Healing Together

Cultivating collective resilience from the inside out

aka Gratitude Alliance   |   Oakland, CA   |  www.wearehealingtogether.org

Mission

We unlock the power of everyday people to build resilient communities and break cycles of trauma and violence, through peer-led, trauma-informed mental health training, advocacy, and support circles.

Ruling year info

2012

CEO & Co-Founder

Amy E Paulson MS

Main address

5111 Telegraph Avenue #310

Oakland, CA 94609 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

The Gracias Foundation

EIN

45-4315806

NTEE code info

Community Improvement, Capacity Building N.E.C. (S99)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (F01)

Other Mental Health, Crisis Intervention N.E.C. (F99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The statistics are dismal: 1 billion children globally experience violence; 1 in 3 women experiences abuse; a child with multiple traumas has a reduced life expectancy of 20 years; and the cost of global violence is $14 trillion per year (WHO, IEP, and other). We can’t ignore the impact of unhealed trauma and violence in our world today. Hurt people, hurt people - at the individual, community, and global level, breeding fear, hate, injustice and an endless loop where trauma and harm transfer from person to person, community to community, and generation to generation. Yet the current model for healing trauma is based on a broken mental health system. It favors a 1:1 approach with clients that centers outsiders as experts, stigmatizes survivors, and medicates symptoms rather than healing root causes. It is neither scalable, affordable, nor adaptable to cultures around the world and falls woefully short of addressing the growing need for resources - both globally and in the US.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Global Healing Hubs

This program builds the capacity of everyday local leaders to support trauma survivors in their communities to heal.

Our Hubs are located in Central Asia (Nepal), East Africa (Uganda), and the Bay Area, California (USA).

Population(s) Served
Caregivers
People with psychosocial disabilities
Ethnic and racial groups
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims and oppressed people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of community members trained in peer-led, trauma-informed mental health support

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, People with psychosocial disabilities, Economically disadvantaged people, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

Global Healing Hubs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Percentage of training participants who increase knowledge and skills about trauma-informed care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, People with psychosocial disabilities, Economically disadvantaged people, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

Global Healing Hubs

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Based on participants who completed both pre- and post-training surveys

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our model is a bold reimagining of community mental health and healing.

We democratize access by building the capacity of locals to heal themselves and others. We de-stigmatize trauma by acknowledging that every human is impacted by it. Our train-the-trainer approach centers survivors as experts, equipping them with knowledge and skills to identify trauma, provide peer support, and embrace cultural healing traditions, so they can heal trauma and teach others to do the same.

We train teachers, health workers, caregivers, faith leaders, and other local stakeholders in trauma-informed and healing-centered care.

Our training is comprehensive, easily understandable, culturally adaptable, and replicable, weaving together the neuroscience of trauma with practical tools to 1) heal their own trauma, 2) support survivors, 3) rehabilitate aggressors, 4) break stigma, and 5) teach others about mental health and healing.

In short, our approach offers a scalable way to address the global need for mental health resources in a manner that is cost-effective, culturally-relevant, and sustainable.

Our strategic plan is to:

1) Scale local mental health training, advocacy, and support by launching Healing Hubs in major geographic regions of the world
2) Broaden global access to resources through virtual, asynchronous trainings with multiple language options
3) Build a global movement for healing that breaks stigma and builds awareness through podcasts, art exhibitions, media events, and local community engagement

A diverse, inclusive, and representative team is the only way to build safety and trust in communities disproportionately impacted by trauma - i.e. people of color, LGBTQ, immigrants, and survivors of interpersonal and systemic violence and abuse. Our growing team of local facilitators around the world are educators, artists, activists, and health workers who don’t just serve the community - we are the community.

Our workshops combine the neuroscience of trauma with the art of healing through mindfulness, somatic (body based) tools, and expressive arts so participants can reclaim their inner strength, agency, and ability to heal themselves and others.

To date, we’ve trained over 7,000 leaders from 700+ organizations, representing 28 countries, impacting over 100,000 trauma survivors globally.

98% reported that they are now better equipped to heal themselves and support survivors. Graduates have since launched healing groups for youth, survivors of violence, elders, and aggressors of harm. Some graduates have started mental health NGOs, while others started graduate counseling programs.

The following testimonials offer examples of the power of our work to catalyze transformative change:

“The children are now more empathetic, they know how to heal their sad emotions, they share their stories, and they act with love. I’d be a different person if I had this training when I was a teenager.”
- Teacher, Nepal

"Having attended a wealth of trainings and workshops, I have to say, with hand on my heart, this has to be
one of the best."
- Founder of domestic violence support organization, Wales, UK

"What an impressive mind and heart blowing / loving experience. Thanks for all the collaborative effort that
supported my breakthroughs."
- Neurobiologist, USA

“The training of our social workers helped them not only improve their healing services for survivors but also build their capacities in their profession as healers. And survivors who are subjected to the ingredients of the training find themselves on their path to healing. The approach is a key tool we use to have all the women and girls start a new journey which result[s] into self-esteem and confidence, blossoming and love, and hope - after the release of their trauma - and vision for their future. It's one of the best program[s] I have experienced for trauma.”
- Director of leadership center for sexual violence survivors in DR Congo

"Two weeks ago we were in a workshop and one participant shared her story. All of a sudden, almost everyone started crying in the workshop. I was so terrified... then I remembered the activity you did with us... I led the participants into that, and guess what, it really worked. Everyone started smiling and laughing again. Now I feel confident that even though I would get emotional [facilitating our workshops] myself, I am able to lead both myself and the participants out of the emotional situation.”
- Leadership workshop facilitator, Rwanda

“Before, when a woman would come to the police station crying, to report her husband beating her, I would yell and tell her to leave and not come back until she was finished crying. Now, I know how to help her breathe, or give her water, or ask someone else to help her become calm and safe. She will be able to make a better report when she is calm.”
- Police officer, Uganda

More about here impact here: https://www.wearehealingtogether.org/impact

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We primarily serve communities impacted by interpersonal and systemic oppression and injustice

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We are constantly adapting curricula for each workshop based on feedback received from the last workshops. This iterative process take place in all of our locations.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Nuance of what is healing differs for each person; self disclosure of symptoms is a challenge,

Financials

Healing Together
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Healing Together

Board of directors
as of 09/21/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Zeenath Khan

eBay International

Term: 2018 -

Zeenath Khan, PCC

eBay International

Andrew Hughes, CPA (inactive)

Self Employed

Teal Brown Zimring, MPP

Galvanize Partners

Janine Buerger

eBay International

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/21/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islanders/Asian
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/21/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.