Freedom House

Richmond, VA   |  www.freedomhouserichmond.org
This organization has not appeared on the IRS Business Master File in a number of months. It may have merged with another organization or ceased operations.

Mission

Mission:
Weprovide food, shelter and the power to change for people in crisis.
 
FreedomHouse has been serving Richmond’s homeless and working poor for 28 years and has developed a strong and responsive continuum of programs for people in crisis that engages individuals and families in services, sustains them through our feeding (Conrad Center) and shelter programs (The Community Shelter and Sean's Place), and supports them through their return toindependence. The continuum of care we provide helps us form a partnership built on trust, respect and dignity with those we serve.
 
Vision:
Ourvision is to end the cycle of hunger and homelessness for the people we serve.
 
Freedom House fosters community between those who serve and those who are served. We are a group of committed people – staff, board, volunteers, partners and clients – that are working together to turn hunger and homelessness into opportunity and hope.
 
 
The Conrad Center Soup Kitchen provides a daily breakfast and dinner and the Community Shelter and Sean's Place provide transitional housing to single adults experiencing homelessness.
 
 Core Values
 We respect every individual
We collaborate with others to expand our reach
We inspire self-reliance
We measure our impact
We value every contribution and use each one wisely

Ruling year info

1983

Principal Officer

Ms. Melba Gibbs

Main address

1201 Hull St

Richmond, VA 23224

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EIN

52-1295178

NTEE code info

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Organization-Sponsored Eatery or Agency (K35)

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Conrad Center Soup Kitchen

Freedom House’s Conrad Center Soup Kitchen provides breakfast, dinner and bagged lunch seven days a week to those who are homeless and the working poor. This is the only regular breakfast and dinner program for this population in the area. The issues faced by those served at the Conrad Center are varied and complex, ranging from unemployment, substance abuse and/or mental illness to health problems. Providing nutritious meals helps combat the health issues experienced by this population. The provision of meals is also an important piece of the prevention puzzle in the homeless services system. Low-income working poor often must make difficult choices as to whether to pay the bills, pay the rent or feed the family.  The Conrad  Center is also now open as the Citywide warming shelter when the temperature dips below 35. Persons experiencing homelessness can now access shelter on the most challenging days during the winter. 

 While serving meals is our main focus, the new facility has enabled us to expand the services we offer by co-locating Commonwealth Catholic Charities' Central Intake, the single port of entry to the homeless services system, at the Conrad Center. Central Intake provides intake, crisis case management and housing referrals. All clients accessing the meals program, if appropriate, are given a referral to Central Intake. Richmond Social Services, McGuire’s Veteran’s Affairs and The Daily Planet Healthcare Program also provide a staff member one day each week to connect Central Intake and Freedom House meals program clients to additional resources and benefits. In addition, we all work together with the Richmond City Jail to ensure that if inmates are released without a solid housing service plan they are directed to the Freedom House Conrad Center for meals and a Central Intake interview for service provision. Last year, 788 individuals and families were referred to housing, veteran’s services, health screenings and social services benefits.

Population(s) Served

The Community Shelter, located at 1201 Hull Street in Richmond’s Southside, offers transitional housing to 38 single adults (26 men and 12 women) who remain in the program for up to 12 months. Beginning in October 2012, we began reserving 12 of our men's beds for veterans experiencing homelessness as well. During their stay, a case manager works with the resident to set goals, develop a service plan and re-establish family ties. While at the shelter, residents must remain drug and alcohol free, attend support group meetings such as AA and NA if applicable, find and retain employment, attend workshops on life skills and, continue to increase their vocational and educational skills. Workshops are held regularly for residents on topics such as money management, life skills and stress and anger management.

 

Residents work on debt reduction to reduce barriers to permanent housing such as past due utility bills and prior rental eviction fees. They are also highly encouraged to utilize our escrow account for savings to prepare for successful program completion.  Case management, 24-hour monitoriing, curfews and behavior accountabilty are all provided to ensure clients have the support and structure needed to address the issues that led to this episode of  homelessness. Volunteers from faith-based communities and organizations provide a balanced meal for the residents seven evenings a week.

 

Last year's data for persons remaining in the program for six months or longer reflect that 83% were successful in moving into permanent housing, 93% were employed, and 97% were drug and alcohol free at time of exit.

Population(s) Served

Sean’s Place is an18-month “step up” housing program for men and women continuing their journeyto self-sufficiency. These individuals no longer need the day-to-day guidanceof a case manager, but still seek a supportive environment in which to grow andthrive. In the fall of 2012 Sean’s Place transitioned from a large facilitybased program to scattered site rental housing. Residents pay a program feeeach month and must save 10% of their gross monthly income for debt reduction.Each house features individual private bedrooms and shared living spaces. Acommunity environment is a large part of the success of Sean’s Place.Prospective new roommates are interviewed by current residents to ensure thatthey are committed to living productively in a peer support community. While atSean’s Place, they continue to work with a Case Manager and must remainemployed full-time or working part-time and enrolled in an educational program.Sean’s Place outcomes are some of the best in the area. Ninety-eight percent ofour residents move into permanent housing and do not return to the homelessservices system.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

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Awards

Valentine Richmond History Makers Award for Promoting Stronger Communities 2010

Valentine Museum

John Jasper Trailblazer Award 2011

Sixth Mount Zion Baptist Church

Affiliations & memberships

Combined Federal Campaign 1993

ConnectRichmond 2005

Greater Richmond Chamber of Commerce 2006

HandsOn Greater Richmond 2007

Homeward 1999

Central Virginia Foodbank Partner Agency 1999

Partnership for Nonprofit Excellence 2005

Financials

Freedom House
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Freedom House

Board of directors
as of 02/22/2013
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Jillian Wood

PricewaterhouseCoopers

Term: 2011 - 2013

Jane Conrad

Community Volunteer

Mark Cipolletti

Mondial USA

Brandon Walters-Davis

Wellpoint/Health Management

Carolyn Grady

Federal Courts, Public Defenders Office

Richard Guilmart

Retired, Civilian Fort Lee

Anne Hines

Thomas-Hines Interiors, Owner

Sue Ann Messmer

Retired, VCU Office of the President

Evan Silverstein

Snap Partners

Jaime Stefan

Consultant

David Wade

Anthem, Vice President of Marketing, retired

Nancy Warman

St. James Episcopal Church

Jillian Wood

Pricewaterhousecoppers

Gary Smith

Altria

Wyn Brown

Genworth Financial

Lennart Freeman

Retired President, Swedish Match North America

Lynn Lancaster

City of Richmond