PLATINUM2024

CLEVELAND CENTER FOR ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY

aka New Bridge Cleveland Center for Arts and Technology   |   Cleveland, OH   |  www.newbridgecleveland.org

Mission

VISION To help end health disparities and achieve health equity. MISSION For all our students to achieve optimal health by integrating mental and physical well-being and life purpose for themselves and our community.

Ruling year info

2010

President & Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Bethany Friedlander

Chief Finance Officer/Chief Operating Officer

Mr. Arman Ochoa

Main address

3634 Euclid Avenue Suite 100

Cleveland, OH 44115 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

27-1193704

NTEE code info

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Adult

New Bridge offers training in three in-demand healthcare career fields: Phlebotomy, Medical Assisting and Sterile Processing.

The ten-week, 300-hour Phlebotomy program prepares students to collect blood specimens for analysis in clinical labs. Students receive 140 hours of classroom training and 160 hours of clinical training through a hospital-based externship.

The twenty-week 700-hour Sterile Processing Technician Program: prepares students to sit for the Healthcare Sterile Processing Associations' Certified Registered Central Service Technician (CRCST). Sterile Processing Technicians are an integral part of a healthcare facility, as they decontaminate, inspect, assemble, disassemble, package, and sterilize surgical instruments.

The ten-month, 900- hour Medical Assistant (MA) training program prepares students to sit for and obtain a National Healthcare's Certification as a CCMA (Certified Clinical Medical Assistant) upon completion of the program.

Population(s) Served
Adults

CLE | LEAD Part I
Are you interested in the arts?!
Do you want to nurture your creative side as you develop key social and leadership skills?!

CLE|LEAD is the space for you!

We encourage young people to join us in exploring their future dreams through advancing their art talents and meeting new friends. Picture it: state of the art creative studios with cameras, 3D printers, pottery wheels, lights, backdrops, painting murals, sketching models, and computers. In addition to the amazing building. The staff are just as cool! Steph, Mrs. Eddy, Mr. Banks, BAM, Anastasia, and Mr. Z are all professional teaching artists and facilitators with different backgrounds and experiences.

CLE|LEAD = leadership, building positive community, and Social-Emotional Learning!

So what we are really saying is that the program is here to empower folks to improve the skills that we all need to be successful, drama-free, happier, and fulfilled in the world. We offer classes in the following areas:
1. Ceramics/Sculpting (pottery wheel, hand building, state of the art kilns, lots of clay)
2. Photography (work with professional models, high-quality digital cameras, studio, and onsite shoots)
3. Graphic Arts (Screen printing, t-shirt design, 3D printing, Photoshop, Illustrator, Wacom Tablets, and more)
4. Painting & Drawing (sketching, acrylic painting, still lifes, public mural projects, color theory, design, and mixology)

Join CLE|LEAD at NewBridge and spend this school year developing and improving your skills 3 days a week after school. Set yourself up to make money, think for yourself, and be a part of a positive community. Not only will you have fun, but if you finish out the year you’ll be eligible for a scholarship to the Cleveland Institute of Art’s Pre-College Program. CLE Lead also provides bus tickets and snacks. Also, did we mention that this program is free?

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Students

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These are all students served in our adult programming, youth programming, and professional development programs.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Expedite and maximize impact by informing relevant policy advocacy with grassroots service delivery experience
Enable powerful, self-interested partnerships in addition to relying on philanthropy as a basis for funding
Create emotional connections and create long-term supporters to create stronger communities of support and inspire viral marketing
Help peers succeed instead of viewing them as competition in order to more quickly advance the field and catalyze impact
Be dynamic and innovate according to changing circumstances and external cues in order to sustain impact
Distribute leadership across the organization and throughout networks; build enduring leadership teams for continuity

We will use our Strategic Plan to maximize the impact within our neighborhoods and communities

How NewBridge’s youth programs accomplish the organization’s mission
SEL Youth Programs:
CLE|LEAD-Six-month SEL Leadership Development Program SEL education, reinforced through arts-infused curriculum; Six-week leadership training Paid job experience; and Students return as peer mentors to lead activities and support Teaching Artists Fosters positive community and learning at NewBridge and school

Customizable SEL Programs-; Train the Trainer Programs

Dashboard are created and used in management meetings and Board Meetings.

Progess is being made to accomplish goals.

Continue progressing to goal and reporting progress to Board

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.)

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

CLEVELAND CENTER FOR ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

CLEVELAND CENTER FOR ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY

Board of directors
as of 03/27/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Jason Drake


Board co-chair

Mr. Stephen Caviness

Rick Wilmot

1848 Ventures

David Legeay (past chair)

Hawthorn PNC

Jeff Vlasek

BakerHostetler

Bill Strickland (ex-officio)

Manchester Bidwell Corporation

Jason Drake (chair)

Dan T. Moore Co

Richard Gibson

Elizabeth Baptist Church

Ron Goldfarb

Goldfarb Weber Creative

Oliver Henkel(ex-officio)

Cleveland Clinic (Retired)

Robbin Hudson

United Black Fund

Grafton Nunes

Cleveland Institute of Art

Kim Shelnick

University Hospitals

Dawm Wojnarowski

Key Bank

Jason Smith

Cleveland Metropolitan School District

Greg Sanker

Huntington National Bank

Dave Lupyan

Lupyan & Associates

Stephen Caviness (vice chair)

Team NEO

Roger Frank (secretary)

Little Jacket

Laritsa Ortiz

Eaton Corporation

Anne Nelson

Cleveland State University

Heather Frutig

Frutig & Associates

John Gilbert (treasurer)

Key Bank

Michael Adkins

Retirred (Swagelok)

Samantha Holmes

City of Cleveland

Jason Tidmore, Sr.

Cleveland Metropolitan School District

Jennifer Gaglione

PPLS LLC

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/27/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/27/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.