PLATINUM2024

Grow Wild

Conserve - Educate - Inspire

BOZEMAN, MT   |  www.growwildmt.org

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Mission

Grow Wild's mission is to conserve native species, educate the community about invasive species, and inspire stewardship of the land. ​

Notes from the nonprofit

As our organization enters its 20th year serving this community, we have reflected on our past, present, and future and decided to make a change: Gallatin Invasive Species Alliance is becoming Grow Wild. As Grow Wild, we remain fiercely dedicated to healthy and resilient ecosystems throughout the Gallatin Watershed. Yet this is more than a change in name. Our impact and vision have grown year after year, and we are ready to embrace the full scope of our organization’s purpose. The inspiring success of Crail Gardens, our native plant demonstration garden at the Historic Crail Ranch, has reminded us that our purpose is, at its heart, about growth: growing native plants, growing our community of responsible land stewards, and growing our positive impact on the critical habitats that surround us.

Ruling year info

2014

Executive Director

Jennifer Mohler

Main address

903 N BLACK AVE

BOZEMAN, MT 59715 USA

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Formerly known as

Gallatin Big Sky Weed Committee

Gallatin Invasive Species Alliance

EIN

46-5544351

NTEE code info

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Land Resources Conservation (C34)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2022 and 2021.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Noxious Weeds are invasive plant species that are able to establish easily, grow quickly, and spread to the point of disrupting biological communities or ecosystems. Invasive alien species are among the most serious threats to biodiversity, and have a potentially devastating impact on our food security, health and economies. For the past nineteen years, Grow Wild has tackled the unenviable and difficult task of addressing invasive species in an area of unprecedented growth and development. Our commitment to conservation is rooted in veneration for the natural world and fueled by our passion for wildflowers, wildlife, and wild spaces. Join us as we inspire an appreciation for the natural world, educate our community, and implement conservation projects to ensure that the places we love are not destroyed by our pursuit to experience them.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Clean Recreation Program

Recreation leads to invasive species introduction and spread, threatening local trails and rivers. In response, the Grow Wild promotes established clean recreation programs (PlayCleanGo and Clean.Drain.Dry.) via multiple media platforms, trailhead and highway signs, and at events.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

To protect natural resources from invasive species, the Grow Wild works collaboratively with partners and organizations on an array of projects, creates and disseminates educational materials, and provides educational opportunities via local kid’s camps, farmers market, guided hikes, and classes.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

Crail Gardens demonstrates how native plants can be used to conserve water, create wildlife habitat, and preserve our historic landscape. The Grow Wild hosts 2-3 open houses in the summer, educational tours, a Wildflower Festival, and provides materials to inspire the community to Grow Wild!

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Active stewardship by landowners is critical to protect natural resources on both private and public lands. Grow Wild offers free on-site assistance and provides a suite of resources to landowners so they can address invasive species using best management practices and adaptive strategies.

Population(s) Served

Wildlife in our area face habitat loss and degradation due to invasive species introduction and spread. Grow Wild works to mitigate the threat via noxious weed management on bighorn sheep winter range, in the Gallatin Canyon, in HOA open space, and with our community weed pulls.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adults
Adults
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Area of land, in hectares, directly controlled by the organization and under sustainable cultivation or sustainable stewardship

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Landowner Stewardship Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Grow Wild provides free on-site property evaluations for landowners, track the number of site inspections and the acres that represents.

Number of conservation actions at site(s)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Wildlife Habitat Conservation Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Conserve Our Canyon project facilitates invasive plant management at heavily use river access sites, restoration sites, and public lands in the Gallatin Canyon for the benefit of wildlife.

Number of projects showing an upward trend in the number of conservation actions at site

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Wildlife Habitat Conservation Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Cricital winter range of our local bighorn sheep herd has been seriously compromised. For every dollar Grow Wild invests, it is matched by $ x by our partners in noxious weed management.

Number of invasive species removed from managed area(s)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Wildlife Habitat Conservation Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We host community noxious weed pulls to improve wildlife habitat and educate the public. The metrics are pounds of noxious weeds pulled annually. Decreasing lbs over time area good thing!

Total number of species of native plants in the area(s)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Crail Gardens Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We built a demonstration garden at using native plants that are wildlife friendly, water wise, and preserving of the historic landscape. The number of plants added to the garden represent the metric.

Number of individuals applying skills learned through the organization's training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Community Education & Collaboration Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The metrics reflect the number of youth and adults educated about invasive species, clean recreation practices, and land stewardship.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. Educate residents, visitors and youth about invasive species
2. Facilitate ecologically based invasive species management on private and public lands within the Gallatin Watershed through education and collaboration
3. Advocate for healthy native ecosystems to maintain ecological and economic health of the community
4. Promote “clean recreational habits” to interrupt recreational pathways of spread for invasive species.
5. Coordinate invasive species management resources and programs

1. Prevent the introduction of additional invasive species
2. Slow, stop, or reverse the progression of established invasive species
3. Monitor invasive species populations
4. Promote the use of native plants and sustainable landscapes
5. Improve wildlife habitat via invasive species management
6. Assist landowners with land stewardship
7. Inspire the community to adopt conservation practices to ensure that what we love so much about this place is not destroyed by our pursuit to experience it

Our Team: The individuals who serve on the board represent a combined 160 years of involvement and expertise in natural resources, horticulture, and invasive species. Three of which have been involved with the organization since the beginning of our work in 2004.

Our Staff: For over 20 years, our executive director has worked with a diverse group of public, private, and non-profit entities to conserve natural resources by promoting sustainable land management practices. Since she joined the organization, she has developed and grown programs, with 278% growth in income over her tenure.

Our Commitment: We believe our work is essential. Conservation doesn’t just happen. It’s a commitment made by the collective and requires a long-term vision and ongoing investment to yield results.

In 2021, the Alliance accomplished the following:

Clean Recreation Projects:
1. Clean.Drain.Dry.: Initiated in 2017. Partners: GRTF, MT FWP, DNRC and MISC.
- 2,652000 views of Highway 191 billboards
- 1,206,000 impressions of print media
- Over 1500 CDD stickers and educational cards distributed
- 8 educational events and an estimated 1,840 people reached
2. PlayCleanGo: Initiated in 2016. Partners: BSCO, BSOA, GCWD, MNWEC and NAISMA.
- 5,304,000 views of signs in the Gallatin Canyon
- 240,000 trail users reached at 4 BSCO trailheads
- Over 1,500 stickers distributed at events and local businesses
- 30 PCG kits for kids distributed during Ophir School second grade field trip
- 8 educational events and an estimated 1,840 people reached.

Community Education and Events:
1. Adult Education: The Alliance educated 237 people at 5 classes (Master Hunter Class, Realtor Continuing Ed Courses Montana Outdoor Science School)
2. Wildflower & Weed Hikes: Hosted 3 events with 17 hikers.
3. Farmers Market: Hosted a booth at 10 markets, engaging an average of 40 people per night, for a total of 400 per season, reaching an estimated 2,800 people.
4. Youth Education: Educated 201 youth at 6 events - Ophir School field trip, Camp Big Sky, 2 Jack Creek Preserve camp, Flying D Youth Summit and Gallatin Gateway Youth Group.

Environmental Stewardship
1. Bighorn Sheep: 9 years, 8 partners, $141 funds invested, $14,305 matched funds
2. Crail Gardens: Built in 2019. In our first year, 29 volunteers put in 233 hours building 4 gardens and planting nearly 700 wildflowers.
3. Conserve Our Canyon: 317 acres treated, $3,800 funds raised, $16,363 matched funds
4. HOA (Habitat Owners Assoc.): 24 volunteers, 96 volunteer hours, $16,406 value to HOAs
5. Landowner Assistance: 18 properties inspected representing 236 acres.
6. Map/Monitoring: Eliminated leafy spurge at kids fishing pond after 9 years of treatment and monitoring.

Financials

Grow Wild
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Grow Wild

Board of directors
as of 01/30/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

John Councilman

Retired Gallatin National Forest Vegetation Management Specialist (37 years)

Term: 2021 - 2023


Board co-chair

Mike Jones

Assistant Coordinator / Foreman, Gallatin County Weed District

Term: 2021 - 2023

John Councilman

Retired Gallatin National Forest Vegetation Management Specialist (37 years)

Mike Jones

Assistant Coordinator / Foreman, Gallatin County Weed District

Katie Coleman

Administrative Assistant, Hammond Property Management

Don McAndrew

Retired 34 years with the Natural Resource & Conservation Service as an Engineer & Hydrologist

Larry Holzworth

Adjunct Instructor at Montana State University, 37 years with NRCS as the Plant Materials Center Manager and Plant Materials Specialist

Danielle Jones

Gallatin County Weed District Program Assistant

Lorri Lagerbloom

Artist and Horticulturalist, Wild Onion Gardens LLC

Krisy Hammond

Household CEO and Director of Child Development, Volunteer Specialist and Master of Assorted Jobs

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/27/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data