QUADE FOUNDATION

Keeping the Family Together

aka N/A   |   Austin, TX   |  www.quadefoundation.org

Mission

Mission Statement To promote, protect, and preserve a healthy, family relationship between companion animals and their shelters, fosters, and adopters.

Notes from the nonprofit

Quade Foundation has a:
Conflict of Interest Policy
Board of Directors Written Consent Policy
Bylaws
Unanimous Written Consent Policy
Trademark

Ruling year info

2014

President

Catherine M. Bridge

Main address

3005 S. Lamar Blvd. Suite D-109, #406

Austin, TX 78704 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

46-5040115

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Animal Training, Behavior (D61)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (D12)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-PF.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

There are no accurate total numbers for feral, stray, or abandoned dogs and cats (one study estimated that the number of unowned, stray cats in Toronto, Canada was somewhere between 100,000 and 220,000). In the United States, an estimated six to eight million dogs and cats enter shelters each year. Of that number, 40% to 50% are euthanized, the vast majority being cats. Even more disconcerting is the increase in the number of animal hoarders posing as animal rescue operations. Financial strains on shelter operations as well as the economic pressures of dog and cat ownership from an increasing poverty rate and shrinking middle class present exasperating circumstances. These challenges to the health and well-being of both people and companion animals are great in multitude as well as magnitude. The Quade Foundation is cognizant and driven to address the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program assistance for companion animal shelters, fosters, adopters, and owners

Quade Foundation is a Texas non-profit corporation and an IRS 501 (c) (3) dedicated to helping animal shelters, nurture and heal shelter animals, and find companion animals their forever homes.

Quade Foundation assists companion animal shelters, fosters, adopters, and owners to help a shelter maintain or achieve no-kill status, reduce recidivism of adopted animals, and keep companion animals in their forever homes.

Quade Foundation serves the central Texas region and includes the Greater Austin area, which is the 4th-largest city in Texas and the 11th-largest city in the United States.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animal clinics/shelters improved as a direct result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Context Notes

Clinics/shelters include municipal and regional shelter facilities and non-profit private and philanthropic organizations registered with the US Department of the Treasury as an IRS 501 c 3.

Total dollars donated for canine behavior modification and training to enhance adoption

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Context Notes

Training and behavior modification donations and grants go specifically to organizations and programs that strictly adhere to rewards-based methods and techniques of training.

Total dollars donated to provide medical services to companion animals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Context Notes

Medical services include spay/neuter, heartworm treatment, dental, tumor removals, post-adoption medical needs, medical equipment, and other medical expenses outside normal care protocol.

Total dollars donated for shelter operations and capital improvements

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Context Notes

Shelter operations and capital improvements include a wide variety of expenditures including cooling units for kennel areas, expansions, and upkeep/replacement of depreciated capital assets.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our mission statement is to promote, protect, and preserve a healthy, family relationship between companion animals and their shelters, fosters, and adopters. This involves nurturing and healing shelter animals, finding companion animals their “forever homes," and helping municipal and regional animal shelters preserve or obtain their status as a no-kill animal shelter. The Foundation recognizes that the human-animal bond is a mutually beneficial and dynamic relationship between people and animals that is influenced by behaviors considered essential to the health and well-being of both. The bond includes, but is not limited to emotional, psychological, and physical interactions of people, animals, and the environment. The desired outcome is that improved human and companion animal interactions will encourage and promote a more vibrant, desirable, and sustainable central Texas community.

The Foundation's strategy is to:
• Assist shelters in their day-to-day operations,
• Assist shelter clinics so adopters can afford annual vaccinations and unexpected medical expenses,
• Help adopters/owners afford annual vaccinations, unexpected medical expenses, and resolve housing quandaries,
• Provide training and behavior enhancement opportunities for owners and adopted animals,
• Promote educational programs to foster proper nutrition and health, exercise, and communication between companion animals and their owners,
• Advocate programs for microchipping, vaccination, and spay/neuter to stem shelter intake of companion animals and reduce euthanasia of healthy cats and dogs,
• Market adoption of shelter animals and rescued specific breeds, rather than purchasing from a breeder or pet store, and
• Legally extract animals from abusive and neglectful owners.

To maintain and facilitate no-kill shelters requires a multi-faceted approach to the dilemma of overcrowded animal shelters. One is to assist existing shelters in their normal business operations. This not only includes sheltering animals, but assisting programs that benefit the health and well-being of the companion animal, thereby making the dog or cat more adoptable.
Another important facet is to stem the flow of shelter intake, particularly from owners who relinquish (i.e.-surrender) their companion animals. It is reported that 25%-50% of shelter intake in most communities is from owner surrenders. A vast majority of owners thinking of relinquishing their dog were unaware of available intervention programs and services that could solve their dilemma.
Various methods of intervention include assisting adopters (via shelter clinics) with annual vaccinations and unexpected medical expenses, thus preventing the return of a companion animal to the shelter because of economic circumstance. The selection of housing accommodations has become an important factor as legislative and housing restrictions based on the sizes of pets and certain large breeds or breed mixes can affect ownership of large animals.
Promoting educational programs for spay/neuter, good nutrition, vaccination, and proper exercise can enhance the relationships between owners and their companion animals as well as shelters and fosters. Advocacy programs aimed at fostering and adoption, rather than purchasing from a breeder can reduce shelter populations. All can reduce shelter intake and enhance the human-animal bond.
Programs for training and behavior enhancement by qualified and vetted personnel and organizations is readily available to help owners and their adopted animals assimilate for a long and stable family relationship.
Our strategies represent a comprehensive and targeted approach, reflecting a community benefit that is difficult to accurately measure, but enhances the welfare of the community at large.

