National Institute for Learning Development

Bringing Lifelong Learning to Life

aka NILD   |   SUFFOLK, VA   |  www.nild.org

Mission

NILD's mission is to develop and implement instructional strategies for training educators to cognitively modify students to become more effective learners.

Ruling year info

1990

Executive Director

Dr. Kristin Barbour

Main address

1540 Breezeport Way, Suite 500

SUFFOLK, VA 23435 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

54-1506977

NTEE code info

Specialized Education Institutions/Schools for Visually or Hearing Impaired, Learning Disabled (B28)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

One of the most pressing issues today for educators is how to work with all learners effectively. Many veteran educators, as well as newly trained educators, have not been exposed to the scientific support for neuroplasticity, the belief that intelligence is not fixed. Not fully grasping this concept seems to impede students from reaching their full potential. NILD acknowledges the recent advances in research that show there is a direct relationship between using the brain and changing the brain.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

NILD

NILD is the training and professional certifying agency for educational therapists in schools and clinics across the United States and in 26 other countries. NILD has a current active membership of over 1,400 educational therapists.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Historically, society believed that intelligence was a fixed trait (e.g., think eye color) that remained stable over the life span. NILD believes that intelligence resembles a state that can be modified, that students can increase their capacity to learn, and that neuroplasticity is meaningfully affected by the learning process. Stated another way, cognitive development and skill acquisition change brain structure. The neurophysiological structures in the brain are modifiable, demonstrating both flexibility and adaptability. Educators using brain-based instruction strategies infused with a student-centered mediational approach develop critical and creative thinking processes facilitating students’ growth into independent and confident learners.

NILD trains and equips educators to address students’ learning abilities through a comprehensive approach, as illustrated in the NILD logo. Each of the four elements contained in the NILD logo uniquely and comprehensively addresses the personalized needs of all learners. NILD’s holistic approach to learning builds thinking and changes behavior. Our student-centered, brain-based instructional approach raises expectations for cognitive and emotional change, building competent and confident learners who want to learn. NILD educational methodology uniquely uses language to shape thinking and develop core academic skills and critical thinking through:

• Explicit and intentional instruction

• Inductive reasoning and Socratic Questioning

• Guided practice and Systematic feedback

• Student self-regulation and transfer of skills

As a result, confidence and competence are improved for all students. Educators are better equipped to be agents of renewal. Students become active participants in their own learning. Individual potential is unlocked, and students’ horizons are expanded. By equipping teachers to teach students how to learn, students emerge as independent learners, more capable future employees, family members, and responsible citizens.

At present, only a handful of other (less than 10) U.S. companies has been endorsed by the International Dyslexia Association (IDA www.interdys.org). The significance of the IDA endorsement is that a highly credible, international organization, recognizes NILD as meeting the knowledge and practice standards of training programs that equip educators to work with individuals with dyslexia and language-based learning difficulties. NILD’s competitive edge is that it develops competency with core academic skills, including reading, math, and writing through a comprehensive approach aimed at facilitating cognitive development. Fundamentally changing the learner is the goal, not just helping them develop a subset of skills.

Over the past 40 years, NILD has trained over 15,000 educators world-wide and has globally impacted over 100,000 students through our brain-based teaching programs. Currently, NILD is serving 2,000 educators throughout the U.S. and internationally. NILD also supports seven international partner countries implementing the NILD program in schools and communities. NILD continues to develop research-informed, best-practice curriculum to continue supporting an ever-changing landscape.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

National Institute for Learning Development
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

National Institute for Learning Development

Board of directors
as of 02/11/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Derek Keenan

Dr. James Kinard

Dr. Larry McCullough

Derek Keenan

Dr. Bob Burris

Dr. Jane Duffey

Dr. Joel Uecker

Ken Smitherman

Donna Weston

Johnnie Pearson

Adam Rex

John Zimmerman, N.D.

Dr. Larry McCullough

S. Paul Hobbs

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes