HAWAII WILDLIFE CENTER

Providing emergency response, medical and rehabilitative care for native birds and bats statewide, alongside conservation programs that aim to create a community where native wildlife thrive. E pūlama i nā manu Hawaiʻi, cherish the birds of Hawai‘i.

aka HWC   |   Kapaau, HI   |  www.hawaiiwildlifecenter.org

Mission

To protect, conserve and aid in the recovery of Hawai'i's native wildlife through hands-on treatment, research, training, science education and cultural programs.

Ruling year info

2006

Principal Officer

Ms. Linda Elliott

Main address

P.O. Box 551752

Kapaau, HI 96755 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

20-1489691

NTEE code info

Wildlife Preservation/Protection (D30)

Protection of Endangered Species (D31)

Environmental Education and Outdoor Survival Programs (C60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The threats to native species that we are trying to address are: 1) human impacts to wildlife environments including the direct effects of windfarms, powerlines, roadways, contaminants including petroleum, and light pollution, 2) impacts of climate change - as climate change progresses we are seeing an increase in avian diseases that affect already vulnerable native populations, including avian botulism and malaria, 3) absence of an organized wildlife response network for Hawai‘i, 4) community indifference for native species. The Hawai‘i Wildlife Center aims to reverse the extinction trend in our islands and counteract the further loss of native wildlife in the Pacific, as well as to provide a resource that will help humans and native species coexist.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Native Wildlife Hospital - Statewide

The Center routinely treats native, often endangered or threatened, birds and bats annually. We take in sick and injured native wildlife, provide medical treatment and rehabilitative care with the ultimate goal to get the individual back out to the wild. With populations of our native species continuing to fall, every bird successfully returned to the wild is of enormous value.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The HWC provides unique conservation, cultural and educational opportunities including programs to learn conservation science careers and to teach the conservation of Hawaii's natural resources.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Response and care to wildlife affected by disasters including oil spills, contaminant spills, and disease outbreak. Trainings are also provided to first responders.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Providing rapid response to downed seabirds throughout Oahu each year during fallout season. HWC also provides training programs for wildlife first response, response protocol, wildlife handling, etc.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Partner project for the soft release of rehabilitated White Terns on Oahu.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Linda Elliott Outstanding Achievement and HWC Dedication 2007

State of Hawaii House of Representatives

Betty Crocker Community Garden Honor Award 2011

Scenic Hawaii

Proclamation: Hawaii Wildlife Center Day in Kapaau 2011

State of Hawaii

HWC recognized as the 6,000 National Teaming With Wildlife Coalition member 2009

Teaming with Wildlife

BSA Design Award 2012

Boston Society of Architects

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Native Wildlife Hospital - Statewide

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Native bird and bat patient cases at the Hawaii Wildlife Center

Number of phone calls/inquiries

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Native Wildlife Hospital - Statewide

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

HWC also serves as a "wildlife dispatch", assisting callers with species identification and rescue help.

Number of free participants on field trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Education and Outreach

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

HWC offers facility visits to students and groups to learn more about native wildlife rehabilitation and conservation science. Visits were suspended temporarily in 2020 due to COVID precautions.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our primary goal to provide better coverage for wildlife response statewide so we are able to recover as many sick, injured, orphaned, or downed native birds and bats, get them the medical treatment and rehabilitative care that they need, then return them back to their populations. To this end we have been focusing on establishing the partnerships necessary to create satellite facilities as well as identifying beneficial collaborations that would help build our response capabilities. HWC also will continue to follow nationally recognized standards and maintain our high quality of care. This goal has not changed since our hospital opened in 2012, but our experiences have fine-tuned our strategy on how we expand throughout the state.

HWC also has a goal to mitigate the impacts of climate change on our native wildlife, which ties in to our desire to build the capabilities and reach of a statewide wildlife response network in Hawaii. Through the years, it has become clear how important it is that the Hawaii Wildlife Center continue providing training to first responders. Not only does the ongoing training improve the individual’s responder’s skills, it also establishes and maintains valuable relationships that disease response efforts will need in order to be efficient and effective. HWC will continue our vigilance with potential disease trend monitoring as well as continue to be active in conversations with landowners, conservation groups, and state and federal wildlife agencies to make sure climate change effects on native wildlife populations are not overlooked. Many of our goals have not changed since our inception, however we have realized that in addition to these goals we also need to include outreach and awareness-building. We have learned through practice that it is just as important to engage the community in these issues as it is to work with conservation professionals, researchers, and wildlife agency staff.

HWC provides wildlife care services to sick, injured and orphaned native birds and bats statewide and continues to expand professional networks in wildlife rehabilitation, conservation and veterinary circles. We value partnerships and collaborative relationships because we recognize that wildlife rescue truly takes a village, as they say, especially in our island state. We provide relief for native bird and bat patients impacted by a variety of injuries and illnesses, including fractures from vehicle strikes, sickness from rat poison, orphaned due to high winds, injuries from gunshots, etc.

