GOLD2023

United States Eventing Association

Three Phases, Two Partners, One Goal

aka USEA   |   Leesburg, VA   |  www.useventing.com

Mission

The mission of the USEA is much the same as that of the USCTA in 1959: to advance the sport of eventing through education of riders, trainers, officials, and organizers, with the health and well-being of the horse of paramount importance. The Association, through the direction of the Board of Governors, continues to strive to make the sport of eventing safe, fun, fair, and affordable to all who join our ranks.

Ruling year info

1981

President

Louise Leslie

Main address

525 Old Waterford Road NW

Leesburg, VA 20176 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

22-6071187

NTEE code info

Other Recreation, Sports, or Leisure Activities N.E.C. (N99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add a problem overview.

Login and update

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Eventing Coaches Program

Eventing coaches are essential to the training of riders and their horses for humane, safe, and skilled participation in the sport of eventing. Started in 2002, the USEA Eventing Coaches Program (ECP), formerly known as the USEA Coachs' Certification Program (ICP), educates all levels of eventing coaches to confirm their knowledge base, both theoretical and practical, upon which they will continue to build throughout their teaching lifetime. To register with USEA’s Eventing Coaches Program, ask questions, and obtain further information about ECP, contact Nancy Knight at [email protected] or (703) 669-9997.

Population(s) Served

Eventing officials include judges, technical delegates (TD), and course designers (CD). They are licensed by the United States Equestrian Federation (USEF) at the 'r', 'R', and 'S' levels and by the FEI at the FEI levels.

The USEA Training Programs for Eventing Officials (TPEO) is for members who wish to become licensed officials or those who wish to further their education but not necessarily pursue licensure with the Federation. The USEA also conducts Continuing Education Clinics (CEC) for members who are already licensed officials. Anyone may attend the ‘r’, ‘R’, or ‘S’ dressage, cross-country/jumping, or course designer TPEO or CEC.

Population(s) Served

The Young Rider (YR) program is offered through the USEA for riders 25 years of age and younger of all levels of riding. The purpose of the program is to encourage younger members to become involved in the sport of eventing and continue this involvement into their adult lives. The program seeks to promote a love of the sport as well as an appreciation and understanding of the horse while fostering the wonderful relationship that can develop between horse and rider. Further, involvement in this program helps to instill important moral values, such as responsibility and work ethic, as young riders grow into mature adults. This program is divided into 10 Areas throughout the country, and each Area program is facilitated by a volunteer YR Coordinator. Each coordinator oversees the program for his/her Area and sets up different educational and developmental activities their young riders to attend. Camps, clinics, and seminars are usually offered, often with Olympic athletes and ECP coaches

Population(s) Served
Adults

The USEA Adult Rider Program is for all adults, professional or amateur, 22 years and older. The program aims to include adults across all skill and experience levels in a supportive program that promotes education, volunteerism, friendly competition, recognition, and just plain fun! The goal of the Adult Rider program is to increase adult rider participation in eventing as riders and volunteers.

This program is divided into 10 Areas throughout the country, and each Area program is facilitated by a volunteer Adult Rider Coordinator. Each coordinator oversees the program for their Area and sets up different educational and team related activities for their adult riders to participate in. Each Area offers at least one Adult Team Challenge (ATC) at a designated Area event each year.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The purpose of the USEA Emerging Athletes U21 (EA21) Program is to identify and provide consistent quality instruction to the next generation of elite event riders. The aim is to create a pipeline for potential team riders by identifying and developing young talent, improving horsemanship and riding skills, and training and improving skills and consistency.

The USEA Emerging Athletes U21 Program was launched in 2022 with a model of five summertime regional clinics taught by selected USEA Eventing Coaches Program (ECP) instructors, leading to a winter national camp consisting of selected Young Riders from the regional clinics. Athletes who are 21 years or younger, are current members of their USEA Young Rider Area program, and are established at the Training Level or higher, are eligible to apply for the EA21 program.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Preteens
Children
Adolescents

The aim of this program is to drive educational opportunities for grooms, sustainability for groom careers, and promote equine management and welfare.

Population(s) Served

The USEA Young Event Horse Program (YEH) is best described as an eventing talent search. YEH's first season as an official program of the USEA was in 2005. The program's goal is to identify young horses that possesses the talent and disposition that, with proper training, can excel in the uppermost levels of eventing. While the ultimate aim is to identify the future five-star horses, many fine event horses who will excel at the lower levels will also be showcased.

The Program gives owners and breeders the opportunity to showcase the potential of their four- and five-year-old horses while encouraging the breeding and development of top-level event horses for the future. Classes focus on education and preparation of the event horse in a correct and progressive manner.

Population(s) Served

The driving force behind the sport of eventing is the many amazing volunteers! The USEA Volunteer Incentive Program (VIP) exists to increase the ease of participation, provide incentives, and recognize the tireless efforts of volunteers. Supporting and empowering volunteerism has been highlighted in recent years as the Association has looked for ways to recognize these unsung heroes. The program’s roots first began to grow thanks to the many efforts of the late Seema Sonnad, and they continued to grow thanks to the ongoing commitment of Seema’s fellow volunteer enthusiasts. VIP was officially born in December of 2015 when the USEA Board of Governors voted to approve the new program. In 2017, after the success of Area II’s pilot project, VIP rolled out an online management portal nationwide. Available through www.EventingVolunteers.com or the smartphone app for iOS and Android devices, the portal is designed to streamline the volunteer process for both volunteers and organizers.

Population(s) Served

In 2014, the USEA Board of Governors approved the creation of the Intercollegiate Eventing Program as an official program of the USEA. Originally proposed with input from the Intercollegiate Eventing League, the program was established to provide a framework on which eventing teams and individual competitors could flourish at universities and colleges across the country. Collegiate athletic programs have been the training grounds for Olympians, amateur athletes, and professional athletes for generations. Enabling students to train in the Olympic sport of eventing is a natural addition.

Population(s) Served

In August 2020, the USEA Board of Governors approved the creation of the USEA Interscholastic Eventing League (IEL) as an official program of the USEA. The mission of IEL is to bring together junior riders with a common interest and provide a supportive community through which students can continue to pursue their riding interests. This program will encourage team camaraderie and will give junior members a chance to compete in a team atmosphere. This program will also help provide a pathway for those riders who seek to be part of a collegiate eventing program as they graduate high school.

The goal of the IEL is to increase membership, education, and engagement in riders on a national level who are in 7th through 12th grade.

Population(s) Served
Children
Preteens
Young adults

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

United States Equestrian 2023

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Financials

United States Eventing Association
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

United States Eventing Association

Board of directors
as of 01/09/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Louise Leslie

Brian Murray

Siobhan O'Brien

Sharyn Antico

Mogie Bearden-Muller

Dana Bivens

Teresa Harcourt

Jennifer Howlett Rousseau

Rusty Lowe

John Marshall

Lauren Nicholson

Yvonne Ocrant

Shawn Ortiz

Molly Pellegrini

Wayne Quarles

Deeda Randle

Erin Tomson

Cynthia Wiseman

Jacob Fletcher

Shelley Howerton Page

Melanie Loschiavo

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/9/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/29/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.