Thrive

When families are strong, kids succeed and communities thrive.

Bozeman, MT   |  www.allthrive.org

Mission

For all children to have the opportunity to grow, succeed, and become valuable members of our community.

Ruling year info

1987

Executive Director

Mrs. Carrie Gilbertson

Main address

400 E Babcock St

Bozeman, MT 59715 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Prevent Child Abuse, Inc.

EIN

36-3501185

NTEE code info

Family Services (P40)

Adult, Child Matching Programs (O30)

Family Services (P40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Thrive's mission is for all children to have the opportunity to grow, succeed, and become valuable members of our community.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Parent Place

Thrive's Parent Place provides programming, information, support and resources to all parents to ensure healthy child growth and development in order to help families thrive.

Programming includes:
- One-on-one parent support
- Dynamite Dads monthly group
- Parenting with Love and Logic (R) classes
- Parents as Teachers (TM) home visiting program
- Gym Day
- Circle of Security, evidence based classes and home visiting
- Resource library
- Parent workshops, Family Fun Nights and other family activities throughout the year

Population(s) Served
Parents
Children and youth

The Partnership Project is a home-visiting program that provides a support network to young families in the Gallatin Valley with children ages 0-5 years of age. This program severs over 400 people each year. The project is a collaboration between Thrive, Gallatin City-County Health Department, and over 20 other community partners. Services are free and plans are individualized to fit the needs of each family.

Services include:
- Identifying and achieving goals for families to become self-sufficient
- Educational advancement
- Job placement assistance
- Assistance finding and paying for high quality child care
- Assistance identifying and applying for community resources
- Answering parenting questions
- Free or low cost mental health services
- Prenatal/breastfeeding support and education
- Child development education
- Free parenting groups and activities that help clients connect with his/her child and his/her community

Population(s) Served
Parents
Infants and toddlers

Girls for a Change empowers girls to embrace their futures, secure in their ability to create and contribute to the world they envision.

Girls involved with this program plan an annual, state-wide summit to inspire other young women, and give them the opportunity to participate in community service and international dialogue.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Women and girls

The CAP mentoring program was established in 1989. The CAP program matches community volunteers in the Bozeman and Big Sky Public Schools with over 600 children grades K-12, annually. These mentors work one-on-one with children to increase academic and social competency and to enhance opportunities for academic challenge. They provide support and encouragement, help students discover and build upon their individual strengths and affirm student's ability to shape their own futures. Mentors are screened, trained and supervised by CAP Coordinators.

CAP was formally place in the National Registry of Evidence Based Programs and Practices as an evidence based program in 2012.

Mentors work with students to:
- Provide academic, social or enrichment support
- Increase class participation, academic performance and attendance

Students with mentors are 50% more likely to graduate high school, and 46% less likely to use drugs than their peers without mentors.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

The Parent Liaison program helps build a strong link between home and school. Parent Liaisons are professionals who facilitate parenting classes, connect parents to community resources and support parent and teacher collaboration. Parent Liaisons partner with parents and schools to set children up for success.

Population(s) Served
Parents
Children and youth

Girls on the Run is an evidence based, international program. Girls on the Run teaches life skills through dynamic interactive lessons and running games. The program culminates with the girls being physically and emotionally prepared to complete a celebratory 5k. The main goal of the program is to unleash confidence through accomplishment while establishing a lifetime appreciation of health and fitness.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Children and youth

Where we work

Awards

Article about our Partnership Project 2015

Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal

Affiliations & memberships

Parents As Teachers Blue Ribbon Affiliate 2019

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of new donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We track all donations through Salesforce CRM.

Total number of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of donors retained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

All donor information, is recorded in Salesforce CRM.

Total dollar amount of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Average number of dollars received per donor

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Children and youth, Families

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This number includes outliers such as large and small donations, and grants.

Number of multi-year grants received

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These grants include federal, state, and private foundation funding.

Number of evaluations conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Each program is evaluated using 360 degree measures including client surveys, staff and partner evaluations, progressive evaluations, and, in some cases, pre- and post- testing.

