GOLD2023

Addie Mae Collins Community Services, Inc.

Best kept secret in childcare

aka Addie Mae Collins Community Service   |   New York, NY

Mission

It is the mission Addie Mae Collins Community Service, Inc. to deliver diverse, innovative, high quality programming and comprehensive services collaboratively in a way which is designed and implemented to stimulate learning, healthy development, and positive self-esteem in children and families.

Ruling year info

1968

Executive Director

Diane S. Spann

Main address

2322 3rd Avenue Flr-1

New York, NY 10035 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-6183590

NTEE code info

Kindergarten, Nursery Schools, Preschool, Early Admissions (B21)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (S01)

Voluntarism Promotion (T40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

On September 15, 1963 the 16th Street Baptist Church was bombed and four young Black girls were killed. One of those girls was 14 year old Addie Mae Collins. Their deaths prompted concerned residents in our small corner of East Harlem to take steps to ensure that the struggle for equality, equity, and ever increasing opportunities would have a vehicle to help catapult individuals in their personal exploration for growth and since its inception in this nonprofit agency has continued to provide services primarily to an underserved population living below the poverty line with minimal resources we aim to honor those 4 little girls, their families and the 5th and only survivor by meeting the charge made by Addie Mae’s mother when she gave permission for our existence- to provide a true head start to the young, so that they will be equipped to continue to make changes in the future so that her daughter’s death would not be in vain.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Family Engagement

We are very fortunate to offer a variety of family engagement opportunities. We offer workshops throughout the year that families can participate in, while their children are in our care, but the majority of our events are ones that families can attend together. They eat together, they learn together, and they play together. We have had wonderful turnout at these events, and the feedback we receive is letting us know that families are having a great time!

Population(s) Served
Caregivers
Parents

The Child and Adult Food Care Program is how we can afford to feed your children. The Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) is a federal program that provides reimbursement for healthful meals and snacks served to income eligible children and adults. Because CACFP participants’ nutritional needs are supported on a daily basis, the program plays a vital role in improving the quality of our program and makes it more affordable for families. This program affords Addie Mae Collins an opportunity to expose your children to a variety of healthy food choices by offering breakfast, lunch, and snack and in some cases supper to every child at a free, reduced, or pay rate. No child ever goes hungry at Addie Mae thanks to CACFP. Thanks to CACFP we are able to provide meals for every occasion (including trips). Each family must complete an eligibility application for CACFP.
Many different agencies operate using CACFP, all share the common goal of providing nutritious meals and snacks to participants.
• Child care centers serving meals and snacks to children who are enrolled for care
• Head Start Programs serving meals and snacks to enrolled children
CACFP partially reimburses participating centers for serving nutritious meals. The program is administered at the federal level by the Food and Nutrition Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. CACFP facilities follow the meal patterns established by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).
• Breakfast requires a serving of milk, fruit or vegetable and bread or grain product.
• Lunch and dinner consist of milk, bread or grain product, meat or meat alternate, and two different servings of fruits and/or vegetables.
• Snacks include servings from two or the four components: milk, fruits or vegetables, bread or grain product, or meat or meat alternate.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Economically disadvantaged people

Our program strives to engage families at every step. Families and community partners are always welcome in our facilities- from classroom events and field trips to volunteering in other program areas. Engagement begins with the enrollment. At that time, families sit down with their assigned Family & Community Engagement Specialist (FCES) to complete the enrollment paperwork and share information. The Family Engagement Specialist takes the time to get to know the child and family, and the family receives information about our program, their child’s class, and their engagement opportunities. Families are welcomed into the classroom and other program areas at any time.

The FCES works with volunteers throughout the year and they set goals for families to work toward during the year. The FCES connects families to community resources to address any needs and provides referrals to outside agencies whenever necessary. The FCES also monitors children’s classroom attendance and maintains the child’s file- including health paperwork and immunization record.

In addition, family support staff use a Family Partnership Agreement (FPA) while working with families. The FPA uses measurements across several domains (ie: housing, employment, education) to determine a family’s strengths and areas of need. The FPA is a standardized means of tracking a family’s growth and change over time. The process can be arduous, and the FES works hard to keep it updated throughout the year, and to address any needs that arise during the year.

Population(s) Served
Families
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of administrators and staff who plan and experience professional development activities together

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

AMCCS has an annual retreat for planning and revisiting the agency mission and vision in addition to a planning meeting of key staff and stakeholders to review budget and programmatic alignment.

Number of students who demonstrate improved overall literacy

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Economically disadvantaged people, Students

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Emerging literacy is tracked through one of our community partners. The Reading Team.

Number of students who exhibit kindergarten readiness

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Students, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of children who move on to Kindergarten.

Number of students at or above a 90% attendance rate

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Students, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of children who have emerging literacy skills such as beginning letter recognition and phonological awareness, story comprehension, and use of writing materials.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Economically disadvantaged people, Students

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Directly related to the number of children moving on to Kindergarten.

Number of children who have the ability to seek help from and respond appropriately to adults

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of workers with union affiliations

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of stakeholders or stakeholder groups who agree to engage

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Parent Leaders, Board Members and Community Partners.

Number of children who have access to education

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of direct care staff who received training in trauma informed care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

One Year Participation in Trauma Smart Training Program

Number of clients and family who did not complete the entirety of the program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Parents

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Directly Related to COVID program interruption

Number of children reached with a meal each school day

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Thanks to CACFP no child has gone hungry at AMCCS.

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Funding shifted and the number of children we could serve went down according to the license capacity for serving younger children that came when we adjusted a classroom to operate Early Head Start.

Number of children who have had one volunteer the entirety of the case.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Adults, Seniors

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Our children have the best support system when we ensure that we offer programs that interest the family members.

Number of public events held to further mission

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Families

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

COVID quarantine yielded a different type of volunteerism, family and community engagement.

Number of community initiatives in which the organization participates

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of clients whose nutrition has improved

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of children who received prescription eyeglasses

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of returning volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Parents

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Family and Community Members.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

To provide the best possible care and service to children and families and establish a foundation that builds good character for a well-rounded human being that can contribute positively to their family and greater community
To deliver quality services and experiences which prepare children for their educational future.
To work with and towards Respect, Achievement, Safety, and Responsibility as a member of the Addie Mae Collins Team to,
▫Demonstrate RESPECT by practicing open and honest communication to earn trust and appreciate each individual's uniqueness by treating each individual (child and adult) with dignity.
▫Exhibit a commitment to ACHIEVEMENT by setting and accomplishing goals, taking pride in our services and ownership of our work as we support individuals through initiative, teamwork, and innovation.
▫ ACT SAFELY by promoting a culture and environment that supports sound judgment and decision-making to safeguard the well-being of all, and
▫ Accept RESPONSIBILITY for the benefits and consequences of our actions by being consistent in our quality of service and fair in our treatment of others.

Our program receives Head Start, Early Head Start, Child Care, and Child and Adult Food Care funds, which are earmarked for child development programming. Using those resources we provide early childhood developmental experiences to income eligible children between the ages of 3 and 5 (with priority to children with special needs and homeless families) and Early Head Start follows that same mission for children birth up to 3 years old and support services intended to strengthen families.
A special feature of Early/Head Start is the requirement that parents and caregivers (grandparents, foster and adoptive parents as well as significant family members) participate in making decisions which govern the program and guides its operations so that parents have the opportunity to ensure the best education for their youngsters. While parents engage in policy development and program planning they have the opportunity to master skills that enhance their personal growth toward becoming empowered individuals, and leaders in their community and hands on partners in their child’s education and journey to school readiness. Additionally, CACFP affords Addie Mae Collins an opportunity to expose your children to a variety of healthy food choices by offering breakfast, lunch, and snack and in some cases supper to every child at a free, reduced, or pay rate. No child ever goes hungry while with us and every parent learns where and how to find and secure what they need to keep their family eating healthy.

Our programming allows for:
• Full family engagement
• Opportunities for children to play, learn, and build the skills that get them ready for kindergarten and beyond
• Safe, positive learning environments
• Care five days a week, up to ten hours a day, 12 months of the year
• Experienced and certified teachers
• Free, nutritious meals and snacks
• Care for children with special needs
• Access to community resources such as dental and medical screenings

Through active involvement of parents/caregivers and community members is the key to a successful preschool experience. Through shared decision making the Board of Directors, parent committees (Delegate Agency Policy Committee, and Center Policy Committees, and Parent Advisory Committee various community partners, and through the employment of trained, motivated, nurturing, and dedicated staff and volunteer core allow us to provide a program that encourages and prepares children to reach their full potential. Addie Mae Collins Community Service provides Head Start and Child Care services to the children of East Harlem and its surrounding communities and have since September 1965. Guided by an unerring belief that every child has an innate desire to learn and grow Addie Mae Collins uses the Creative Curriculum to provide children with comprehensive experiences designed to stimulate and foster their cognitive, social, emotional, and physical development even as we stretch the boundaries of program’s guiding principles-the Performance Standards, to reach out to and to include our parents and surrounding community in as many of the children’s early childhood learning opportunities as possible.

We use September, to get acquainted. We host Welcome Breakfasts and Dinners so that families can meet the staff, see what we do each day and how we service the children academically, nutritionally, physically, socially, and in every way we can. Our teachers and Family Support staff completed initial home visits with families. We also host an annual Bring Your Dad to School Day encouraging dads to get involved.
By October we host family orientations on Child Abuse and Domestic Violence and attend Orientation/Curriculum Nights, to help families understand and learn by doing how the children spend their days. We also host a Cool Culture event at a participating cultural institution that participates in the program as Cool Culture is one of our Community Partners. October is also the month for securing parent leaders.
In November we include more family members with our Annual Grandparents events when they come to learn about the program and ways they can get involved. We also host our first Family Night of many.
At this point of the year the children have developed confidence that allows for teachers to venture out to visit Community Helpers and incorporate outside learning into the curriculum.
We use December to garner donations from a partnering community agencies to provide a welcome surprise to families.
January is our bonding month, the time for an annual Retreat takes place bringing together the Board of Directors, Parent Leaders, and Staff to form a consolidated direction for the program.
When February arrives we participate in the New York City Department of Health’s Eat Well Play Hard Champions Program, wherein families got the chance to learn about the food we serve at school-how to incorporate some of what we do into the home and children even began preparing simple snacks to learn more about healthy habits. The spring months kick us into high gear. The children find their confidence and articulate how families can get more involved. By May we start hosting events and activities highlighting the involvement of Moms. We invite families to our Annual Academic Olympics-an event designed to take place over time so families get to really see the variety and scope of the children’s learning and exposures as children take center stage in jeopardy style fast paced question and answer assemblies. The enter family is invited to cheer the children on.
We end the school year with a Children’s Formal Ball, activities that encourage Dads to stay involved and to reward children for their growth during the school year. We spend the summer doing out-of-class learning activities. Then the cycle begins again.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome

Financials

Addie Mae Collins Community Services, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Addie Mae Collins Community Services, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 01/13/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Judy Edwards-Greene


Board co-chair

Derrick Taite

East Harlem Triangle

Term: 2005 -

Yvonne Carey

NYCDOE

Carrie Morris-Sealy

Northern Manhattan Perinatal

LaVelle Walton

Pathways to Housing

Getta Ludwiczak

Teresa Mason

AXA Equitable

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/13/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/13/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.