GOLD2024

HOSPICE AND PALLIATIVE CARE FOUNDATION

Providing Assistance for Moments in Life When You Need It Most

aka HPCF   |   Drayton, SC   |  www.hpcfoundation.org

Mission

The mission of the Hospice and Palliative Care Foundation (HPCF) is to discover and address the unmet needs of individuals and families facing end-of-life issues through innovative and collaborative programs and services, and includes financial, educational, and grief support.

Notes from the nonprofit

Thank you for taking the time to review our organization more in-depth. As a small not for profit organization we work very hard to ensure all funds raised are utilized in the most effective way possible, by fulfilling our mission and serving individuals throughout South Carolina who are facing end of life issues. We could not do this without you. Thank you for your consideration, concern, and contributions. Should you have any questions please feel free to contact us: [email protected]

Ruling year info

2001

Director of Operations

Julie Bright

Main address

PO Box 151

Drayton, SC 29333 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

57-1107253

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Having a family member, adult or child, with a life-limiting or life-threatening illness can easily cause a family to enter a state of situational poverty, as gaps and limitations in insurance coverage and financing become evident. The need for those we serve is great, as evidenced by the growing number of seniors, adults, and children that have life-limiting or life-threatening illnesses, or are dealing with the death of a loved one. Hospice and palliative care are comprised of several supportive services, all of which may not traditionally covered by Medicare, Medicaid or private insurance, leaving many individuals and families to rely on nonprofit organizations and other charitable forms of assistance or to pay substantial costs out of pocket. The Hospice and Palliative Care Foundation can help families bridge these funding gaps and receive the support that is critical to avoiding situational poverty and improving quality of life.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Camp Hands Of Hope

Since 2007, HPCF has provided two-three weekend-long, all-expenses paid bereavement camps for youth and their families who have experienced the loss of a loved one each year. Certified, clinical volunteers write the curriculum and contribute approximately 1,200 total hours of their time per camp. Approximately 150 participants attend camp each year. A third camp was added in 2016 targeted toward children and families in low-income school districts that may not have access to bereavement education services.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

When a family is impacted by an incurable illness, they are faced with managing a household and finances as well as obtaining physical, emotional and spiritual care - all while coping with anticipated death. These additional responsibilities can create increased stress as critical needs not covered by hospice care or insurance often go unmet. HPCF's Adult Gift and Relief Fund is designed to help individuals receiving hospice or palliative care services bridge these funding gaps, and receive the support that is critical to improving their quality of life. Financial relief can include help with utility bills, rent/mortgage payments, transportation, funeral costs, and other needs that arise that can cause a family to enter a state of situational poverty if the need cannot be met. In addition, HPCF provides financial education resources to families assisted through the program to help prevent future financial crises.

Population(s) Served
Adults
People with diseases and illnesses

There are over 230,000 children currently living with chronic complex medical conditions in our state. Having a child with a life-limiting or life-threatening illness can easily cause a family to enter a state of situational poverty, as gaps and limitations in insurance coverage and financing become evident. The Hospice and Palliative Care Foundation's Pediatric Care Program was developed in response to the need for pediatric hospice and palliative care patients and their families to pay for critical unfunded expenses like utility bills, rent/mortgage payments, transportation, and funeral costs; and improve their quality of life through memory making services, including fingerprint charms, small gifts that provide comfort and joy, holiday gifts, and professional photography and videography.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
People with diseases and illnesses

The Hospice and Palliative Care Foundation's Hospice and Palliative Care Education Program was established in 2014 in response to the need for children, youth and their families to have access to grief management resources outside of Camp Hands of Hope. Through this program, the Foundation provides grief education materials for bereavement camps, support groups and other therapeutic or educational purposes through school partnerships throughout South Carolina. HPCF also provides financial education resources for veterans navgating the VA system at end-of-life.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families
Veterans

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Because there are very few other organizations in our state providing the services we supply, HPCF is in a good position to be the leading organization in our state to raise awareness and provide resources for individuals and families that are not only touched by illness and death, but are also struggling with financial issues and situational poverty. Many families have turned to the Foundation after all other resources have been exhausted. Families who have requested assistance have often used up all of their PTO, sick days, and even FMLA benefits or have had to end their employment in order to take care of their terminally ill child or adult family member. This puts families in a very difficult position of not being able to make ends meet. Our financial assistance program is a good place to start to address these issues, but HPCF realizes the need to increase the level to which we are able to assist each family so they can focus on time spent with their loved one, as they have so often stated when providing feedback for our programs. As we strategically plan for growth, we rely on feedback and input from our professional partners and the individuals and families that we serve. We are committed to making all of our programs and services accessible to all children and families touched by illness and death, and overcoming the barriers to access for families with developmental, cultural, and language differences that can impact the use and understanding of services and resources. Assistance is granted regardless of race, color, sex, religion, age or national origin and solely on the needs of the family. Our nationally recognized Camp Hands of Hope program is the only statewide bereavement camp program, and it involves bringing grieving children and their families together to participate in bereavement education in a supportive, professional setting. We seek to grow our three times yearly camp sessions, adding more throughout the state in order to reach as many children and their families that need this support.

First, HPCF will continue to provide improved means to stabilize families’ incomes through funding that meets the family’s most urgent needs; and in conjunction with this, we aim to provide information detailing other resources both locally and statewide to help program participants along their journey to financial stability. Resources including budgeting tips and information on how to access other assistance programs are provided to each participant, and also available to anyone on the HPCF website. These resources are updated as new information is discovered and connections are made. It is a goal of the Foundation to partner with a financial institute to develop a financial toolkit for individuals and families to address the financial stress that goes hand in hand with end-of-life issues. We are reaching out to potential partners through community presentations, funding proposals, and networking opportunities in order to initiate this plan.

Second, through our quality of life initiatives, HPCF can provide a family with memory making opportunities, including photography, small gifts, and fingerprint charms; technological assistance; and bereavement education and support. We rely on feedback and input from our professional partners and the individuals and families that we serve in order to identify and address their most pressing needs. We engage an Advisory Board comprised of bereavement and child life specialists, school personnel, and other professionals and community members committed to these tasks to accomplish our work.

For over 20 years, HPCF has been partnering with local hospice and palliative care providers, faith communities, civic groups, local businesses and individuals to develop a network that provides referrals, guidance, and support for the Foundation’s programs. Directing resources to adult and pediatric hospice and palliative care patients can produce significant impacts, including keeping families from entering crisis poverty situations; using telemedicine to increase communication between pediatric palliative care patients and their medical teams; providing comprehensive, ongoing support for families in bereavement; and partnering with medical professionals and institutions like the Mary Black School of Nursing to develop innovative research initiatives regarding palliative and end-of-life care.

Our strengths lie in the professional partnerships that allow us to obtain direct feedback from the individuals and families we serve. Working with their professional caregivers gives HPCF the opportunity to hear directly from the children and families whom we serve. The professionals that make program referrals work very closely with the families, complete surveys at the time of application, and share testimonials regarding client outcomes. Although HPCF has only 2 staff members, our vast network allows us to effectively reach hospice and palliative care patients throughout the state. The Board and staff work together to analyze feedback and set the strategic direction of the organization in an informed manner. Members of our Board and Advisory Board have extensive experience working directly with hospice and palliative care patients. In addition, HPCF is a member of Together SC, formerly the South Carolina Association of Nonprofit Organizations (SCANPO), and follows best practices in its governance and accountability. As participants and partners voice new needs, HPCF continues to expand its services to meet the growing need for support of adult and pediatric hospice and palliative care patients.

HPCF has over 20 years of experience meeting the needs of hospice and palliative care patients and bereaved family members through collaborative partnerships and innovative services. HPCF has thus far provided over $150,000 in financial aid to families living at or below the federal poverty limit. Camp Hands of Hope, our nationally recognized, youth centered and family focused bereavement camp, has served over 1,500 individuals since 2007. From 2015-2017, the New York Life Foundation has awarded us $40,000 in grant funding for website development and expansion of our bereavement programming, which has resulted in the increased enrollment of low-income and/or ethnically underserved families into our camp sessions, and the distribution of grief education materials for grieving children and families through school partnerships. In 2014, HPCF began to provide iPads to children receiving hospice services at home so they could communicate with their medical teams remotely, and utilize customized apps for therapeutic reasons and to normalize play. Other key initiatives recently added include partnering with a professional photographer to create special memories for families with children that have terminal illnesses. In 2017, we added two new initiatives at the request of child life specialists who work with families with terminally ill children: a “small gift” fund, which will give families the opportunity to receive theater tickets, park passes, toys, or other experiences or items that bring their child comfort and joy; and custom-made fingerprint charms that can be worn as a necklace or bracelet, so a part of the child can always be with their family member. Assisting veterans receiving hospice care is a focus of our programming in 2018-2019, and is supported by the Spartanburg County Foundation and Finance of America Cares. We are committed to making all of our programs and services accessible to all children and families touched by illness and death, and overcoming the barriers to access for families with developmental, cultural, and language differences that can impact the use and understanding of services and resources. Assistance is granted regardless of race, color, sex, religion, age or national origin and solely on the needs of the family.

HPCF is a member of the National Alliance for Grieving Children and Together SC, formerly the South Carolina Association of Nonprofit Organizations (SCANPO), and follows best practices in its governance and accountability. HPCF has an annual budget of just under $250,000 and continues to expand its services to meet the growing need for support of adult and pediatric hospice and palliative care patients.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback

Financials

HOSPICE AND PALLIATIVE CARE FOUNDATION
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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HOSPICE AND PALLIATIVE CARE FOUNDATION

Board of directors
as of 03/26/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Todd Picou


Board co-chair

J. David Niday

J. David Niday

Todd Picou

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Not applicable
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/23/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/25/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.