PLATINUM2023

Alaska Wilderness League

Washington, DC   |  http://www.alaskawild.org

Mission

Alaska Wilderness League protects Alaska's wild lands and waters by inspiring broad support for federal policy action.

Ruling year info

1993

Principal Officer

Kristen Miller

Main address

122 C St NW Ste 650

Washington, DC 20001 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

52-1814742

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (C01)

Wildlife Preservation/Protection (D30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Since 1993, Alaska Wilderness League has served as the only national organization dedicated exclusively to the protection of Alaska’s iconic public lands and waters, with a particular focus on the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Arctic Ocean, Western Arctic, and the Tongass & Chugach National Forests. These public lands earned a variety of protections in recent decades, with some particularly large successes realized at the end of the Obama administration. Today, the League is busy defending these core wins, while also preparing for when the political landscape improves for Alaska conservation. We must be ready after the 2018 and 2020 election cycles, to undo damage caused by the current administration while working to push proactive initiatives alike.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Lead the effort to preserve Alaska’s wild lands and waters.

Alaska is a national and international treasure, with towering mountain peaks and glaciers, old growth forests, pristine tundra, rivers, wetlands, and barrier islands. Nowhere else under our flag is there as diverse and abundant fish and wildlife, vast herds of free roaming caribou, unparalleled wild salmon runs and millions of birds that nest in Alaska before traveling to every state and six of seven continents. 225 million acres of federal lands in Alaska – including National Parks, National Forests and National Wildlife Refuges – are owned by all Americans, each with a stake in responsible stewardship.

Alaska Wilderness League stands with, serves, and supports the many people and organizations that believe in a sustainable future for Alaska. We honor and respect the cultures of Alaska Natives whose way of life remains deeply connected to the state’s land, waters, and wildlife. We believe that Alaska’s long-term economic future and subsistence traditions are inexorably tied to the health and sound stewardship of its natural resources, which support hunting, fishing, tourism, and unrivaled outdoor experiences that are central to Alaskans’ quality of life.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of list subscribers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Lead the effort to preserve Alaska’s wild lands and waters.

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of comments delivered to decisionmakers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Lead the effort to preserve Alaska’s wild lands and waters.

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of community events or trainings held and attendance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Lead the effort to preserve Alaska’s wild lands and waters.

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Events reported here took place largely virtually and included presentations, discussion panels, movie screenings and virtual rallies led by both staff and volunteers.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Alaska Wilderness League was founded as a non-profit 501(c)(3) corporation to further the protection of public lands and waters in Alaska. Alaska Wilderness League's mission is to lead the effort to preserve Alaska's wild lands and waters by engaging citizens and decision makers with a courageous, constant, victorious voice for Alaska.

Alaska Wilderness League galvanizes people to defend and protect America’s wildest public lands and waters in Alaska by building power to influence decision-makers in Congress and Alaska. In particular, to best position the organization for success in the long run, the League is focused on the following key niches:
Power Building -- restoring bipartisan leadership for Alaska conservation through a stronger, more politically connected grasstops network of influential people in key states and districts, along with a better resourced and effective lobbying operation.
Partnerships -- building a strong network of local, state, regional and national organizations that care about Alaska, serving as a vital bridge between our Alaska-based partners - including indigenous allies - and decision-makers in Washington, DC.
Policies. We defend against attacks on our nation’s last great wild places while advancing new policies that better protect these national treasures for future generations.

For the past 25 years Alaska Wilderness League has evolved from a 2-person scrappy lobbying shop based in a semi-run down Capitol Hill townhouse to a national organization with more than 15 staff, offices in DC and Anchorage, 100,000 members, activists & supporters, and a well-earned reputation as the leading advocacy group working at the federal level on the conservation of Alaska’s public lands and waters. Throughout this history, we have built a strong reputation as a trusted partner to Alaska and national groups and indigenous people alike. These partnerships, cultivated over many years, enables the League to galvanize a wide community -- both in and outside of conservation groups -- in order to extend our reach both on capitol hill and throughout the country.

Since its founding in 1993, Alaska Wilderness League and our partners have secured many victories, including strong Roadless and old growth protections for the Tongass National Forest, safeguarding huge swaths of the Arctic Ocean, and a putting in place a landmark new management plan for the Western Arctic. We have also successfully led the fight to thwart dozens of assaults on the iconic Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The League has fought and continues to fight to protect the wild of Alaska, striving to achieve permanent protections for the areas we work in.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is hard to come up with good questions to ask people

Financials

Alaska Wilderness League
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Alaska Wilderness League

Board of directors
as of 08/24/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Pat Pourchot

Debbie Miller

Betsy Loyless

Ellen Ferguson

Toni Armstrong

Steve Barker

Pat Pourchot

Brian O'Donnell

Jody Juneby Potts

Kit DesLauriers

John Sterling

Greg Moga

Chad Brown

Yvonne Besvold

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/10/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/24/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.