PLATINUM2024

METRO DC COMMUNITY CENTER INC

Home for LGBTQ+ in Metro DC

aka The DC Center for the LGBT Community   |   Washington, DC   |  www.thedccenter.org

Mission

The mission of the DC Center is to celebrate, strengthen, and support community among the LGBTQ residents and organizations of Metropolitan Washington, DC.

Notes from the nonprofit

Visit our website at www.thedccenter.org for additional information

Ruling year info

2004

Executive Director

Ms. Kimberley Bush

Main address

2000 14th St NW Suite 105

Washington, DC 20009 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

20-0118307

NTEE code info

Lesbian/Gay Rights (R26)

Arts, Cultural Organizations - Multipurpose (A20)

Health Support Services (E60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

LGBTQ individuals face higher than normal rates of: discrimination, violence, murder rates (specifically trans women), discrimination, HIV and other health issues, and harassment. We envision communities where LGBT people feel healthy, safe, and affirmed.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Center Arts

Center Arts is the home for our arts and cultural programs. This includes the Reel Affirmations Film Festival: Washington DC's International LGBTQ Film Festival and RA XTRA: Our Monthly LGBTQ Film Series, Outwrite: Washington DC’s LGBTQ Literary Festival, Arty Queers: Washington DC’s Indoor Monthly LGBTQ+ Art Market, and the DC Queer Theatre Festival. In addition, the DC Center regularly exhibits visual art collections in the Center Arts Gallery. Our art programs fosters inclusive, diverse and creative outlets and opportunities.

Population(s) Served
LGBTQ people

The DC LGBTQ+ Community Center offers individual and group mental health support services for adult LGBTQ+ survivors of violence, abuse and trauma in the District of Columbia and DMV area.
Types of victimization include intimate partner violence/domestic violence, stalking, sexual and/or physical assault, hate crime (racial, religious, gender, sexual orientation, and/or other type of hate crime), bullying, physical abuse/neglect, dating victimization, elder abuse, family violence among other types of primary and secondary traumatization.
Trauma-informed licensed mental health clinicians offer crisis and short-term individual counseling sessions as well as ongoing LGBTQ+ survivor support groups. Services are available in English and Spanish; other languages are accessed through the Language line.
If you are interested in engaging in services, you can find our eligibility guidelines and contact information here: thedccenter.org/behavioral-health/

Population(s) Served
LGBTQ people
Victims of crime and abuse

At Center Aging, our program for older adults, we host a variety of activities where seniors can engage and find community beyond the walls of their homes. This group aims to combat the social isolation and lack of community support too many LGBT seniors face. To accomplish this, we organize social events of all kinds, from 2x weekly social groups, monthly luncheons, and special events.

As part of creating this sense of community, we make one-on-one communication a priority. Whether its DC Center staff reaching out directly to seniors or encouraging seniors to call one another, we highlight the necessity for LGBT seniors to feel included, appreciated, and heard.

Our social gatherings, outreach, and advocacy form a solid foundation upon which we can work together to combat against social isolation so that LGBT older adults in our community can age with a better peace of mind and the support they need.

Population(s) Served
Older adults
Seniors

The DC Center hosts a myriad of social support groups for many segments of the LGBT population in the DC area. The groups meet monthly, bi-weekly, or weekly, depending on the group and are led by trained facilitators to make sure that the environment is safe, supportive, and that every member’s voice can be heard.

Population(s) Served
LGBTQ people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

LGBTQ people, Seniors, People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2017, the DC Center was home to 16 peer-facilitated support and discussion groups.

Number of participants counseled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Victims and oppressed people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2017, the DC Center for the LGBT Community provided 450 trauma-informed treatment sessions to over 45 individuals through individual and group therapy.

Total number of paid admissions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

LGBTQ people

Related Program

Center Arts

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Outwrite, Reel Affirmations XTRA, Reel Affirmations Film Festival

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The DC Center for the LGBT Community educates, empowers, celebrates, and connects the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender communities.

To fulfill our mission, we focus on four core areas: health and wellness, arts & culture, social & peer support, and advocacy and community building. The DC Center has many programs that fit these categories. The DC Anti-Violence Project (DCAVP) works to reduce violence against LGBTQ individuals (and those perceived as LGBTQ) through community outreach, education, and monitoring cases to ensure that the rights and dignity of LGBTQ victims are respected and protected. DCAVP also seeks to assist victims of anti-LGBT violence by advocating on their behalf, encouraging reporting, and providing a community of support. Center Arts is the home for our arts and cultural programs. This includes the Reel Affirmations Film Festival and RA XTRA: Our Monthly LGBTQ Film Series, the OutWrite LGBT Book Festival, the Ignition: The Spoken Series, and the DC Queer Theatre Festival. In addition, the DC Center regularly exhibits visual art collections in the Center Arts Gallery. The DC Center is also home to 16 different peer facilitated support and discussion groups.

The DC Center has a full time Executive Director and a full time social worker that supports the Anti Violence Project. The DC Center also has a part time social worker that supports asylum seekers and refugees, a part time arts director, a part time Latinx program coordinator, and a part time peer educator that distributes condoms across the District.

The DC Center for the LGBT Community had many accomplishments in 2017, including distributing more than 90,000 safer sex across the District of Columbia. Additionally, the DC Center's program for asylum seekers, Center Global, celebrated its five year anniversary. Center Global has helped more than 200 LGBT Asylum Seekers by providing mental health intake sessions, legal referrals, and financial assistance for food and transportation since it started in 2012.
The DC Center brought on its first-ever Arts Director, who handles all arts and cultural programs including the Reel Affirmations film festival, which screened 40 films over four days, OutWrite, the DC Queer Theatre Festival, the spoken word Serious Ignition, and the Center Arts Gallery.
The DC Center was home to 16 different peer-facilitated support and discussion groups including the coming out group which had its three year anniversary this year, and the newest group, the Queer Disability Meetup. Next year the DC Center will launch a new Asian Pacific Islander Queer Support Group.
In 2017, The DC Center through its Anti-Violence Project, successfully provided 450 trauma-informed treatment sessions to over 45 individuals through individual and group therapy, crisis intervention, case management, intake assessments, and advocacy.
Most recently, the DC Center hosted a very successful Bystander Intervention Training on November 19th, 2017. 18 people were in attendance with 17% of the attendees identifying as male.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

METRO DC COMMUNITY CENTER INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

METRO DC COMMUNITY CENTER INC

Board of directors
as of 03/10/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Andrew Zapfel

Patricia Hawkins

Rehana Mohammed

Edward Mansius

Ashley Gibbs

Thomas Flavell

Jonathan Gilad

Justin Campbell

Rebecca Bauer

Preston Hawes

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/10/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/10/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.