home and into our shelter. Often they leave behind not only their abuser but also their family, friends, neighbors, job, and other sources of love and support. Imagine just for a moment your life without these or similar comforts. It’s almost unimaginable – perhaps equally as painful as the abuse and violence left behind.
That said, according to national research, shelters are the number one defense against domestic violence fatalities. Additionally, going into shelter significantly reduces the risk of moderate and severe re-assaults. (Jacquelyn Campbell, PhD, Johns Hopkins University, 2008).
At our shelter, we offer a safe haven for persons fleeing domestic violence. We strive to create a welcoming environment where the residents can experience peace of mind and a sense of safety while they begin to heal from the trauma of abuse.
While residing in our shelter, adult residents, and their children if any, are provided support 24 hours a day. Safety planning and risk assessment form the bedrock for all other services. The residents are encouraged to participate in counseling and to help each other learn and heal through our support groups. Counselors advocate for victims and teach self-advocacy skills. We accompany victims to court, assist with OVS compensation claims, and link residents to needed services both at Hope’s Door and within the community. This includes civil legal assistance, criminal justice advocacy, health and wellness care, Section 8, transitional housing, affordable housing, public assistance, and educational/vocational programs. We provide funds for transportation, prescriptions, eyeglasses and childcare, among other services. Very importantly, we stress the importance of economic empowerment and the services available through our Next Step program.
Our over-arching objective is to provide the safety, support and encouragement that allow each woman the opportunity to reclaim the power and control in her life so she can provide a violence-free home for herself and her children.
Note: While women and children are the predominant population in our shelter, our shelter is open to all without regard to gender, sexual orientation, gender identity and/or age of male children. Our shelter has been a safe haven for adult male, gay, lesbian, and transgender victims of abuse.

Population(s) Served
Adults

At Hope’s Door, individual counseling and support group services are survivor-centered and empowerment-based. We are a safe place where survivors can break the silence about abuse, begin to heal, and learn:
• Safety strategies and techniques.
• Dynamics of power and control and victimization.
• The warning signs of abuse.
• Legal rights and options.
• Self-advocacy skills.
• Community and governmental resources.
• The difference between a relationship dominated by power and control and one based on equality, respect and trust.
Safety planning and risk assessment form the bedrock for all other services. We help survivors assess their level of danger and educate them in safety strategies — whether the survivor decides to leave or to stay in the relationship. We help tailor a safety plan with each survivor and, as approved by the survivor, we help coordinate the safety plan with the employer, children, family, school, friends, faith organizations, the criminal justice system and other relevant persons and/or organizations.
Counselors advocate for victims and teach self-advocacy skills. We accompany victims to court, assist with OVS compensation claims, and link residents to needed services both at Hope’s Door and within the community. This includes civil legal assistance, criminal justice advocacy, health and wellness care, Section 8, transitional housing, affordable housing, public assistance, and educational/vocational programs. Very importantly, we stress the importance of economic empowerment and the services available through our Next Step program.
If authorized, we are ready to advocate with a wide range of systems, including federal, state, and local law enforcement; Child Protective Service workers; attorneys; caseworkers at the Department of Social Services; the NYS Office of Victim Services; medical and mental health providers; job development programs; employers; landlords; banks; creditors; faith communities; insurance providers; workers compensation; educational providers; scholarship programs; entrepreneurial programs; the IRS; and public assistance, among others.
Most importantly, the survivors learn that they are not alone. We strive to help survivors evaluate the pros and cons of the decisions they need to make, and understand the impact the abuse may have had on their children. Our counselors do not tell survivors what we think they should do. We help them evaluate and prudently plan within a respectful space where they feel believed, validated and supported. We encourage them to reflect on themselves and their current and past situations. Victims are empowered to identify and articulate their personal goals, and to prudently plan for an independent future free of abuse.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Hope’s Door hotline is the gateway to all of our services. We encourage members of the community to call and speak up for themselves or for someone who can’t. We understand that it takes tremendous courage for victims of abuse to break the silence and call for help, as they are often overwhelmed with intense feelings of fear, guilt, and misplaced shame. Our hotline is staffed 24/7 and we ask our hotline workers to answer each call as if it is the victim’s one and only chance to reach help. Our hotline responders are multi-lingual and multi-cultural. We can provide services in English, Spanish, Italian, Urdu, Hindi, and Punjabi. When a particular language is needed and not readily available, we reach out to partner agencies, use Language Line and/or retain the services of cultural specialists to help us overcome any linguistic or cultural barriers to safety.
Our skilled hotline workers listen, help assess the caller’s safety, and provide information about domestic violence, their legal options, and the services available – both shelter and community based. All of this is done with the goal of helping the victims to begin to reclaim the power in their own lives and to make decisions for themselves.