Total number of children and parents served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of staff members certified in subject area training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

10 PAT with affiliate (Health Department) 3 COS 1 car seat installation expert 4 DECA (Devereaux Early Childhood Assessment) 4 ASQ 4 LSP Number of certifications is 26

Number of youth who have a positive adult role model

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Child Advancement Project (CAP)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of kids with a CAP Mentor. These are school year numbers (2021= 2020 to 2021 school year)

Number of mentors recruited

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Child Advancement Project (CAP)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of CAP Mentors recruited. These are school year numbers (2021= 2020 to 2021 school year). COVID19 had a severe impact on our ability to provide in person mentoring.

Hours of mentoring

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Child Advancement Project (CAP)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

COVID19 had a severe impact on our ability to provide in person mentoring. We had to adapt to virtual during 2020 and 2021.

Number of youth mentored

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Child Advancement Project (CAP)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of in-school resources and services provided to families.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Parent Liaison

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

COVID 19 affected our ability to work with as many families. We had to prioritize families in a way we have not had to in the past.

Number of parents who attended a Thrive parenting class.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Includes data from the Parent Place and Parent Liaison programs. (2021 Includes 2020 to 2021 school year numbers which was severely reduced due to COVID19)

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Thrive works to ensure all children can reach their full potential by creating a support network around them through their families, schools, and the community.

Thrive's programs include the most influential people in children's lives and teach them how to be effective and supportive in their role of stakeholders in the child's success. This is done through prevention based services that aim to reach the child's support network as early as possible in order to provide a comprehensive care continuum for children and families from birth to graduation.

Our proven programs have been developed using evidence-based practices, adapted to meet local community needs, and rigorously and continually evaluated to ensure program efficacy.

For over thirty years, Thrive has been developing and nurturing critical community partnerships built on sharing design, implementation, management, evaluation, financial resources, and responsibilities for programs. This approach, which has the success of the child at its center, results in the highest quality services, maximizes scarce resources, and has a powerful impact on outcomes for children.

As the premiere organization for families in our community, Thrive won the “Best Nonprofit in Bozeman" award for 8 consecutive years.

- Our programming serves 1 in 6 people in Bozeman each year, and that number continues to grow annually in direct proportion to local population increases.
- Our Child Advancement Project achieved evidence-based status 2012 through the National Registry of Evidence Based Programs and Practices.
- Thrive was the recipient of "Best Nonprofit in Bozeman" award for 8 consecutive years.
- Our Partnership Project was featured in the Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences in 2015 as a best practice for home visiting models.
- We recently completed our first ever capital campaign and bought our own building.

Our evidence-based and evidence-informed programs address both common, and uncommon obstacles in raising children who will be confident and resilient as they come into adulthood. Through our five signature programs, we work to supply the tools needed for families to support themselves and each other in raising children who will reach their highest potential. We believe that with this foundation, children will enter the world with the ability to advocate for themselves and effectively solve problems as they arise. After successfully starting programs in two other communities we are assessing our ability to continue these scale up efforts and establish the best model to create a sustainable revenue source for Thrive.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve any child, any family, with any need.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Virtual parenting classes because it eliminates the need for child care and transportation and can be done while folding clothes. Some parents definitely express a need to stay at home but participate in a class and we have responded by offering our classes virtual since the pandemic began.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    When people feel like they are being heard and seen you have a better chance of them engaging with your organization. We try to always be clear in our communications and listen, then clearly communicate back what is possible in terms of change related to that feedback.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Thrive
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Thrive

Board of directors
as of 1/20/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Scott Harris

Zoot Enterprises

Term: 2022 - 2024

Bruce Jacobs

Bruce M. Jacobs, LLC.

Shann Scott

First Interstate Bank

Trish Preheim

Self-Employed

Robin Patterson

Self-Employed

Lauren Brendel

Bozeman Health

Mike Redburn

Retired

Scott Harris

Zoot

Mark Lasswell

Retired

Bailey Evans

Ekam Yoga

Gordon Grissom

Principal

Alex McGee

Pie

Paola Torres

Montana State University

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/19/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/19/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.