SILVER2023

Foundations for Leadership

Building Achievement

Vero Beach, FL   |  www.fflmun.org

Mission

Foundations for Leadership is an innovative non-profit organization dedicated to equipping young people for success in education, career, and civic life. With Model UN as a cornerstone, we promote experiential learning that develops a collaborative approach to solving problems. We serve students, teachers, and public school districts throughout Florida.

Ruling year info

2014

Founding Executive Director

Amy Ruggiero

Main address

1275 US Hwy 1 Suite 2 228

Vero Beach, FL 32960 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

46-4533587

NTEE code info

Primary/Elementary Schools (B24)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Leadership Development (W70)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Historically, Model UN tended to attract the participation of students from private and more selective schools. Therefore, Foundations for Leadership set a goal of increasing participants from public school districts across Florida. Model UN is an effective approach to preparing young people for their role in a participatory democracy and as global citizens, and we want to extend its benefits to the widest range of students possible

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Model UN Conferences

More than 1500 students, teachers and volunteers come together annually for an engaging debate on global issues.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Young adults

In partnership with school districts, we offer credited teacher professional development workshops. Teachers have access to FFL program staff for support throughout the entire academic year.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Area colleges and universities partner with FFL to serve Miami-Dade and Pinellas County Schools. Students earn service learning and volunteer credits by giving back to their communities.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Children and youth

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Model UN is a premier vehicle for building young people's problem solving skills and understanding of international affairs and world cultures. Model UN develops literacy and communication, higher order thinking, and not least of all respect for diverse perspectives. Students in Model UN develop a mindset for active citizenry and build lifelong skills that enhance college and work place readiness. The program meets two challenges: improving academic performance and creating engaged citizens.

Historically, Model UN tended to attract the participation of students from private and more selective schools. Therefore, FFL set a goal of increasing participants from public school districts across Florida. Model UN is an effective approach to preparing young people for their role in a participatory democracy and as global citizens, and we want to extend its benefits to the widest range of students possible. We work directly with public school districts to administer programs that meet both student and educator needs. We specifically target:

1) College & Career Preparation. Participants develop skills in research, writing, communication, and collaborative problem solving. MDCPS Social Studies test scores have consistently improved versus other departments. FFL is built on long-term relationships so written teacher and student evaluations tell us that MUN was the single most important activity in preparing for “the real world."

2) Civic mindedness and active citizenship. Participants learn about complex societal issues and understand their role in taking action to solve problems. MUN creates thoughtful leaders, many of whom return to volunteer as a result of personal experience.

3) Awareness of other people, places, ideas - development of diverse perspectives. Model UN prepares young people for their role in a participatory democracy. It is a proven tool in developing critical thinking, communication, and problem solving skills. Through simulations, students increase civic awareness and build informed views on issues affecting communities worldwide. It promotes development of personal ideas and collaboration with people of varying opinions. Young people learn to engage responsibly in decision-making.

4) While we have individual program participants from around the State of Florida, we aim to build more formalized programs with additional school districts.

1) Teacher Professional Development. Our programs tackle requirements for the Florida Civics EOC and we help teachers develop academic simulations on just about any social studies topic. We show teachers how to integrate Model UN into required coursework and help them develop skills and best practices for an interactive learning environment.

2) Online Resources for classroom instruction. Lessons on research, writing, public speaking, Model UN rules of procedure. FFL creates new content each year that corresponds to current world events.

3) Conferences and Events. We plan and implement several annual Model UN conferences and practice simulations. Thanks to generous partnerships, all events take place on local college campuses.

4) Volunteer Program. Volunteers quite literally make our work possible. Hosting a Model UN conference requires an average of 50 volunteers. Depending on the role, they must come with specific knowledge and skill, particularly when leading committee sessions. Thanks to dedicated Model UN teams of area colleges and universities we are able to fill the need. Required volunteer training is provided by FFL to ensure delegates and their teachers experience an educational conference of the highest standard.

The FFL founders have more than 30 years combined experience in program design, implementation, and resource development. A decade of work in Florida has yielded key institutional partners and a solid volunteer base. In fact, our most valuable asset is established, long-term relationships with program stakeholders. These proven relationships are the basis of everything we do, not least of all engaging and retaining the community we serve. In other words, the people we serve know us.

Two major Florida public school districts have entrusted FFL to work directly with teachers and students under their supervision - Pinellas County Schools and the Nation's 4th largest district, Miami-Dade. Critical to retaining these relationships are demonstrated results coupled with the ability to meet changing district needs and educational standards.

We maintain community partnerships by offering programs with shared interests among stakeholders. For example, FFL volunteers are eligible for service learning credit through the MDC Institute for Civic Engagement and UM's Butler Center. Credit is applied toward course requirements and/or volunteer hours. St. Petersburg College offers a similar format whereby students receive course credit for their volunteer service.

We have experienced tremendous program growth and impact over a short time. While we aim to continue the trajectory, there are a two longer-term projects in the works:

1) We are working with Miami-Dade and Pinellas Schools in establishing a framework to articulate what evidence suggests – Model UN students are more likely to attend college, remain engaged in Model UN by becoming volunteers, and upon college graduation are securing jobs in a variety of fields.

2) Model UN is integrated in Miami-Dade Social Sciences curriculum where test scores have steadily improved. We aim to gather more quantitative evidence to demonstrate overall impact on student achievement, college entry rates and performance, civic engagement and employment opportunities.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To assess impact on student achievement and maintain relevancy in standards-based education

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Foundations for Leadership
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Foundations for Leadership

Board of directors
as of 06/21/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Amy Ruggiero

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Not applicable
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/6/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/21/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.