GOLD2024

WOMENS RESOURCE CENTER FOR THE GRAND TRAVERSE AREA

Protect, shelter, and empower people impacted by domestic and sexual violence.

aka Women's Resource Center   |   Traverse City, MI   |  www.womensresourcecenter.org

Mission

To protect, shelter and empower people impacted by domestic violence.

Ruling year info

1979

Executive Director

Ms. Juliette Schultz

Main address

720 S Elmwood Ave, Ste 2

Traverse City, MI 49684 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

38-2164580

NTEE code info

Family Violence Shelters and Services (P43)

Other Housing, Shelter N.E.C. (L99)

Women's Rights (R24)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The WRC is a recognized non-profit leader in domestic violence and sexual assault services. We aim to end domestic violence and sexual assault and create safe spaces for help, healing, and hope.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Emergency Services

Advocates are trained in crisis intervention and survivor-centered advocacy. Advocates assess the safety of callers, offer counseling, and walk callers through creating a safety plan. Information and referrals provided by Advocates empower callers to make choices about the next steps.

The WRC 22-bed emergency shelter, Helen's House, provides safety for women and children in immediate, lethal danger. The average length of stay in shelter is 26 days (although clients can stay up to 90 days). Core services found at Helen's House include safety planning, goal planning, counseling, and advocacy for housing, career, medical and mental health. Support groups cover topics like building life skills, seeking safety, recognizing reproductive coercion, fostering wellness, mothering, developing healthy relationships, and surviving trauma. The WRC provides food, toiletries, clothing, and other essentials so that families can have their immediate needs met and begin to heal.

Population(s) Served

The WRC Thrift Shops have been described as “The best-kept secret of Traverse City.” In the last 20+ years, the Thrift Shops have grown from a modest operation to a critical revenue for the WRC’s mission, while at the same time giving back almost $100,000 to community members in need.

Every month, the Thrift Shops give an estimated $8,000 in clothing and household items to members of our community who need them most.

Population(s) Served

Court Advocates provide individual support and safety planning to help survivors through the legal process. They provide feedback to legal personnel on the dynamics of domestic and sexual violence with the goal of enhancing the legal system’s response to survivors involved in the system. They assist survivors who are navigating the Family Court System and provide expert witness testimony for prosecutors. They act as first responders attending to a survivor's need for support and providing crisis intervention, safety planning, and education on legal options.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Families
Women and girls
Men and boys
LGBTQ people

Madeleine’s House is an intermediate housing option that serves as a bridge between our emergency shelter and long-term housing. Survivors receive a variety of free and confidential support services while they are in the program including one on one and group counseling, legal advocacy, assistance with budgeting, childcare and parenting counseling, life skills, and transportation. Madeleine’s House, named in memory of the late Madeleine Thomas, community activist and former Board Member for the WRC, can accommodate 5 adults and 11 children. Madeleine’s House provides a longer-term transitional housing option (6 months to 2 years) to survivors and their children as they transition from crisis to self-sufficiency.

Population(s) Served

The Women's Resource Center's 24/7 hotline is a confidential lifeline for victims in need. Counselors are trained in crisis intervention, safety planning, counseling and legal referrals, and pro-active advocacy to victims, as well as their families, friends, and the community in general.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Women and girls
Heterosexuals
Adults
Children and youth
Women and girls
Heterosexuals
Adults
Children and youth
Women and girls
Heterosexuals
Heterosexuals
Adults
Children and youth
Women and girls
Heterosexuals

The Recover and Rebuild Domestic Violence curriculum by author Stacie Fruedenberg is an easy-to-use workbook full of healing exercises and journaling prompts to empower survivors of abusive relationships. The self-guided approach offers critical thinking, coping skills, and other proven tools to help you strengthen and rebuild from domestic violence—and move forward into a new stage of life.

Population(s) Served

The WRC delivers training and presentations on domestic and sexual violence awareness and prevention to criminal justice professionals, students, clergy, corporations, and other professionals.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

It is our goal to provide survivors of violence and their children with a peaceful, safe place to heal and receive the resources needed to be self-sufficient and live a life free from violence.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

WOMENS RESOURCE CENTER FOR THE GRAND TRAVERSE AREA
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

WOMENS RESOURCE CENTER FOR THE GRAND TRAVERSE AREA

Board of directors
as of 01/17/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ruth Bloomer

Retired

Term: 2024 - 2026

Juliette Schultz

Jane Hayes

Ruth Bloomer

Chair

Pat Livingston

Amy Peterson

Secretary

Doug Fierberg

Ann Bollinger

Jim Thornburg

Brooke Borgeson-Gray

Jan Tuohy

Lori Vega

Debra Coburn

Sue Kensington

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/17/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/26/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.