Quade Foundation provides grants for 501 (c) (3) for:
• Shelter clinics for medical and diagnostic equipment,
• Rescue organizations whose purpose is to rehome pure bred and specific breed companion animals,
• Educational programs with a holistic approach that promotes changes in behaviors toward animals and the human-animal bond,
• Advocacy programs for vaccination, spay/neuter, microchipping, proper nutrition, proper exercise for companion animals, and resolve potential housing issues,
• Behavior and training programs through vetted trainers and organizations,
• Sponsorships for 501 (c) (3) shelter puppies and kittens,
• Programs that promote fostering and adoption of companion animals,
• Encouraging donation and volunteerism to organizations that support companion animals,
• Extraction of neglected and abused animals.

Studies indicate the demographics of owners that relinquish their animals to shelters are diverse and do not fit the stereotype of a “typical" owner-surrender profile that some animal welfare professionals would assume. The data suggests that each community may need to create different types of interventions to be effective in that community to reduce the relinquishment of large dogs. By doing so, interventions can be approached in a targeted manner that is community specific and be effective in intervening the decision-making process before the animal is surrendered to a shelter.
All owners do not relinquish their dogs without thought or care for the dog; most love their animal and seek options, if available, that would allow them to keep their dog. A robust shelter operation that offers comprehensive services and educating the public about the social responsibility of owning a companion animal (good nutrition, proper exercise, spay/neuter, microchipping, vaccination) has a direct impact on the viability and livability of a community. One begets the other, reflecting a moral imperative we embrace.
Our decades of experience in shelter operations, animal rescue, emergency response, marketing, and fundraising has culminated in lifelong relationships with others who share our passion, commitment, and professionalism. Our extensive networking skills, intense vetting procedures, and targeted approach ensures every available resource is distributed to ensure maximum results necessary for the Foundation's successful operation. The Foundation's principles and underlying basis for its programs are based on sound, scientific findings directed towards problem-solving programs that seek to reduce the number of shelter animals that are needlessly euthanized, reduce the number of dogs and cats relinquished by their owners, and promote a vibrant and sustainable urban environment.

Our performance reviews do not occur annually. They happen continuously. We monitor websites and consult with others in the shelter and rescue industry as well as fosters and adopters. The Foundation gauges other non-profit rescue organizations and shelters not only by the number of companion animals saved and method of rescue, but how they find their "forever home." In large part, success is molded by attitude and a calculated approach, not a cookie-cutter technique of 'pulling' animals and warehousing them into situations that fail the animal and, ultimately, the self-proclaimed 'rescue' or 'shelter.'
A key to success is realizing the cause for owner relinquishment, particularly large dogs, and develop interventions to decrease that number. Bully-type dogs are increasing in popularity in the pet owning population and tend to enter many municipal facilities in higher numbers than other breeds, which presents quite a dilemma. The fact that the majority of dogs relinquished are unaltered requires not only effective owner intervention, but shelter clinic support.
The most difficult challenge is always finding better ways to spend dollars that derive the greatest benefit. It's an ongoing challenge that entails constant review and diligence. There are numerous rescues and shelters and the need for funding never wanes. In fact, it seems the need increases as time goes by because of shortcomings in communities' animal health infrastructure, lack of animal control services, poor understanding of the public of what animal and economic health benefits a community derives from animal ownership, and a limited appreciation of the size and diversity of animal populations in a community. The balance of providing service to need is a high-wire act because funding is limited and circumstances are not static.
The current, archaic system of simply euthanizing dogs and cats is not a good reflection on man's obligation to be a good steward of the animal kingdom and environment. Changing perceptions, attitudes, and instituting a framework that considers alternatives other than euthanizing a vulnerable population requires a cultural shift that will not occur in months, years, or decades. It will take generations. In essence, a paradigm shift is required where euthanization is no longer considered the norm in addressing shelter overcrowding and unwanted companion animals.
A response driven focus has been a persistent challenge to managing animals. We recognize that some satisfactory change at the shelter and rescue level has occurred and moving in the right direction, albeit at a pace many would like to see improved. Our desire and scrutiny to deliver maximum results for every dollar spent is ongoing and our funding mechanisms for resourcing companion animal organizations and instituting humane programs reflects not only what we have accomplished, but what more we have to do.

Financials

QUADE FOUNDATION
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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QUADE FOUNDATION

Board of directors
as of 05/31/2018
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Catherine M.

Bridge

Term: 2014 -

John "Bob" Robert Bridge, Sr.

John "Rob" Robert Bridge, Jr.

Mary Lee Bridge

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes