Goat House Farm

Tallahassee, FL   |  http://goathousefarm.com

Mission

Our primary goals are: -To establish standards and communicative strategies for first time goat owners based on scientific best practices and holistic care. -To develop and build community educational programs on goat husbandry and beekeeping centered around compassion, empathy, and environmental awareness. -To improve community wellness through goat-assisted therapeutic services. -To partner with nonprofit organizations in order to align shared missions and services.

Ruling year info

2021

Principal Officer

Melissa Hughes

Main address

17870 Larkin Ct W

Tallahassee, FL 32310 USA

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EIN

47-4025284

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Education

The farm currently offers daily open farm tours to the general public. Day visits are scheduled between 10:00am and 4:00pm in the fall and winter months and until 6:00pm the remainder of the year. During the tours, students, adults, and families learn about raising goats, sustainable practices, goat care, and beekeeping through hands-on interactions. Farm tours are not a petting zoo but are designed so visitors are able to spend time with goats in their pasture in order to promote compassion toward the animals, gain an understanding of sustainable stewardship, and support emotional well-being for visitors and animals. We feel when we cultivate compassion through humane education, we can foster empathy which is critical to the foundation of a just and compassionate society. For this reason, GHF adheres to and advocates for the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals’ Five Freedoms: Freedom from Hunger and Thirst; Freedom from Discomfort; Freedom from Pain, Injury or Disease; Freedom to Express Normal Behavior; and Freedom from Fear and Distress. Currently the farm has an average of six tours per week. We do not charge for this service and do not intend to charge in the future, though we do accept donations. We strive to make this opportunity available to all regardless of income level.
Classes: We began our classes in the fall of 2020. All classes are open to the public and can be scheduled via telephone or on our online scheduling portal.
Milking Classes: We offer a milking class every morning on the farm at 10:00am during milking season. The cost is $20 for a 45 minute class for up to four people. The class includes an overview of the proper and sanitary methods of milking, including by hand and by machine; udder care; feeding of dairy goats; setting up a milkroom from sanitation to stands; and health concerns of dairy goats. We currently give approximately two classes per week.
All About Goats Class: Our All About Goats Class is offered at least four days per week throughout the day at 90 minute intervals. The cost is $40. Participants learn the history of goats; nutritional requirements; herd behavior; shelter needs; fencing and predator prevention; basic grooming, including coat and hoof care; breed recognition and background; how to approach and communicate with the goats; vaccinations; and holistic care. Goat classes began in November of 2020 and to date we have conducted four classes.
What’s the Buzz, All About the Bees Class: Our bee class is offered daily in the warm months when opening the hives does not disrupt the normal environment of our bees. The class is 90 minutes for $50 and includes a small jar of honey. The class includes basic hive care, bee anatomy, queen identification, the honey making process, bee behavior, pest control; hive inspections, and bee folklore. Bee classes began in November of 2020 and to date we have conducted two classes. Classes are not offered from December through February or when weather prohibits.

Population(s) Served

GHF’s activities are largely supported through visitor donations and the farm’s agritourism activities, including overnight cabin and camping stays. Agritourism activities integrate knowledge transfer intended to foster compassion toward animals and the insects that are critical components to environmentally sustainable farm management from manure fertilization and cover crops to dung beetles and bee pollination, while offering an affordable hands-on farm experience. Overnight stays range from $5 per night with volunteer hours to $50 per night for our inclusive cottage. Guests can also visit our flocks of chickens, containing many breeds listed on the Livestock Conservancy registry as threatened or endangered.

Population(s) Served

Studies have shown that contact with animals assists with social, emotional, and cognitive functioning, and improves PTSD, depression, and anxiety treatments. For GHF, therapeutic services serve a dual purpose in bringing therapeutic services to the community as a whole, while also exposing participants to the unique personalities and sustainable value of goat stewardship which simultaneously contributes to the prevention of animal cruelty.
We currently offer goat yoga classes every other weekend, where participants relax while doing light yoga with the goats.
Our pasture and goat nursery are wheelchair accessible and we welcome anyone who would like to visit the herd simply to destress. We have marketed and hosted “midterm and final exam destress with the goats” opportunities free of charge to local college students.
We plan to partner with Tallahassee Memorial Animal Therapy (TMAT) program to bring our therapy goats into senior centers and hospice care. The TMAT program provides training to therapy animal providers and serves over 60 different facilities each year. We intend to recruit volunteers to assist in training new kids for therapy and to expand our team of certified handlers.

Population(s) Served
Age groups
Age groups
Age groups

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

-To establish standards and communicative strategies for first time goat owners based on scientific best practices and holistic care. 30% time.
Future: Because we have found a lack of farm friendly and reliable resources in goat management, future activities will include a publicly accessible database of sound scientific practices in herd management drawn specifically from peer reviewed research and credentialed professionals. It is also our goal to promote county and university extension services by collaborating with these offices to provide a centralized online location (goatguild.org) of upcoming events, funding, and training opportunities for goat producers. We intend to apply for a USDA SARE grant to support this endeavor in 2021.
-To develop and build community educational programs on goat husbandry and beekeeping centered around compassion, empathy, and environmental awareness. 40% time.
Future: In the future, we plan to extend our day visits to include the value of dairy goat sustainability with the addition of cheesemaking and soap crafting classes. We also intend on adding a honey extraction activity during summer honey harvest.
In 2021-2022, we will implement beetle banks on the farm to both improve pasture management and teach visitors about the important aspect of beetles in parasite control. We have applied for a FACT grant to build our beetle banks.
-To improve community wellness through goat-assisted therapeutic services. 20% time.
Future: We plan to partner with Tallahassee Memorial Animal Therapy (TMAT) program to bring our therapy goats into senior centers and hospice care. The TMAT program provides training to therapy animal providers and serves over 60 different facilities each year. We intend to recruit volunteers to assist in training new kids for therapy and to expand our team of certified handlers.

-To partner with nonprofit organizations in order to align shared missions and services. 10% time.
Future: As mentioned above, we intend to develop educational partnerships with county and land grant university extension services. Instead of duplicating any services available via other nonprofit organizations, GHF intends to identify organizations for resources and referrals that align with our stated mission.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve the entire community with general programming and new goat owners with goat specific classes.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We have expanded the times of our classes to increase availability.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    No.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Goat House Farm

Board of directors
as of 3/19/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

MELISSA HUGHES

Goat House Farm

Term: 2020 -

Christine Phillips

Cynthia Gill

Denise Spivey

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/19/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/19/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.