Victims First Inc

Chino Hills, CA   |  https://www.victimsfirst.org

Mission

The mission of VictimsFirst is to support, empower, and protect victims of mass casualty crime through rapid response, financial assistance, community preparedness education, as well as care support and advocacy for policies that help all victims/survivors.

Ruling year info

2022

President

Anita Busch

Vice President

Dr. Zachary Blair

Main address

4195 Chino Hills Pkwy Ste 593

Chino Hills, CA 91709 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

32-0656956

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We aim to change the disorganization and chaos that happens in the immediate aftermath of a mass shooting/mass casualty crime when communities have no plan to coordinate efforts and do not know how to streamline in the best interest of victims. What happens now is a lack of structure which then re-victimizes and re-traumatizes those most directly impacted. We also aim to make sure that donor intent is fully realized and completely transparent and a centralized, straight-to-Victims Fund is always established for the benefit of victims.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Victims Fund: Emergency Financial Assistance for Victims of Mass Casualty Crime

VictimsFirst can provide victims of mass casualty crime with emergency financial assistance. Emergency financial assistance is currently limited to $2,500.00 per person and is based on the availability of funds in our general victims fund. Housing, transportation, food, medical expenses, and other emergency needs are typically covered by our emergency financial assistance program.

Population(s) Served
Victims of disaster
Victims of crime and abuse

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of mass casualty crime victims who have received emergency financial assistance.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Victims of crime and abuse, Victims of disaster

Related Program

Victims Fund: Emergency Financial Assistance for Victims of Mass Casualty Crime

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In our first operational period, we were able to help 17 victims of mass casualty crime with direct emergency financial assistance.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

One goal is to continue to be the go-to nonprofit and network for cities when a mass shooting/mass casualty crime occurs. Another goal is to always be on the ground helping communities to coordinate and organize in the best interest of the mass casualty crime victim base. (There is currently no other organization in the country that does what we do. We have first-hand experiences of living through mass shootings). Another goal is to support victims of mass casualty crime with a full continuum of care. Lastly, to advocate for victims’ rights in every situation where their rights are trampled upon or they are used and exploited by others. To achieve justice. Finally, to fully end the exploitation of victims and survivors of mass casualty crime.

We are slowly and methodically partnering with other like-minded organizations in order to improve the quality of life for mass casualty crime victims. We are leading discussions across the country, including to national nonprofit networks, to educate others to respond more efficiently and with an understanding of the unique issues that face high-profile mass casualty crime victims. We are speaking to more and more District Attorney’s offices across the country and becoming better known through law enforcement agencies. We plan to start peer-to-peer support groups as the network of survivors, unfortunately continues to grow.

Because the majority of everyone involved with us has had a family member murdered, catastrophically wounded, wounded, injured or survived a mass casualty crime, we have a perspective that is incredibly valuable for communities. We know what has helped and what re-traumatizes. We are knowledgeable. We are trusted. We are agile and can respond quickly and with a wealth of information that communities are hungry to learn. We have incredible contacts that has come from years of working in different careers and they all complement each other.

We have responded behind the scenes to 37 mass shootings in the past 10 years. Since deciding to become a nonprofit, we have already responded in such cities as Atlanta, Boulder, Indianapolis, Oconomowoc, Albertville, Collierville, Buffalo, Uvalde and Highland Park. Our work is lauded by City officials and by victims of mass casualty crimes alike. We are sought out by politicians, other nonprofits and called by victims for assistance. We have been invited to be part of the national conversation several times, and are sought out now by the media as mass violence experts.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Victims of mass casualty crime.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We have updated our intake for to provide easier access and clearer instructions; we have translated our victims services resources in multiple languages to better serve victims of mass casualty crime (as needed); and we have added bilingual (Spanish) support to our programs.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our board, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Our relationships with the people we serve have benefitted by providing increased trust, particularly when suggestions are implemented immediately to improve our programs.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Victims First Inc

Board of directors
as of 07/13/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Anita Busch

Victims First, Inc.

Term: 2021 - 2023

Zachary Blair

Victims First, Inc.

David Bilu

Victims First, Inc.

Javier Nava

Victims First, Inc.

Mary Bean

Victims First, Inc.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Not applicable
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/13/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Non-binary
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/13/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.