PLATINUM2023

OAR of Fairfax County, Inc

Rebuilding lives with Opportunities, Alternatives, and Resources

aka OAR and OAR Nova   |   FAIRFAX, VA   |  http://www.oarnova.org

Mission

To rebuild lives and create a safer community with opportunities, alternatives, and resources for justice-involved individuals and their families

Ruling year info

1975

Executive Director

Mr. Derwin Overton

Main address

10700 PAGE AVENUE SUITE 200

FAIRFAX, VA 22030 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Offender Aid and Restoration of Fairfax County

EIN

54-0952630

NTEE code info

Services to Prisoners/Families (I43)

Prison Alternatives (I44)

Spouse Abuse, Prevention of (I71)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

OAR provides the assistance necessary to help individuals to overcome the challenges that lead to and result from arrest, incarceration, and release. OAR's target population is adult men and women, and their families, in Northern Virginia who are involved with the criminal justice system. The target population has unmet needs due to gaps in services, unique criminogenic risk factors, collateral consequences imposed on the population, and social attitudes. The population is often overlooked, denied services, or deliberately ignored because of their criminal backgrounds. Significant personal and societal barriers exist that limit opportunities for community reintegration after criminal justice system involvement. Criminogenic risk factors influence a former offender’s behavior and require a level of intervention that is not offered by the typical human services provider. Without intervention most members of the target population return to criminal behavior.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Virginia Serious and Violent Offenders Rentry Program (VASAVOR)

Provides individuals convicted of serious and violent offenses who are returning to the community after lengthy terms of incarceration with intensives reentry services through a collaborative partnership with community organizations and criminal justices system partners.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people
Adults

Offers emergency assistance to families and newly released inmates as well as jail based services, employment assistance, and case management to ensure a successful transition to the community after incarceration.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Incarcerated people

Offers alternatives to incarceration for first-time offenders through community service and programing to address underlying reasons for criminal behavior.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Incarcerated people

Provides volunteer led classes for inmates in County jails and related volunteer opportunities with the organization including mentoring, service coordination, family support group, violence intervention and membership on the Board of Directors.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Incarcerated people

Where we work

Awards

Volunteer Service Award: Outstanding Volunteer Program 2007

Volunteer Fairfax

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Incarcerated people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Detainees

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of participants engaged in pre-release programs *The jails were closed to volunteers in 2021 due to COVID and just a handful of staff members were allowed to facilitate very small class sizes.

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Incarcerated people

Related Program

Volunteer Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

During the pandemic,and all of 2021, the jails have been closed to volunteers, which have been the primary driver of volunteer engagement.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Volunteer Program

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

As OAR's Jail Programs are the primary driver of volunteers/volunteer hours, this decrease in 2021 is expected as the jails were closed to volunteers the entire year of 2021.

Number of participants who gain employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Incarcerated people

Related Program

Reentry and Family Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

OAR seeks to rebuild individual lives and create safer communities. Criminal behavior and recidivism is obviously costly, results in the waste of human potential, and negatively impacts the community. OAR programs and services are designed to drastically reduce the tendency for justice-involved community members to relapse into criminal behavior. OAR programs seek to: 1) change criminal behavior and break the cycle of crime; 2) assist individuals with the transition from incarceration to the community; 3) address emergencies at the time of release from incarceration and guide individuals to financial self-sufficiency; 4) provide specialized assistance for the unique needs of the population and; 5) limit overall criminal justice system costs that result from recidivism.

OAR is the only non-profit service provider in the region that offers pre and post-release reentry services for the target population. The ability to serve individuals pre-release and continue services post-release makes the OAR service model unique. This approach builds relationships and trust with the target population. An established relationship allows for better continuity of services and increases the likelihood that members of the target population will follow through on services plan goals that lead to greater self-sufficiency and success. OAR services are also unique because they take a dual approach that: 1) addresses the practical needs of those returning to the community after criminal justice involvement and, 2) addresses the criminogenic risk factors that often lead the target population to return to criminal behavior. In order to comprehensively meet the needs of the client population, OAR uses the Risk-Needs-Responsivity (RNR) approach. RNR is an evidence-based framework for assessing and assisting justice-involved individuals. The approach revolves around three principles: 1) the level of service should match the individual’s risk of reoffending (Risk), 2) criminogenic needs (factors that make someone more likely to re-offend) should be targeted and addressed (Need), and 3) interventions should be matched to the individual (Responsivity). Adherence to the principles of RNR sets OAR services apart from other providers and is a best practice in the field of offender reentry services.

OAR is governed by a volunteer Board and managed by a five-member Director’s team. Eighteen staff members and over 130 active volunteers are responsible for the implementation of OAR programs and services. Organizational oversight, leadership, and expertise is provided by a volunteer Board currently comprised of 14 members and the OAR Executive Director. Board members have diverse expertise and skill sets. Board members serve on organizational teams and this provides a platform to share their expertise and collective knowledge for the benefit of the organization. The Director’s team provides organizational oversight, guidance, and direction to staff and volunteers. The Director’s team has over 60 years of cumulative experience with OAR programs and services and consists of the Executive Director, Director of Programs, Director of Reentry Services, Director of Operations, and Director of Development. OAR has successfully implemented comprehensive pre and post-release reentry services for nearly 50 years. OAR has established relationships with criminal justice partners that provide access to local jails and detention facilities for staff and volunteers. OAR also maintains a relationship with researchers at George Mason University in order to ensure effective program evaluation. OAR has also collected, tracked, and reported outcome data for over 12 years, that demonstrates the value of our services and the impact that our services have on those we serve.

In 1971, the local OAR office was established with a vision of citizen visitors helping jail inmates. In 1992, OAR began to secure resources to augment the all-volunteer staff with paid professionals with the education, knowledge, and training to implement services. In 1998, OAR began a partnership with researchers at George Mason University to validate OAR services through research and to perform program evaluation. OAR launched a certified Batterer Intervention Program to address violence in intimate partner relationships in 2001. Also in 2001 OAR expanded its use of volunteers to effectively meet a growing demand for services. In 2006, OAR launched a collaborative partnership to form the Virginia Serious and Violent Offender Reentry (VASAVOR) program to provide intensive services to members of the target population that posed the greatest risk to the community. In 2010, with resources from a Federal Grant, OAR redeveloped our mentoring program to meet best practice standards, provide pre and post release mentoring services, and to provide greater support and training to volunteers. OAR made a shift in 2010 in the reporting of outputs (i.e. number of clients served, number of services provided) to the reporting of outcomes using results based accountability. By 2012 OAR began implementing Evidence Based Practices and redesigned our client service model to mirror the Transition from Jail to Community model established by the National Institute of Corrections and developed specifically for local jail populations. In 2015, OAR began enhancing services in Prince William and Loudoun Counties. OAR dedicated resources acquired from the Commonwealth of Virginia, the United Way, and other community funders to increase services for community members in those regions. In 2018, OAR was awarded a generous grant through Loudoun County allowing OAR to enhance jail and community-based programs for Loudoun County residents. From that time through 2021, OAR also worked on contract with Prince William County to be the primary provider of jail based reentry services at the Prince William-Manassas Regional Adult Detention Center. OAR strives to be a national model for effective offender reentry services.

Financials

OAR of Fairfax County, Inc
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

OAR of Fairfax County, Inc

Board of directors
as of 12/07/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Jemal Finey

Alan Davis

Retired

A. Van Graves

Business Accounting

Grant Ehat

Retail Managing Partner

Derwin J. Overton

OAR of Fairfax County

Vincent Smith

Legal Services of NOVA

George Warren

Retired Banking Professional

Jemal Finney

Consulting Business Owner

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/15/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/20/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.