The Gesu School, Inc.

aka Gesu School   |   Philadelphia, PA   |  www.gesuschool.org

Mission

Inspired by the Jesuit and IHM traditions of social justice, faith, hope and love, Gesu School strives, with open admissions, to provide a quality, innovative education for its neighbor children to empower them to break the cycle of poverty and violence.

Ruling year info

1995

President and CEO

Mr. Bryan H. Carter

Main address

1700 West Thompson Street

Philadelphia, PA 19121 USA

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EIN

23-2728931

NTEE code info

Primary/Elementary Schools (B24)

Kindergarten, Nursery Schools, Preschool, Early Admissions (B21)

Roman Catholic (X22)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

After School Program

Gesu’s after-school initiative serves approximately 100 students. This includes more than 40% of all students in pre-K through 4th grade. To ensure that as many children benefit from the After School program as possible, the program is provided for a nominal cost to families. The full cost is offset through private donations and foundation grants. The After School program runs from 3:10 until 6:00 pm, Monday through Friday throughout the school year.

The After School program is designed to meet two intersecting needs. Research
shows that inner-city children are at particular risk of encountering and engaging in high risk behavior in the hours after school. For unsupervised children in North
Philadelphia, there are real risks. Organizations throughout the community
strive to provide safe havens, but there is a shortage of programming for elementary students. At the same time, these children have a real need to make independent choices and to begin building stronger relationships outside of their families. The After School program encourages this growth in a safe, caring environment.

All of Gesu’s programs are designed to work together to support academic achievement and prepare students for lifelong success. The After School program options are meant to be fun activities, but they serve the school’s academic goals. Too many children growing up in disadvantaged neighborhoods such as North Philadelphia do not have the same opportunities to master new skills, new ideas and new vocabulary as more affluent children. The After School program provides new
experiences and encourages curiosity and engagement.

Population(s) Served

Children in Gesu’s North Philadelphia community have few options for safe, well-supervised care during the summer months, and too little exposure to new activities and ideas. Meanwhile, high levels of crime and violence create daily risks for children.

Summer break creates long-term difficulties for children in this community as well. Studies repeatedly show that all children lose some ground academically over the summer. On average, children test two months further ahead in math at the end of the school year than they do the next fall. The loss is greater for inner-city children. Even worse, inner-city children’s reading skills decline, while more affluent children’s skills improve slightly. The cumulative impact of summer learning loss throughout elementary school plays a major role in the high school achievement gap between these two groups.

Gesu’s Academic Summer Camp is a safe haven for children in North Philadelphia during the summer. It provides experiences that broaden campers’ horizons, fueling their curiosity and ambition. Above all else, it prevents summer learning loss, keeping our children from losing academic skills and preparing them to achieve in the coming school year.

Eighty neighborhood children, ages 5 through 12, will find a nurturing home in the five-week camp. The program operates from 8:30 am to 2:30 pm, with aftercare available until 5:00 pm. Breakfast and lunch are provided to ensure that, regardless of family need, no camper goes hungry.

Activities and field trips expose campers to a wide array of new ideas. There will be weekly field trips to museums, including the Constitution Center and the Wagner Free Institute of Science, as well as a weekly trip to St. Joseph’s Prep to swim. Afternoon sessions will be devoted to arts and enrichment projects.

The academic component is the most important element of the camp. Every child will spend three hours each morning in reading, writing and study skills classes. They will work in small groups with experienced teachers and volunteer tutors.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

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Awards

No Place for Hate® 2015

Anti Defamation League

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Mission Statement
Inspired by the Jesuit and IHM traditions of social justice, faith, hope and love, Gesu School strives without selective admissions, to provide a quality, innovative education for its neighbor children to empower them to break the cycle of poverty and violence.

The following goals are outlined in the GESU SCHOOL STRATEGIC PLAN 2013-2016.

The Institutional Pillar

Goal I: Ensure that Gesu successfully adheres to its Jesuit/IHM philosophy and traditions even through periods of leadership and faculty succession.
Goal II: Ensure that Gesu and its senior staff will always have a Board of Trustees it can depend upon for rigorous guidance and significant support in the face of its present challenges and future uncertainties.

The Program Pillar

Goal #1: To continually strengthen and improve the programs through which we develop our students – and to do it in a way that is understandable, tangible, and measurable.
Goal #2: Ensure that Gesu graduates possess the technological literacy they will need to be successful in the 21st century and that faculty members are confident in their ability to use technology to improve instructional practices and student engagement.
Goal #3: Provide students with the adult guidance they need to proceed successfully through their education and development into adulthood.

The Financial Pillar

Goal #1: Develop a diverse and stable base of funding to meet operational needs.
Goal #2: Prepare adequately to anticipate and plan for future financial needs, including capital.

Strategy #1: Enlist the support of key personnel in the regional provinces of both the Jesuit and IHM Provinces to address continuing mission effectiveness and the eventual issues of succession planning.
Strategy #2: Participate actively in the Jesuit Collaborative, a program that provides Ignatian spirituality exercises and training, as well as similar IHM programs.
Strategy #3: Codify the essential attributes of the Gesu model, identifying those things we do intentionally and those we do intuitively, so that we have a common understanding that will permit us to optimize, adapt, replicate, build upon and articulate it clearly.
Strategy #4: In light of the constantly changing demographics of our neighborhood, evaluate our service area and admissions criteria on a regular basis.
Strategy #5: With a firm commitment to non-selective admissions, ensure that we provide the appropriate level of support to all our students regardless of their intellectual ability or unique learning styles.
Strategy #6: Commit purposefully to a comprehensive program of community service for faculty and students.
Strategy #7: Expand and refine the governance practices of the Board.
Strategy #8: Commit to adopting acknowledged best practices for high-achieving boards.
Strategy #9: Ensure clear Board accountability for the success of the School and its students at all levels of the organization.
Strategy #10: Define and document the pedagogy and programs that together constitute the core of Gesu School’s curricular and extracurricular program.
Strategy #11: Develop quantitative and qualitative measurements of student academic achievement and program impact.
Strategy #12: Review curriculum and implement action plans to improve key areas of the academic program, beginning with Math.
Strategy #13: Identify and support additional programs of professional development for faculty members.
Strategy #14: Investigate the potential effectiveness and feasibility of beginning the formal educational program at Gesu when the child is 3 years old (instead of 4 years old).
Strategy #15: Evaluate the School’s aging technology infrastructure, including wiring, network

Implementation of the strategies/action steps for achieving our goals will be assigned to a Strategic Plan Implementation Committee (SPIC), co-chaired by the Board Strategic Planning Committee Chair and the President of the School with administrative support provided by the President’s Administrative Assistant. This Committee will oversee the creation of an annual operating plan to prioritize and implement the strategies outlined herein. The SPIC will meet regularly to monitor progress of the operating plan, develop appropriate outcome measures and make adjustments to the plan as warranted, reporting its status to the Board on a regular basis. Membership of the SPIC will consist of those staff/faculty/board members assigned primary responsibility for implementation of the various action steps. Others, such as educational experts or technology specialists, may be called upon to help accomplish specific action items.

Gesu’s most important constituencies (board members, administrative leaders, faculty/staff, parents, supporters) must understand the plan as it applies to them because their support is essential to its successful implementation. Therefore, a communication plan that identifies each important audience, key message points, communications approach and timeframe must be designed and executed as soon as the plan is ready for implementation. A communications team will be designated and will report to the Strategic Plan Implementation Committee.

We believe this infrastructure of support and accountability will ensure the successful attainment of our goals and fulfillment of our mission.

While Gesu School continuously strives to fulfill its mission and meet the needs of its 450 students, the Strategic Plan goals are a work-in-progress. The Strategic Plan was approved by Gesu's Board of Directors on October 18th. The Executive Committee is meeting March 10th which will be our first meeting in which we discuss our progress.

Financials

The Gesu School, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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The Gesu School, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 10/26/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

J. Gordon Cooney

Morgan, Lewis & Bockius

J. Gordon Cooney

No Affiliation

Winston J. Churchill

No Affiliation

Robert M. McAlaine

No Affiliation

Keith Pension

No Affiliation

Barbara Renninger

No Affiliation

John E. Backe

No Affiliation

Edward Beckett

No Affiliation

Aliya Browne

No Affiliation

George W. Bur

No Affiliation

William J. Byron

No Affiliation

Joseph J. Cathcart

No Affiliation

Ellen Churchill

No Affiliation

James L. Crawford

No Affiliation

Rard Davies

No Affiliation

Thomas A Decker

No Affiliation

John DiIulio

No Affiliation

Vivienne Lambert Ehret

No Affiliation

Leon Ellerson

No Affiliation

Rosemary Espanol

No Affiliation

Peter G. Gould

No Affiliation

James F. Higgins

No Affiliation

Leonard M. Klehr

No Affiliation

Lisa Korn-Blank

No Affiliation

Nyree S. Lyons

No Affiliation

Byron McCook

No Affiliation

Michael A. Nutter

No Affiliation

Kay O'Grady

No Affiliation

Kenneth Phelan

No Affiliation

Stephen S. Phillips

No Affiliation

Louis R. Pichini

No Affiliation

Steven S. Piltch

No Affiliation

Julia Rafferty

No Affiliation

Daniel Ruff

No Affiliation

Susan Martinelli Shea

No Affiliation

Daryl J. Shore

No Affiliation

Mark I. Solomon

No Affiliation

Stephen D. Thorne

No Affiliation

Randi Zemsky

No Affiliation

Terence J. Connors

No Affiliation

John J. Curry

No Affiliation

Christopher Fallon

No Affiliation

John Krzeminski

No Affiliation

Eilise Rouse

No Affiliation

Paul Welch

No Affiliation

Mary Ellen Tennity

No Affiliation

Janet Mary Walters

No Affiliation

Stephen Anne Roderiguez

Katherine Hovde

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes