PLATINUM2023

Begin Again Horse Rescue Inc.

One by one together we will make a difference

Honeoye, NY   |  www.beginagainrescue.org

Mission

Our mission is to provide a safe environment for at-risk, neglected, abandoned and injured horses; to prevent as many as possible from going to slaughter or being euthanized. We will rehabilitate them when possible and find permanent homes for them. We will also promote non-cruelty to animals by focusing efforts on raising awareness and disseminating information to the public concerning the nature and proper care of horses and the plight these animals face at this time. Additionally, we will help community members maintain their horses at home when illness or financial difficulties arise temporarily. We also provide funding for gelding stallions to prevent indiscriminate breeding situations and to help with the costs of humane euthanasia.

Notes from the nonprofit

Begin Again Horse Rescue won the ASPCA's Help A Horse Day Contests in 2013 and 2014 and was awarded a $10,000 and $5000 grant each time. We are inspected and approved by the American Association of Equine Practioners yearly. We have been rated Equus Foundation's Guardian status each of the last 7 years. We were Accredited by the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries in 2020. Begun as a grass roots organization we are still run almost totally by volunteers. Our two part-time equine care givers provide continuity of care and training to the equine in our rescue program. We retain ownership of the horses, adopting them out with a Permanent Lease Contract that has a no breeding/no racing clause. If an animal can no longer be kept, it must be returned to Begin Again Horse Rescue. In 2022 we are promoting the use of microchips in horses to add to equine safety nets. We are also beginning a pilot project in 2022 of Equine Assisted Learning for special need students.

Ruling year info

2009

Executive Director/President

Mrs. Jennifer Leslie Lilly

Director of Grants and Fund Raising

Mrs. Harriett M Rubins

Main address

PO Box 28

Honeoye, NY 14471 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Birdsall Horse Rescue and Sanctuary Inc

EIN

27-0234285

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (B01)

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Begin Again Horse Rescue’s ability to maintain and grow its rescue and educational programs and therefore, to continue its positive community impact of reducing the number of unwanted horses, is restricted by its physical facility’s limitations. Its programs have outgrown its 60-year-old barn. Since this old 28-acre farm was donated to us, we have continuously made improvements, adding run-in sheds, fencing, and stalls within the indoor arena so that every equine has its own stall, upgrading the electricity to code, and more. The farm is at maximum capacity for our rescue and educational programs. This year we will secure adequate funding to build our new 8 stall barn, moving the arena stalls to the new barn and, once again using the arena for training, thereby ensuring long-term success of our rehabilitation equine programs.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Educational Outreach

We have created outreach programs to present to local organizations such as Rotary Clubs, 4-H and community horse owners/animal lovers, and school children concerning the importance of caring for horses properly and  how to identify signs of abuse or neglect. We also provide work experience to those mandated by law enforcement, schools, and/or Departments of Social Services.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

As a partner with the Livingston County Mobile Work Force, we provided experiences involving horse care, small building projects and grounds maintenance. These work experiences help unemployed people in the program get work experiences that will enable them to gain skills needed for them to obtain permanent positions.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Begin Again Horse Rescue Inc., takes in injured, neglected, abused or abandoned horses provides shelter, good nutrition, training and veterinary care. Afterwards, through a grass roots effort, it finds good permanent homes for them. No horse can be sold, but must be returned by the adopter to Begin Again if it can no longer be kept.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Begin Again provides a safe setting for young adults with mental challenges, such as autism, to learn the trade of barn caretaker. Students from the organization Arc, come to the farm for two hours, three times a week, to learn barn maintenance; how to clean and set up stalls for horses, rake/sweep the barn and paddocks, clean water buckets and troughs, and check fences. The goal is for them to be comfortable and capable enough to have a farm position after these hands-on experiences. Additionally, we have noted that their enjoyment and self esteem have improved during and after these sessions..

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Families

When room at Begin Again Horse Rescue is available, our intake chairperson goes to the local horse auction and purchases 1-4 horses from the kill-pen, horses most likely to end at a slaughter facility in Canada or Mexico. We advertise and raise funds for this specific purpose. We call these donors Guardian Angels.

Population(s) Served
Adults

In an effort to reduce the number of unwanted horses, Begin Again Horse Rescue provides gelding assistance to local residents who need help paying for gelding their stallions. It requires some volunteer work in return for the funds.

Population(s) Served

Begin Again Horse Rescue provides financial support for equine euthanasia when quality of life is no longer possible for the animal.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Awards

Free Vaccine Program and reduced veterinary charges 2016

The Unwanted Horse Veterinary Relief Campaign (UHVRH)

Educator of the Year 2008 for Exec. Director, Harriett Rubins 2008

Genesee Valley Equine Clinic, Scottsville, NY

Free Vaccine Program and Reduced Veterinary charges 2021

The Unwanted Horse Veterinary Relief Campaign

National Rescue of the Year 2020

Equis Save Foundation

Guardian 2020

Equus Foundation

Microchip Grant 2020

Kenneth A Scott Charitable Trust

Veterinary Grant 2020

Doris Day Foundation

Inspection Approval and free vaccine program. 2021

The Unwanted Horse Veterinary Relief Campaign

Grant to Provide Microchips to Horses 2021

Kenneth A Scott Charitable Trust

Award to Provide Access for Physically Challenged Volunteers and Visitors 2022

Daisy Marquis Jones Foundation

Free Vaccine Program 2022

The Unwanted Horse Veterinary Relief Campaign

Affiliations & memberships

American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals 2018

Humane Society of the United States 2018

Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries Accredited 2020

Equis Saves Foundation National Rescue of the Year 2020

Equus Foundation Guardian 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals euthanized

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Family relationships

Related Program

Horse Rescue, Rehabilitation and Adoption

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Horses are euthanized only after veterinary recommendations because the horses can no longer live a pain managed, comfortable life.

Average number of days of shelter stay for animals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

Horse Rescue, Rehabilitation and Adoption

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

2017 was the first year for tracking this metric

Number of animals rehomed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

Horse Rescue, Rehabilitation and Adoption

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Since we retain ownership of the horses, it is our policy to take back any horse that can no longer be kept. In 2017, thirteen horses were returned to Begin Again. 2 were returned in 2020, 3 in 2021

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We provide a safe, temporary home for at-risk horses, giving them much needed veterinary health care, and training to make them more adoptable to members of the horse community.

We find permanent homes for the horses we rescue and follow them for the rest of their lives.

We provide a safety net for our rescued horses and their owners, so they will never be exposed to neglect or starvation again.

We provide education and public outreach in the surrounding communities, teaching proper care of horses and helping horse owners find solutions for their horse care problems. We also emphasize and and explain how to identify horse neglect or abuse and what an individual can, should and should not do when trying to help the situation.

We teach volunteers the proper way to care for horses and run a barn during weekly volunteer hours on Saturdays. This has lead to retaining long-term, dedicated volunteers to help care for the horses.

We help community members within our two-hour service radius to keep their horses at home during a temporary crisis.

We set an example to local communities by demonstrating sound horse husbandry.

We fund gelding surgery for those horse owners who otherwise would be unable to pay for this service, thereby reducing the unwanted horse population. We also provide funds for humane euthanasia when help is required.

We provide disaster relief for those who have gone through emergencies and require assistance. We have aided farms buried under 8 feet of snow with a collapsed barn, brought feed and hay to a family whose breadwinners were temporary disabled, and provided grain and hay to abandoned horses until we could move them to our farm. We maintain a small fund to support horse owners in extreme situations.

In the summer of 2022, with a grant from the Mary Clark Thompson Foundation we initiated a program of called Horses Helping Humans, combining community members with special needs and our rescued horses, so that all benefited with interactive experiences that helped humans and horses to learn new skills one step at a time.

Interact with community members in positive ways and inform the community of our mission, while networking with other organization with similar goals.

Provide free training sessions for local people and prospective volunteers. Educate potential adopters on the basics of horse care and handling to help them succeed as horse owners.

Provide resources for local horse owners and adopters who need problem solving.

Grow our fundraising efforts to insure the organization's solvency.

Use social media, mailings, and open houses to introduce our organization or recruit supporters and volunteers, and show how we help horses throughout the year.

Build a community of dedicated volunteers whose goals align with our mission and provide opportunities for them to build long-lasting relationships with like-minded people.

Inspect prospective adopters' farms before adoption and yearly after adoption to make sure the horses will never again be neglected or abused.

Bring students with identified special needs together so that they learn skills with the help of rescued horses.

In 2014, a 25 acre horse farm with a five stall barn, indoor arena and fenced pastures was donated to Begin Again Horse Rescue. As we make upgrades and additions such as new fencing, new stalls, and more run-in sheds, we are able to care for more at-risk horses. We have two half-time paid employee who oversee the farm and provide continuity of care for the resident horses. All additional needs at the rescue is provided by our volunteers. This volunteer staff include many horse knowledgeable people, farriers, trainers, chiropractors, massage therapists and animal health technicians who give of themselves when needed. We receive either free or discounted services from our veterinarians, dentist, and farrier. We also train novice volunteers to become capable caregivers. Additionally, the indoor arena enables us to exercise horses during western New York's severe winters and to hold community educational events. In September 2020 we were able to move our used-tack shop to the house on the property. It is our goal to increase income from this enterprise while also using part of the building as a learning center for our future projects and a secure meeting place where community groups can come together.

We celebrate our fourteen year anniversary in October 2023. During the years of our existence Begin Again Horse Rescue has taken in/placed more than 300 equine. We utilize both foster care and trainers to help each equine become good citizens and more adoptable. In September 2014 we moved our resident horses to our donated new facility, one mile north of the original farm. We increased our capacity from 8 to 20 horses. Although our organization is still run mainly by volunteers, we now have 4 part time paid employees who provide continuity of care and program for our resident horses. At the end of 2022 there were 14 equine living at the farm and four in foster care, awaiting adoption. While we always have a waiting list of owners wanting to surrender their equine, we accept our intakes in order of necessity and will never turn away law enforcement requests.
No horse from Begin Again Horse Rescue can ever be sold or even given away. The adopted horse must be returned to Begin Again Horse Rescue if it is no longer wanted. Prospective adopters' and their farms must go through a rigorous application and evaluation process. We have successfully monitored all of the alumni for the last fourteen years to make sure they are safe and can never again be neglected or abused.
In December 2020 the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries Accredited Begin Again Horse Rescue. We are GFAS proud. In 2021, the Kenneth A Scott Charitable Trust Awarded us a generous grant which we used to purchase microchips for all program equine. This was one more step in the plan to safeguard all of Begin Again Horse Rescue's residents, past and present.
We have continuously evolved into a rescue that sets an example for equine rescue and care. Our next goal is to enlarge our facility with an 8 stall barn so that the indoor arena, where six large box stalls are now located, can again be used for training. Our long range goal is to help reduce the unwanted horse problem that exists in our surrounding locales.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Begin Again Horse Rescue Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Begin Again Horse Rescue Inc.

Board of directors
as of 05/02/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mrs Jennifer Lilly

Begin Again Horse Rescue

Term: 2022 - 2026

Harriett Rubins

Board of Director, Fund Raising, Grant Writing, Publicity

Jennifer L Lilly

President/Board of director, Owner/Operator Bristol Valley Training Center, Vice President of Begin Again Horse Resue Inc

Deborah Callaway

Vice President,Board of Director, Begin Again Horse Rescue

Mary Hawley

Secretary/Treasurer of Begin Again Horse Rescue

Emily Artruc

Director/Librarian, experienced non-profit volunteer, equine instructor, data entry volunteer

Dawn Larson

Director/Master Gardener, Data Entry, Equine Owner, Tack Shop Volunnteer

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/15/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/03/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.