If you need help with intimate partner violence, call our 24/7 hotline at 888-438-8700. You are not alone.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Love Shouldn’t Hurt is an awareness, intervention, and prevention initiative that addresses the serious issue of abuse in dating relationships. Its purpose is to empower young people with the skills to distinguish between relationships based on power and control and those based on equality, respect and trust. Young people also learn strategies to help themselves and their peers confronting abuse.
There are three components to Love Shouldn’t Hurt:
Workshops: We conduct interactive workshops in middle schools, high schools, colleges and community-based sites. Young people are empowered with potentially life-saving information on abuse, engage in role playing scenarios that distinguish between abusive and healthy relationships, learn about community resources, and receive hotline cards and other resource information that encourages them to call if they or a friend need help with abuse. Each workshop culminates with an invitation to join the STAR peer leadership program and to promote relationships based on equality, respect and trust.
STAR Peer Leadership Program: Young people that accept our challenge to join STAR (Students Terminating Abusive Relationships) come together in their schools and communities to design and implement awareness events that promote healthy relationships based on equality, respect, and trust.

STAR chapters have operated out of the following locations:
1) Alexander Hamilton Middle School/High School (Elmsford)
2) Children’s Village (Dobbs Ferry)
3) Hendrick Hudson High School (Montrose)
4) Hope’s Door (Pleasantville)
5) Maria Regina High School (Hartsdale)
6) Ossining High School (Ossining)
7) Scarsdale High School (Scarsdale)
8) The Ursuline School (New Rochelle)
9) Walter Panas High School (Cortlandt Manor)
10) Westlake High School (Mount Pleasant)
11) White Plains High School ( White Plains)
12) Yorktown High School (Yorktown)
13) Albert Leonard Middle School (New Rochelle)

Teen Symposium: At our annual symposium, students learn about dating violence and healthy relationships, engage in a dialogue about the issue, and are challenged to make a difference by joining our STAR peer leadership program. We also offer separate workshops for educators and counseling professionals.

We believe that Love Shouldn’t Hurt and the STAR peer leadership component are among the most important initiatives that our agency has ever undertaken to break the cycle of violence. We are not only making a difference in the lives of young people affected by dating abuse today, but also, and perhaps more importantly, we believe that STAR peer leaders are learning positive lessons that will foster the development of socially committed adults possessing faith in their own abilities to effect long-term social change and to achieve greater social equality that is not constrained by race, class, color, faith, sexual orientation or gender.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

The Next Step program, which launched in January 2014, fosters the economic empowerment and self-sufficiency of survivors of domestic violence by guiding them in identifying their unique barriers to safety and independence and implementing strategies (both short-term and long-term) to overcome those barriers.
Each survivor receives intensive case management support from an Empowerment Coordinator. This coordinator, assisted by the culturally adept, multi-lingual staff at Hope’s Door guides survivors to:
1. Identify their barriers to safety and independence.
2. Envision their personal empowerment.
3. Implement plans to overcome their barriers to achieve economic empowerment.
A key strategy for the Next Step program is the "Next Step Fund.” Survivors may request funds as cash grants, reimbursements, or interest-free loans for expenses associated with educational and vocational programs (including travel and childcare).

Population(s) Served

Every child has the right to grow up in a safe and loving home. Sadly, that is not the reality for 15.5 million U.S. children who live in families in which partner violence occurred at least once in the past year, and seven million children who live in fami-lies in which severe partner violence occurred (McDonald et al, 2006). This devastating social problem has a profound im-pact on children. While home should be a safe place, for too many children home is a place of conflict and fear leading to long-term negative impacts. Sometimes children are embroiled in the violence and suffer physical harm. For most, the abuse leaves lasting emotional scars.
These children often internalize their trauma, which results in delayed physical and cognitive development, and/or they ex-hibit behavior that thwarts their ability to succeed in life. Repeatedly, the children we serve express aggression at home and in school, exhibit low self-esteem, suffer from depression, throw tantrums, blame themselves for the abuse and suffer guilt for their failure to protect the abused parent. At best, the child suffers a deficiency of socialization, developmental, intellec-tual and/or emotional skills. At worst, the child also perpetuates the cycle of violence.
Our goal as we work with children wounded by abuse is to ameliorate the effects of domestic violence on the child while supporting non-abusive parents as they strive to ensure their child’s safety, emotional well-being, and educational readi-ness.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Working together, Hope’s Door, police departments and other partners are working on a multi-disciplinary team approach designed to reduce the risk of domestic violence homicide. We identify and respond to cases that pose the highest risk to victims of intimate partner violence from 19 jurisdictions across the County.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Community Advocate of the Year 2008

Avon Foundation

Woman of the Year for Executive Director CarlLa Horton 2005

Zonta Club of Westchester

Program of the Year 2001

Women's Equality Day Committee

Zowie Award 2008

Zonta Club of New Rochelle

Leadership Group of Most Interest 2008

Youth Action Convention

Affiliations & memberships

National Network to End Domestic Violence 2010

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of training workshops

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Related Program

Love Shouldn't Hurt Teen Dating Abuse Awareness and Prevention

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Hope's Door has two primary aims. We work to end domestic violence and to support victims in their efforts to empower themselves to achieve safety, independence, and healing from the trauma of abuse.
We work on primary prevention, which includes broad-based community messaging to change the social norms that allow abuse to flourish. We work with young people with the goal of breaking the intergenerational cycle of abuse. We want to eradicate relationships based on power and control and foster relationships based on equality, respect and trust.

Hope's Door has a two-part mission: 1) to end domestic violence and 2) to empower victims to achieve safety, independence, and healing from the trauma of abuse.
Our role is to show victims that they are not alone and help them believe in themselves and have hope – hope that safety can be realized, hope that their seen and unseen wounds will heal, and hope that they can forge a better life for themselves and their children while taking their personal journey from victim to survivor to thriver.
Domestic abuse survivors need to be able to break the silence about the abuse in their lives, reach out for help, comprehend that they are not alone, secure available information and resources, empower themselves with information about abuse, identify and understand the abuse and danger they face, empower themselves with safety-enhancing strategies, participate in counseling and support groups that foster healing from the trauma of abuse, receive emergency financial assistance, move forward strategically to gain economic independence to avoid returning to abusers, receive guidance and support to navigate the criminal justice and court systems, and secure legal representation to achieve their civil legal goals. If victims have needs resulting from unique vulnerabilities (e.g., immigration status, Limited English Proficiency, disability, LGBTQ), they need culturally competent staff to overcome their unique barriers to safety, independence and healing. If they are in danger, they need a safe haven in our residential shelter, and if the shelter is full or not appropriate, they need help in securing alternate safe arrangements, including the option for safety in a hotel.
Ending domestic violence requires a multi-pronged approach. We harness the power of survivors, the passion of advocates and the inclusion of all stakeholders in society. We work to change laws and we work to change minds. We understand that it is the imbalance of power related to gender roles in our society and the resulting economic dependence of women, especially those with children, that allows abuse to flourish. We work to change that. We see men and boys as integral to our work and invite them to join us in ending interpersonal and family violence. Most importantly, we encourage the empowered participation of survivors in our work.

Hope's Door has provided shelter, safety and support for victims of domestic violence for 38 years, and we have the board governance, organizational infrastructure, management staff and victim services staff to fully support our work. Our victim services team is comprised of multi-cultural and multi-lingual staff members with a depth and range of educational backgrounds and experiences who are dedicated to creating safe spaces where the voices of individuals impacted by violence can be heard and supported.
Hope's Door is an organization of long standing with a commendable reputation among diverse stakeholders and an experienced, stable executive and senior management team. Specifically:
• Executive Director CarlLa Horton has led the organization for the past 21 years of her 30-year career.
• CFO Phil Morton has served Hope's Door for 8 years of his 31-year financial career.
• Director of Development and Community Relations Barbara Turk brought 15+ years of experience when she joined Hope's Door in February of 2019.
• Director of Administration Dianne DeFilippis started her career at Hope's Door 16 years ago, progressing from direct victim service delivery to her current position on the Senior Management Team.
• Chief Program Officer Janmarie Brown brought 10+ years of experience in residential management and outpatient counseling services, program development, advocacy, and general management when she joined Hope's Door in 2020.
• Chief of Legal Services and HR Stacey Neumann brought 15+ years of experience in Intimate Partner abuse legal cases when she joined Hope's Door.

We have provided crisis intervention, shelter, and support services.
We have expanded service delivery to include legal services, including orders of protection, child custody cases, UVISAs, and divorce proceedings to meet the legal needs of our clients.
We have achieved a high degree, over 95%, of client satisfaction about our services.
We have begun to change the minds of diverse people and systems about domestic violence.
We have significantly reduced the number of deaths with our Domestic Violence High Risk Team and services.
We have not ended domestic violence.
We have not stopped victim-blaming.
There is still much work to do.

Our current goals include:
Expand our prevention program to college level youth.
Continue to expand services and safety planning strategies for high-risk victims.
Advocate for removal of firearms from all abusers.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Due to victim safety concerns we are hesitant to reach out to shelter residents after they leave

Financials

Hope's Door, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Hope's Door, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 01/20/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Julia Peloso-Barnes

Prism Planning and Solutions Group

Term: 2023 - 2022

Pamela Ashford

Westchester County District Attorney's Office, DV Aide/ Advocate

Julia Peloso-Barnes

Morgan Stanley

Martha Obler Kohn

Community Volunteer

Elizabeth Galani Zimmerman

Westchester NOW

Silvana Bajana

Contreras Translation & Interpretation Services, Spanish/ French translator & Interpreter

Laura Holdgrafer

Bunge

Dan Lipka

Making Headway Foundation

Melissa Szot

PKF O'Connor Davies

Blakely Brodbeck

Community Volunteer

Shreya Gopal

Pricewaterhouse Coopers

Ingrid Kessler

Quartet Health

Yael Levy

Apollo Global Management

Marisol Sanchez

Self-employed

Michele Goldmeer

Retired

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/30/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/29/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.