INTERNATIONAL FELLOWSHIP OF CHRISTIANS & JEWS

aka IFCJ, The Fellowship   |   Chicago, IL   |  www.ifcj.org

Mission

The International Fellowship of Christians and Jews is the leading non-profit building bridges between Christians and Jews, blessing Israel and the Jewish people around the world with humanitarian care and lifesaving aid. The Fellowship has provided hundreds of millions of dollars to programs helping Jews from the former Soviet Union, India, Ethiopia, and elsewhere resettle in Israel, as well as funding programs that fight poverty in Israel and help impoverished elderly Jews and orphans in the former Soviet Union. In 2019 our Founder, Rabbi Yechiel Eckstein, passed away, and his daughter Yael Eckstein assumed the role of President and CEO. Compensation for the year 2020 reflects the death benefit paid to the rabbi’s spouse, and is listed in our 990 for that year.

Ruling year info

1983

President and CEO

Yael Eckstein

Main address

30 N LaSalle St Suite 4300

Chicago, IL 60602 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

36-3256096

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (X01)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (X12)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (Q12)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The International Fellowship of Christians and Jews seeks to provide basic needs like food, heat, medicine, and security to Israelis and Jews in need around the world; to provide the opportunity for Jews living in poverty and threatened by anti-Semitism with the opportunity to find a better life in Israel by making aliyah (immigrating to Israel); to provide immediate and effective humanitarian response to those in need in times of emergency; and to build bridges between Christians and Jews by fostering dialogue, understanding, and active cooperation on issues of shared concern.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Guardians of Israel

Meeting the needs of Israel's poorest citizens remains a high priority for The Fellowship. Through its Guardians of Israel program, The Fellowship assists hundreds of thousands of impoverished people in Israel with basic needs as they struggle to overcome extreme economic hardship, find jobs, and provide for their families. The Fellowship is actively involved in 200 Israeli cities providing food, clothing, shelter, medical care, emergency funds, and other resources to those in desperate need. With more than 20 percent of Israel’s total population, including one in three children, living below the poverty line, and the Israeli government unable to provide for many of its poorest citizens, this assistance is absolutely essential. Through Guardians of Israel, The Fellowship also provides for Israel’s security needs.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims and oppressed people

Assists needy Jews in making aliyah (immigrating to Israel) from 25 countries from all over the world including the former Soviet Union, Argentina, France and elsewhere – to escape rising anti-Semitism, violent conflict and extreme poverty, and to realize the dream of living in their historic homeland. When they arrive in Israel, On Wings of Eagles provides them with klitah (resettlement) assistance in the form of temporary housing, job training, and financial assistance, to help them become full, productive citizens of their new home.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants
Jewish people

Throughout the former Soviet Union, tens of thousands of elderly Jews, orphans, and other desperately poor people struggle to survive. Survivors of both the Holocaust and years of Communist rule today still battle hunger, illness, and brutal cold. In war-torn Ukraine, the problem is compounded by continuous fighting between Ukrainian forces and Russian separatists. Many innocent civilians have been displaced and have lost everything they had. Working with partner organizations and local Jewish communities, The Fellowship’s Isaiah 58 program provides these suffering people with essentials like heating fuel, food, medicine, shelter, and companionship, and helps improve their living conditions. Isaiah 58 also rescues orphaned and abandoned Jewish children from the streets, and provides them with homes where they receive the support and love they need to succeed.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims and oppressed people

Through the Stand for Israel website, social media presence, and daily emails, Stand for Israel keeps people informed about events affecting Israel, the Middle East, and the US-Israel relationship, and trains them to become active, engaged supporters of Israel, working both spiritually and politically on behalf of the Jewish state and the Jewish people.

