Religions for Peace USA

Different Faiths, Common Action

aka RFPUSA   |   New York, NY   |  www.rfpusa.org

Mission

Religions for Peace - USA gathers representatives of religious communities in the U.S.; promotes multi-religious cooperation for peace and justice; builds on the spiritual, human, and institutional resources of its communities; enhances mutual understanding; and acts for the common good.

Ruling year info

2001

Executive Director

Dr. Tarunjit Singh Butalia

Main address

777 United Nations Plaza Floor 9

New York, NY 10017 USA

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Formerly known as

United States Conference of Religions for Peace

EIN

13-4160243

NTEE code info

Interfaith Issues (X90)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Our Muslim Neighbor Initiative

Combating Islamaphobia

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. To mobilize and resource religious communities and their leaders as well as people of faith and goodwill in fostering multi-religious cooperation and social cohesion.
2. Respond to and reduce religiously-motivated conflict in the US.
3. Advocating for the responsibility of the USA as a citizen of the global community
4. Enhance the capacity of RFPUSA to accomplish the first three goals through organizational capacity building.

Religions for Peace USA aims to accomplish its goals and to fulfill its mission and vision by engaging in various strategies and tactics in order to mobilize, education and equip its religious communities and the interfaith community more broadly.

Some examples of traditional paths:
Traditional Paths

1. Formal Discussions
2. Commentary (Organizational or Coordinated Interfaith Statements)
3. Connections between Interfaith Councils and Member Communities
4. Networks (National and Regional)
5. Dialogues (Bi-lateral or multi-lateral)

Some Examples of New Paths
1. Rapid Response Engagements
2. Branded Newsletter and Digital Magazine
3. Interfaith Webinars and Other Educational Fora
4. Social Media Community
5. Toolkits and Guides
6. Religious Leaders Advisory Council

Religions for Peace USA is the largest and most broadly-based representative multi-religious forum in the United States, with participants from more than 50 religious communities, representing each of the major faith traditions. Most of the communities affiliated with RFPUSA have national constituencies, which affords our organization the ability and potential to carry out programs in every locality. Moreover, RFPUSA is part of an extensive global network of Religions for Peace which has nearly 100 affiliates globally, including in some of the most challenging places in the world.

The governance of the organization is carried out by three bodies: the Council of Presidents, the Executive Council, and the Advisory Council, whose membership encompasses senior U.S. religious leadership, interreligious affairs officers and advocates, scholars, and issue based experts. Together these councils represent over sixty religious communities, making RFPUSA the most broadly based religiously representative organization in the country.

On a day-to-day basis, operations are handled by Executive Director Aaron Stauffer and Program Administrator Itang Young, as well as by a small staff of diverse young professionals, interns, seminary field education placements, recent college graduates and volunteers.

Our progress under our current Strategic Plan has seen the development, facilitation and implementation of the following programs:

1. The Interfaith Academies for Religious Leaders – With generous support from the Luce Foundation, involves working in consortium with seminaries and institutions of higher education for religious vocations to enable an immersion retreat in several faith traditions and interreligious community building, so as to prepare religious leaders for a pluralistic world.

2. National Gathering of Religious Leaders – Conducted on an occasional basis, Religions for Peace USA sponsors a collaboration retreat for the leadership of U.S. religious and interfaith organizations to foster coordination.

3. Return to the Earth – Returning to the Earth the remains of over 100,000 culturally unidentifiable Native Americans in cooperation with a consortium of agencies, both religious and secular, Native and non-Native. Our principal task is to galvanize support, but we are also working on the distribution of a study guide, development of a video, and interpretation of the project and reconciliation processes.

4. The 9/11 Unity Walk – Striving to involve members of mutual religious communities in the building up of understanding and cooperation near the commemoration of the anniversary of 9/11.

5. Our Muslim Neighbor – Fostering a public education and engagement program on views of Muslims and Islam in collaboration with the Tanenbaum Center for Interreligious Understanding, Auburn Seminary, and the Islamic Networks Group.

6. Education and Advocacy for Addressing Climate Change – Providing education and advocacy for addressing climate change with local religious and interreligious actors through introduction of a toolkit, educational webinars, and a program of advocacy.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Religions for Peace USA
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Religions for Peace USA

Board of directors
as of 05/10/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Imam Naeem Baig

Islamic Council of North America (ICNA)

Fadhel al-Sahlani

Imam Al-Khoei Benevolent Foundation

Zainab al-Suwaij

American Islamic Congress

Nathanael Symeonides

Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America

Vicken Aykazian

Armenian Church

Naeem Baig

ICNA Council for Social Justice

Anju Bhargava

Hindu American Seva Charities

Jessica Campbell

United Methodist Church

Vineet Chander

International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON)

Eric Cherry

Unitarian Universalist Association

Chueh Chuan

Buddha's Light International Association

Anthony Cirelli

United States Conference of Catholic Bishops

John Crossin

United States Conference of Catholic Bishops

Anuttama Dasa

International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON)

Dennis Frado

Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

Homi Gandhi

Federation of Zoroastrian Associations of North America

Qalvy Grainzvolt

Shinnyo-en USA

Christine Hong

Presbyterian Church USA

Roderick Hashimoto

Konko Church of Vancouver

Judith Hertz

Union for Reform Judaism

James Lynch

Rissho Kosei-kai (Engaged Buddhism Community)

Youngsook Kang

Rocky Mountain Annual Conference

Daisy Khan

American Society for Muslim Advancement (ASMA Society)

Antonios Kireopoulos

National Council of Churches of Christ in the USA

Leonid Kishkovsky

Orthodox Church in America

Sue Kopp

Focolare Movement

Kathryn Lohre

Evangelical Lutheran Church in America/NCCC USA

Eli S McCarthy

Conference of Major Superiors of Men

Janice McLaughlin

Maryknoll Sisters

Rich Moline

The United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism

Paul Naamon Monshin

Karuna Tendai Dharma Center

Hazziq Muhammad

The Mosque Cares

Uma Mysorekar

The Hindu Temple Society of North America

Masafumi Nakanishi

The International Shinto Foundation

John Pawlikowski

Servite Fathers

Rohinton Rivetna

Federation of Zoroastrian Associations of North America

C.K. Robertson

The Episcopal Church

Margaret Rose

The Episcopal Church

Thomas Ryan, CSP

Paulist Community

Stephen Sidorak

United Methodist Church

Satpal Singh

World Sikh Council America Region

Arunima Sinha

Hindu Community of South Carolina

Sayyid Syeed

Islamic Society of North America

Karen Georgia Thompson

The United Church of Christ

Arvind Vora

Federation of Jain Associations of North America

Elizabeth Claris Zwareva

Maryknoll Sisters

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable