Pittsburgh Pastoral Institute

Interfaith Counseling & Consulting Since 1964

aka Pittsburgh Pastoral Institute   |   Pittsburgh, PA   |  pittsburghpastoralinstitute.org

Mission

The Pittsburgh Pastoral Institute exists to enhance the health of individuals, families, and communities through an interfaith ministry of counseling and education that integrates the resources of faith and the behavioral sciences.

Ruling year info

1965

Executive Director

Patricia Campbell

Main address

6324 Marchand Street

Pittsburgh, PA 15206 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

25-1140337

NTEE code info

Mental Health Treatment (F30)

Interfaith Issues (X90)

Family Counseling, Marriage Counseling (P46)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2021, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add a problem overview.

Login and update

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Counseling Program

The Counseling program is the largest and most influential program. It encompasses all of the counseling (individual, couple, and family) and consultation that our therapists provided through branch offices in multiple counties. The exceptional diversity of our staff also helps us to match prospective clients with the "ideal" therapist that they have in mind—particularly if there is a gender, racial, or religious-background preference. While every counseling experience is unique, the overall approach seeks to provide an empathic relationship in which clients can safely and freely discuss their problems and concerns. The main goal is for client and therapist to work together to resolve them as far as possible, along with promoting personal growth, self-awareness, and meaningful relationships with the important people in one's life. This is a "client-centered" process in which the client determines the particular areas of discussion and exploration in a given session. It also is a "faith-friendly" process in which spiritual and religious concerns can be discussed, if a client chooses to do so.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

The Career Assessment and Development (CAD) program provides extensive psychological testing and assessment for candidates entering various forms of ordained ministry and religious life. CAD assessments are performed by a licensed psychologist.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Spiritual direction is the process by which a director walks alongside an individual or group as they seek to develop or deepen meaning in their journey. By listening deeply, the director helps to create a "sacred space" in which persons become oriented toward a life of awareness, naming and engaging their inner-life movements while interacting with the world around them. Transformation occurs through a holistic approach of attending to our mind, body, heart and spirits.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Distinguished Service Center Award 1999

American Association of Pastoral Counselors

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Pittsburgh Patoral Institute (PPI) offers mental health counseling and education serving thousands of consumers across the Pittsburgh region in Allegheny, Westmoreland, and Armstrong counties. As an interfaith behavioral health organization, PPI is a faith-friendly, inclusive environment which spiritual and religious concerns can be brought into the therapeutic process as preferred by the client. PPI accepts Medical Assistance, Medicare, and most commercial insurances with the fully licensed clinical staff. The Spiritual Direction Program, Career Assessment and Development for ordination candidates and Continuing Education Programs also support faith leaders, mental health professionals, congregations, and the overall community.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    As of March 19, 2020 PPI shifted from in person counseling and education to telecommunications to provide services to as many individuals, couples, and families as possible. Telecommunications means using several ways in which our counselors are able to meet with you that do not require face to face interaction. The CDC recommendations are critical to keep you and our staff safe while also honoring our community’s well-being. Upon a recent client survey, 94% felt comfortable communicating with their therapist through telecommunications and 49% said they would like to continue virtually even once the in-person sessions are safe to resume. PPI is now working toward sustain telehealth support to accomidate this feedback and create availability to many who were not reachable before.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    This brief survey helped support the needs of our clientele and this opportunity brought on an enormous outpouring of support to our therapists, operational staff, and leadership team to lifted each other up and helped strengthen our community to continue throughout these challenging times. The survey gave our clients the opportunity to have a say and provide essential feedback that helped shape the future of alternative modalities of services.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Pittsburgh Pastoral Institute
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Pittsburgh Pastoral Institute

Board of directors
as of 08/09/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Robert Ryan, L.P.C., N.C.C.

Program Supervisor of CSBBH services; Matilda Theiss UPMC Private Practice; AIBDT


Board co-chair

N/A Matthew Muldoon, MD. M.P.H.

Professor of Medicine, Epidemiology and Psychology; University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

Rev. Liddy Barlow

Executive Minister; Christian Associates of Southwest Pennsylvania

Jack Cahalane, PhD, MPH

Chief, Adult Services, Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry; Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic UPMC Health System

John Lovelace

Chief Program Officer; Community Care Behavioral Health President; UPMC for You, Inc. President; Government Programs and Individual Advantage

Wendy Mars, Ph.D.

Associate Professor; University of Pittsburgh Department of Pathology Director Cellular and Molecular Pathology Graduate Program; University of Pitts

Abdesalam Soudi, Ph.D.

University of Pittsburgh Lecturer in Sociolinguistics and Linguistic Internship Advisor, Department of Linguistics Cultural and Linguistic Competence Master’s Course Co-Director, Family Medicine Department Fellow, European Society for Person Centered Healthcare