Population(s) Served
Jewish people

Where we work

Accreditations

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance 2021

Awards

One of the Top 50 NonProfits to Work For 2011 2011

The NonProfit Times

One of the Best NonProfits to Work For 2021

The NonProfit Times

NonProfit Organization of the Year 2021

ANA NonProfit Association

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total dollar amount of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Mission Services (allocations and disbursements)

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The Fellowship helped more than 2 million people in 2020 by providing basic needs to 1.3 million people, providing security to 800,000 people, and helping 4,000 Jews return to Israel.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Poverty: For a developed country, Israel has a very high poverty rate. According to Israel’s National Insurance Institute recent studies, 21.2% of the Israeli population lives in poverty, including almost 1 in 3 children. The elderly are also particularly vulnerable: among them, an estimated 1 in 4 Holocaust survivors live in poverty. Poverty in the former Soviet Union is likewise a serious problem, and Jews who live in rural areas – particularly those who are elderly and unable to take care of themselves – are among the ones who suffer most.
The need for security: As the world sees an alarming spike in anti-Semitism, Jews and Jewish institutions around the globe are at risk of attack. In Israel, the threat of terrorism and war is ever-present, particularly for Israelis who live near the borders of Gaza and Lebanon.
The need for aliyah: Many Jews around the world long to make aliyah (immigrate to Israel) in order to escape poverty and anti-Semitism, start a new life, and fulfill their dream of living in their ancestral homeland, but they lack the means to do so.
The need to build bridges of understanding: For millennia, the relationship between Christians and Jews has been characterized by misunderstanding and animosity. The Fellowship fosters cooperation and understanding between members of these two great faiths by teaching Christians the Jewish origins of their faith, educating Christians on Jewish faith and life, and bringing Christians and Jews together to support humanitarian causes in Israel and the former Soviet Union.

- Grow our support and contributions by increasing our reach and impact through efficient and effective fundraising efforts
- Expand through development and cultivation of new geographic markets and new innovative programs
- Optimize and strengthen the implementation of our programs through key partnerships to effectively address the needs in key program areas
- Stay focused on our core mission of alleviating poverty, providing security, facilitating aliyah (immigration to Israel) and klitah (resettlement), and bridge building
- Unite as a global organization, creating efficiency and operational excellence

Along with our programs of direct assistance, since its founding in 1983 The Fellowship has established longstanding working relationships with other NGOs and Israeli governmental agencies that have built a reliable and durable infrastructure to distribute aid in Israel. Our wide network of partners and volunteers allows us to deliver aid efficiently and effectively to those who need it most. As the largest provider of humanitarian aid in Israel, The Fellowship is a trusted non-profit with decades of experience supporting the nation’s infrastructure and needy population segments.

Since our founding in 1983, The Fellowship has raised more than $2 billion to help Israel and her people. Today, The Fellowship provides humanitarian aid – essentials like food, medicine, and heating – to more than 1.7 million people in need worldwide each year, including the elderly, Holocaust survivors, children, and victims of terror. The Fellowship’s support of aliyah (immigration to Israel) has enabled more than 750,000 Jews to immigrate to and establish successful lives in the Holy Land. Thousands more are helped through dozens of security projects funded by The Fellowship around the world. Many of the poorest Jewish families in the world live in the nations of the former Soviet Union and small Jewish communities worldwide, where The Fellowship helps more than 230,000 of these people by providing vital food and supplies each year.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    • The Fellowship serves all of the citizens of Israel and Jews around the world. • The Fellowship's programs in the field of poverty and social welfare serve Israel's neediest citizens and needy Jews in the former Soviet Union. • The Fellowship's programs in the field of aliyah (immigration) and klitah (absorption) serves olim (immigrants) from 44 countries. • The Fellowship's programs in the field of emergency and security serve all of the citizens of Israel.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To inform the development of new programs/projects, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Following feedback from beneficiaries and caretakers of beneficiaries of the With Dignity and Fellowship program, the amount of monthly food support to the needy elderly beneficiaries was raised by 50%.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    The Fellowship receives feedback from partner organizations and adjusts its services accordingly. An example is the provision of Teff flour to needy elderly Ethiopian-Israeli beneficiaries of the With Dignity and Fellowship program following this request.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

INTERNATIONAL FELLOWSHIP OF CHRISTIANS & JEWS
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

INTERNATIONAL FELLOWSHIP OF CHRISTIANS & JEWS

Board of directors
as of 12/2/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Bishop Paul Lanier

Suzanne Peyser

Community Volunteer

J. R. Dupell

Community Volunteer

Steven Hefter

Community Volunteer

David Clark

Community Volunteer

Keith Frankel

Community Volunteer

Paul Lanier

Community Volunteer

Ed Frankel

Community Volunteer

Penny Nance

Community Volunteer

Jacob Schimmel

Community Volunteer

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/23/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data