AMERICAN SPECIAL HOCKEY ASSOCIATION

#BecauseOfHockey

aka ASHA   |   Binghamton, NY   |  www.specialhockey.org

Mission

The American Special Hockey Association (ASHA) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to serving those with intellectual, developmental and physical disabilities through the sport of hockey. ASHA provides an environment of learning, mutual respect and a sense of community to thousands of players and families across the United States of America.

Notes from the nonprofit

Thank you for your support of the American Special Hockey Association.

Ruling year info

2007

Executive Director

Mrs. Jennifer O'Brien

President, Board of Directors

Mr. Peter Robinson

Main address

37 Kenilworth Road

Binghamton, NY 13903 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

33-1111482

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (N01)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (W01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The American Special Hockey Association (ASHA) supports the growth and sustainability of sport of special hockey in the United States. We deliver specialized support and services to our member clubs so they may effectively provide exceptional hockey programming for individuals with intellectual, developmental and physical disabilities. Our Association believes that special hockey is more than just a game, or simply time spent on the ice. Participation in special hockey provides unique opportunities for individuals to gain self-advocacy, build self-reliance & independence, increase concentration, expand capacity to work with others, and improve personal accountability. With ASHA’s support and encouragement, our member clubs provide supportive programs, trained coaches and volunteers, peer inclusion, and family involvement. ASHA advocates for the sport of special hockey to engage communities both inside and outside the arena with the game of hockey in a positive and meaningful manner.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

American Special Hockey Association

The American Special Hockey Association  serves over 100 special/adaptive hockey organizations by delivering effective support, programs and training to meet the special and diverse needs of our members.

Special hockey serves individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities through the sport of hockey.  Our mission engages families and communities by including all abilities in the game.

ASHA Provides:
Specialized training & support for adaptive recreation.
Guidelines for game play, player ratings and best practices.
Access to dozens of ASHA sanctioned events.
Insurance  Coverage.
Website & online registration with compliant background & abuse training.
Personalized brochures and awareness campaigns.
New program grants and equipment support
Scholarships recognizing junior coaches and individuals going to college university or trade school
Fiscal support through grants, grant writing and general grant administration
Resources and referrals regarding not–for-profit governance and best practices
Access to partnerships for group discounts on equipment or merchandise

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

National Hockey League, Partnership 2019

Bauer Hockey, Partnership 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of organizational partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, People with intellectual disabilities, People with physical disabilities

Related Program

American Special Hockey Association

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The American Special Hockey Association actively seeks to increase meaningful partnerships to better serve our community.

Number of hours of training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Related Program

American Special Hockey Association

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

ASAHA responsively provides training to our member organizations to better serve in our communities. We offered Six online training Coaches Corners training in the 2019/2020.

Number of programs documented

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

ASHA has over 100 registered member organizations. Additionally , we directly served additional organizations who are developing or out of area.

Number of stakeholders/stakeholder groups with whom communication has been achieved and expectations shared

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Related Program

American Special Hockey Association

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our stakeholders include registered members as well as forming organizations and out of area organizations.

Number of stakeholders/stakeholder groups identified

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Related Program

American Special Hockey Association

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of stakeholders or stakeholder groups who agree to engage

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Related Program

American Special Hockey Association

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

ASHA supports our member teams who provide hockey for individuals with intellectual, development and physical disabilities. Participation and inclusion on the ice, and not from behind the glass, gives players the opportunity to be involved and learn life lessons to development both physical and emotional skills. ASHA supports its members as they go beyond adapting the game to fit the player, we support the growth in the sport of hockey. The results benefit social, emotional, behavioral, cognitive, and athletic development. Our specific coach training identifies appropriate skills, drills and safety measures are tailored to the of those we serve. This training and support is crucial to our memberships success as it provides consistency and measurement for success. We also include "Peer Coaching" which junior coaching staff. These typical peers, are essential to our programs. ASHA Special Hockey benefits the lives of all of those involved.

The American Special Hockey Association has developed unique, specialized and innovative programs that are turn-key ready for implementation.
These programs include:
Specialized training for coaches and peer mentors. This training is reviewed by Physical Therapists, Occupational Therapists, Adaptive Physical Education Professionals, Behavioral Therapists and Special Education Administrators.
Specialized support for semi-pro and professional teams which to volunteer or engage with our teams, player and community.
Specialized community integration activities which promote the sport of hockey for everyone.
We are committed to leading the adaptive sports opportunities in our nation in our dedication to the care, safety and quality of our programs. We have the tools, knowledge and self-confidence they need to succeed in today's challenging world.

ASHA supports its members as they go beyond adapting the game to fit the player, we support the growth of the player and those involved to participate fully in the sport of hockey. The results benefit the players' social, emotional, behavioral, cognitive, and athletic development while making each individual more independent, self-reliant, and a better citizen.

ASHA embraces the opportunity and responsibility to educate and engage our communities to expand their knowledge, awareness, and understanding of the abilities of individuals with developmental disabilities.

Our unique coach training which identifies appropriate skills, drills and safety measures. This training and support is crucial to our memberships success by providing a national consistency and measurement for program success. We also include "Peer Coaching" which junior coaching staff. These typical peers, are essential to the inclusivity of our program.

Of the many sports and recreational opportunities available, hockey is unique. Both on and off the ice, hockey players and fans are a community. Making the sport accessible, involves adaptations and accommodations that go beyond the typical playing field. The equipment is specialized as are the venues in which the game is played.

ASHA was formed to support the specialized needs of hockey to achieve inclusion for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (special hockey) . ASHA provides the much needed support for new and existing hockey teams with players diagnosed with a developmental disability (i.e. autism, behavior disorders, brain injury, cerebral palsy, Down Syndrome, fetal alcohol syndrome, intellectual disability, Spina Bifida, etc.)

ASHA is the largest special hockey organization in the world with over 80 member programs in more than 75 cities, serving thousands of athletes across the United States.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    The American Special Hockey Association has actively engaged in growth accessibility in our organization. This also includes non traditional forms of hockey. In response to requests for adaptive hockey, ASHA has worked closely with communities nationwide to increase opportunities for individuals of all abilities to safely experience the sport of hockey in a way that is inclusive of their needs.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Asking for feedback from people we serve has encouraged better communication and relationships. This allows those we serve to have an active role in the outcomes. This positively impacts our ability to allocate resources effectively, make better decisions and support any regulatory requirements with educated decision making.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

AMERICAN SPECIAL HOCKEY ASSOCIATION
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

AMERICAN SPECIAL HOCKEY ASSOCIATION

Board of directors
as of 10/31/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Peter Robinson

Washington Capitals

Term: 2019 - 2023


Board co-chair

Jon Schwartz

Big 10

Term: 2017 - 2023

Jon Schwartz

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Peter Robinson

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John Quill

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Debbie McQuilkin

Abby West Farm

Steve Tofaute

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Dr. Lynne Logan

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Peter Worrell

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John Colombo

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John Stevenson

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Jared Woosley

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Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/30/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/30/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.