In addition to our annual patient caseload, which has been growing each year, we also provide quick response to hundreds of seabirds confused by urban lighting and enable them to get the care they need in order to get them back out to sea as well as providing assistance to members of the public with wildlife rescue help when needed.

Furthermore, HWC-led trainings help improve the efficiency of statewide wildlife response procedures, ensuring procedures follow response and rehabilitation standards. In 2019 we were also to assist our remote island partners on Wake Island with their wildlife response protocols. Not only did this help the personnel on Wake Island become better prepared for native wildlife emergencies, it was a great opportunity for our staff to become more familiar with the agencies and chain of command involved for remote island rescues.

HWC fills a unique role in protecting ecosystems through our efforts to return sick, injured, or orphaned native species back to their environments healed and healthy. Many of our native Hawaiian species are in rapid decline so we cannot afford to write off individuals that are hurt, sickened or orphaned through both human-caused and natural reasons automatically as a loss. Each bird or bat that we are able to return to the wild contributes to the health of local populations in Hawaii, as well as our island biodiversity. The Hawaii Wildlife Center provides direct and immediate action to mitigate harmful impacts on vulnerable native wildlife and is an essential component of the overall mechanism of Hawaii’s conservation efforts. Our wildlife services function as an additional tool in Hawaii’s conservation toolkit, sharing conservation goals and outcomes with other conservation efforts including habitat protection, predator control, and research.

The Hawaii Wildlife Center opened for wildlife services in 2012 and have been providing quality wildlife care and building partnerships for nearly a decade. We have a team of qualified, experienced and dedicated staff as well as collaborative relationships with state and federal wildlife agencies, veterinary clinics, and other conservation organizations. Since Hawaii is and island state and we care for patients statewide, we have also built up our Wheels for Wildlife and Wings for Wildlife programs to provide ground and air transport for patients throughout the state. We have spent the years since the grand opening of our wildlife hospital fine-tuning our protocols, communications, and operations to make our wildlife rescue work possible.

HWC has been also been active in assisting with avian disease response since we opened our doors in 2012. Most recently, we assisted with an avian botulism outbreak at James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge at the end of 2018 and early 2019. We also assisted with a botulism response on Lanai in 2013.

HWC's wildlife hospital is managed by Wildlife Rehabilitation Manager Dr. Juan Guerra, DVM. Dr. Juan holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Biological Sciences with a Minor in Animal Sciences from Cornell University and a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine Degree, also from Cornell University. While at Cornell University he was awarded the American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists’ Award and the Colonel Floyd C. Sager Equine Obstetrics and Pediatrics Award. In addition to experience from multiple externships, veterinary conferences, and wildlife and exotics symposiums, Dr. Juan was also a volunteer with us at HWC starting in 2013 and was HWC’s primary care veterinarian from 2016-2018 before leaving the island to serve as a clinical fellow and clinical instructor at Oregon State University. While in Oregon, Dr. Juan gained additional wildlife experience as a volunteer at the Chintimini Wildlife Center.

We have invested years of work, outreach, relationship-building, and partnership cultivation to build our wildlife services up to its current level. The seeds we have planted are showing promising signs of growth and we plan to continue this progress. We reached our 1,000th patient milestone in early May 2020, which means we have now cared for over 1,000 patients since opening, and our wildlife intake has not slowed down. As with many small, home-grown organizations, our operations started off gradually then grew as word spread about our wildlife services. The 1,000 patients cared for to date include over 40 different species of native birds as well as the Hawaiian hoary bat and have come from throughout the State of Hawaii. We also continue to provide assistance to research projects that help expand the knowledge base on our native wildlife.

Our Wildlife Rehabilitation Manager Dr. Juan Guerra D.V.M. is fortunate to be supported by a team of wonderful consultant and volunteer veterinarians statewide (and even nationally) that have been critical to our ability to provide highly-specialized medical care to patients. We have also been working more with our state wildlife agency as well as researchers to provide patient data that will help build the knowledge base on our native species. All of these activities are encouraging signs of more growth ahead. Going forward, we plan to continue to hone our wildlife services, grow our statewide reach through ongoing outreach and capacity building, and continue to build Hawai‘i’s wildlife response network through the development and offering of our hands-on trainings and the strengthening of our partnerships.

Financials

HAWAII WILDLIFE CENTER
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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HAWAII WILDLIFE CENTER

Board of directors
as of 02/22/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Shane Vincent

Vincent Construction Management

Term: 2020 - 2024

Linda Elliott

Hawaii Wildlife Center

Rebecca Colvin

Rebecca Colvin Law

Shane Vincent

Vincent Construction Management

Nancy Rustad

3M, Retired

Dr. Kimbereley Greeson

Prescott College

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/2/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data