High Desert Food & Farm Alliance

Everyone deserves good food.

aka HDFFA   |   BEND, OR   |  https://hdffa.org/

Mission

To support a healthy and thriving food and farm network in Central Oregon through education, collaboration and inclusivity.

Ruling year info

2012

Executive Director

Katrina Van Dis

Main address

PO BOX 1782

BEND, OR 97709 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Katrina Van Dis

EIN

45-4422108

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (K01)

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

Agricultural Programs (K20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Over 39,000 Central Oregonians are food insecure, meaning they don't have acccess to a sufficient and affordable amount of nutrious food, and small to mid-sized family farmers and ranchers who are providing food for our community lack sufficient resources to adequately grow, harvest, distribute, transport and market their food to consumers.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Veggie Rx

VeggieRx is a fresh produce prescription program that improves healthy eating habits for individuals experiencing food insecurity and diagnosed with diet-modifiable disease (such as obesity, heart disease and diabetes). Participants receive fresh vegetables and fruits, nutrition education, and one-on-one support from HDFFA Registered Dietitian-Nutritionist. We partner with over 50 health care practitioners to refer patients to the program.

All of the produce we provide is sourced from Central Oregon farmers, 85% from HDFFA Partners. Since the program began in 2018, we have invested $49,142 into the pockets of farmers with a total impact of $85,507 on the local economy.

In 2021, we are partnering with St. Charles and the Oregon Veterans Health Association to bring VeggieRx to more Central Oregonians. That’s over 9,500 meals to 100+ families.

Population(s) Served
People with diseases and illnesses
Economically disadvantaged people
Veterans
Adults

Grow & Give is a fresh food drive that allows farmers, gardeners, and community members to donate fresh produce, and is the only program of its kind in Central Oregon.

HDFFA believes that everyone deserves good food. There are over 39,000 Central Oregonians who face food insecurity on a daily basis. Since 2016, we have collected over 90,500 lbs. of food, the equivalent of 75,396 meals. All the food is provided to the regional food bank, NeighborImpact, and delivered to their 50+ hunger relief agencies.

Food from Grow & Give is used in our Fresh Harvest Kits, ready-to-cook meal kits containing pantry staple items (e.g. pasta or stew), farm fresh vegetables, a spice bag, and a comprehensive recipe card for creating a nutritious and delicious meal for families. Kits are distributed on a weekly basis in three communities. Since, 2019 we have provided 2,456 Kits with 5,569 lbs of food, which provided over 9,500 meals.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Families
Children and youth

Food and community are the heart of our mission. We work in concert with Central Oregon farms, businesses and organizations to implement projects, initiatives, networking events and conferences to create a more healthy and vibrant food and farm community. By working with our partners, we increase the success of our projects and decrease duplication of resources.

HDFFA partners with a number of organizations, including the OSU Extension Small Farms Program and Oregon Department of Agriculture, to coordinate workshops and hands-on training opportunities for farmers and ranchers to sharpen their skills on everything from crop planning to marketing strategies to food safety.

With support from public grants, we have provided over $51,000 to farmers for greenhouse infrastructure improvements, and in 2021-22 will provide $40,000 additional funds through the American Resue Plan to improve on-farm and ranch efficiencies.

Population(s) Served
Farmers
Adults
Social and economic status
Ethnic and racial groups

The Food & Farm Directory is comprised of HDFFA Partners from farmers and ranchers to sauce makers, restaurants and grocery stores. Together with our Partners, we strive to provide clear and accurate information about locally grown, raised and crafted foods and where to find them. In the spirit of transparency and information accuracy, all of our Partners agree to local food guidelines.

HDFFA is founded on the Belief that local food should be accessible to everyone, and that our food connects us to each other.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of food donation partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Farmers

Related Program

Fresh food donation (Grow & Give)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of farmers donating fresh local foods.

Total pounds of food rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status

Related Program

Fresh food donation (Grow & Give)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of pounds of fresh local food collected and donated to the regional food bank.

Number of dollars of private and public sector investments in agriculture attributable to the organization's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Farmers, Social and economic status

Related Program

Agricultural Support

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Public and private funds invested and infused into the Central Oregon Agriculture.

Number of farmers who sold to an organization as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Farmers, Social and economic status

Related Program

Veggie Rx

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of farmers selling fresh food for VeggieRx.

Estimated dollar value of food donations distributed to community feedings programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status, Adults, Family relationships

Related Program

Fresh food donation (Grow & Give)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Estimated dollar value based upon Feeding America (1.2 lbs = 1 meal = $1)

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Priority 1: Financial stability to support planned growth and long-term success.
Priority 2: An equitable, diverse and inclusive organization and food system.
Priority 3: A healthy, thriving farm and food network.

1. Diversify our funding streams.
2. Strengthen outreach to the broader tri-county community to expand awareness and increase support.
3. Establish a tiered investment portfolio.
4. Increase leadership and representation of under- represented populations in the organization (board, committees, and staff).
5. Educate the public about our region's food system, including appropriate outreach to ensure food security for all.
6. Create a more holistic approach to food access by increasing cross-sector collaboration.
7. Support ongoing efforts to create a regional food system.

HDFFA maintains a staff that oversees our four core programs: Grow & Give, VeggieRx, Agricultural Support and Food & Farm Directory. Our Executive Director works with staff to maintain relationships and outreach to beneficiaries, donors and sponsors as well as grant writing to public and private partners to ensure financial stability of the organization. Staff evaluate programs annually using process and outcome based measures and qualitative and quantitative metrics. Staff continue to evaluate programs with an equity lens through surveys and one on one interactions.

The staff oversee (with one board member) the Farm and Ranch Advisory Committee that provides a feedback loop from program beneficiaries, and are devloping a Food Security Committee.

The Board of Directors oversees the Executive, Fundraising and Finance Committees.

In 2020, we accomplished the following.

1) 13,425 lbs of fresh food collected and donated to the regional food bank, an equivalent of 11,000 meals
2) Offered our fresh produce prescription program, VeggieRx, in Bend, Redmond and Prineville with 188 participants and 479 impacted overall.
3) Provided 775 Fresh Harvest Kits (pantry staple items, farm fresh food, recipes, spices and bags) to local area hunger relief agencies increasing availability of fresh produce by 1,871 lbs to community members.
4) Invested over $25,000 in local farms through our Agriculture Support Programs.
5) Distributed our 9th Annual Food & Farm Directory as part of our regional marketing campaign to foster relationships between agriculture producers, farmers’ markets, local restaurants, institutions, grocers and consumers to 27,000 households.
6) Purchased $22,000 direct from farmers for VeggieRx.
7) Secured $12,500 in grant funds to reimburse farms for donations, offsetting COVID-related lost sales.
8) Develop a 3-year strategic plan with an associated tactical annual work plan for staff and board
9) Secured funding to improve our internal diversity, equity and inclusion policies and procedures

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    In general, we serve Central Oregon residents by improving access to locally grown, raised and crafted food products Specifically, we work to improve food security for historically marginalized adults and families. We also work with agriclutural producers, many of whom self-identify (or identify through the Farm Census) as socially disadvantaged or limited income.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

High Desert Food & Farm Alliance
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

High Desert Food & Farm Alliance

Board of directors
as of 10/6/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Jeff Fox

Sunlife Farm

Term: 2022 - 2020

Jane Sabin-Davis

Emeritus

Laura Pennevaria

Homestead Family Practice

Amanda Gow

Community at Large

Jeffrey Fox

Sun Life Farm

Tracy Wilson

OSU Extension Service

Lindsay Wengloski

Deschutes Brewery

Jeff Baker

Craft3

Kristine Thomas

Community-at-Large

Michelle Abbey

Public Health

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 09/28/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/28/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.